China plans to go carbon-neutral by 2060

September 24, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

China, the world’s biggest source of carbon dioxide , is aiming for carbon-neutrality by 2060. President Xi Jinping announced this goal while speaking to the UN General Assembly by video. Xi took the assembly by surprise. Since world events and political tensions have stalled global climate negotiations, the general assembly had expected little progress on climate change until 2021. “We aim to have CO2 emissions peak before 2030 and achieve carbon neutrality before 2060,” Xi said, according to the official translation. China is currently responsible for about 28% of the planet’s carbon emissions . Related: Google becomes retroactively carbon-neutral Xi and then U.S.-President Barack Obama came to a climate change understanding in 2014, which laid significant groundwork for the 2015 Paris Agreement. President Trump immediately backed out of the Paris Agreement upon taking office. Some experts believe that Xi is making an advantageous statement to the world at a time when the U.S. won’t address climate change. “Xi Jinping’s climate pledge at the UN, minutes after President Donald Trump’s speech, is clearly a bold and well calculated move,” said Li Shuo, a climate policy expert from Greenpeace Asia, according to BBC. “It demonstrates Xi’s consistent interest in leveraging the climate agenda for geopolitical purposes.” While many observers agree that Xi’s pronouncement is a significant step, lots of questions still remain to be answered, such as exactly what he means by carbon-neutrality and how China will get there. “Today’s announcement by President Xi Jinping that China intends to reach carbon neutrality before 2060 is big and important news — the closer to 2050 the better,” said former U.S. climate envoy Todd Stern. Richard Black, director of the U.K.-based think tank Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit, is hopeful about Xi’s pronouncement. “China isn’t just the world’s biggest emitter but the biggest energy financier and biggest market, so its decisions play a major role in shaping how the rest of the world progresses with its transition away from the fossil fuels that cause climate change.” Via BBC Image via Ferdinand Feng

Original post:
China plans to go carbon-neutral by 2060

Biden vs Trump on environmental issues and climate change

September 22, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

As the U.S. has grown increasingly polarized, it seems more and more like the two presidential candidates inhabit different planets. If you listen to Joe Biden on climate change, you might feel the urge to junk your car and invest in wind power. Meanwhile, the incumbent’s message seems to be that fossil fuels are A-OK. You might find yourself wondering, does Trump believe in climate change? What’s actually in Joe Biden’s climate change plan? Here’s a quick rundown on where the presidential candidates stand on environmental issues and climate change . Imminent need for climate action The most striking difference between the two candidates environmentally is the novella-length treatises the Biden campaign is generating with ideas about how to solve climate problems versus Trump’s more meager approach. Related: Biden’s $2 trillion climate plan: create millions of jobs, reverse climate change Biden has a long record of working on behalf of the climate, dating back, at least, to introducing the Global Climate Protection Act , the first climate change bill to reach the Senate. During his stint as vice president, Biden oversaw the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 , which allocated $90 billion toward clean energy. At that time, he called fighting climate change “the single most important thing” the executive team could do while in the White House. He also supported President Obama’s signing of the Paris Agreement. Trump, on the other hand, immediately withdrew from the 2015 Paris climate accord as soon as he took office. Now, the U.S. is the only member country to refuse to participate in the agreement to reduce global emissions . Trump avoids discussing global emission reduction and has refused to sign certain international documents unless climate change references are removed. The Environmental Protection Agency under Trump has taken a distinctly anti-science bent, with half the members of the EPA Board of Scientific Counselors dismissed in 2017 and a 2018 disbanding of a panel of scientists tasked with advising the agency on safe air pollution levels. Trumps agenda has been distinctly anti-environment, including loosening restrictions on methane emissions , waiving environmental laws during the pandemic , rolling back fuel efficiency requirements , repealing water protections and weakening the Endangered Species Act . Making America “great again” seems to mean reverting to the good old days before anybody gave a hoot about the planet. Fossil fuels The fossil fuel issue is a tricky dance for Democratic politicians. While most agree that the future lies in renewable energy, most cars and airplanes still run on fossil fuels. Biden pledged not to take any fossil fuel money for his campaign. But he still has a weakness for natural gas, which he has supported in the past as a “bridge fuel” between dirtier gasoline and coal and cleaner renewable energy. He has not called for a ban on fracking . Biden has promised to end all subsidies to fossil fuel companies. Trump doesn’t have a problem with fossil fuel. As it says on WhiteHouse.gov , “Americans have long been told that our country is running out of energy, but we now know that is wrong.” The president has promoted using more fossil fuel, especially coal. He’s chosen lobbyists and leaders in the fossil fuel industry for important federal posts, including as EPA administrator and as secretary of the Interior Department. Trump has worked to expand gas and oil drilling , including in the Arctic and the Gulf of Mexico. He’s claimed victory over what he calls “the war on coal .” Renewable energy Biden talks about the U.S. achieving a target of 100% clean energy. His strategies include grid-scale storage that will be 10 times more economical than lithium-ion batteries, small modular nuclear reactors, net-zero energy buildings, development of carbon-neutral construction materials, doubling offshore wind production by 2030 and the development and deployment carbon capture sequestration technology. His track record in the Senate and as vice president bears out his commitment to clean energy. Trump has dismembered the Obama-era Clean Power Plan, which privileged clean energy construction over oil and gas. His administration repeatedly sliced funding that incentivized developing clean energy, proposing to cut up to 87% of the Department of Energy’s Office of Efficiency and Renewable Energy budget. He’s also proposed eliminating electric vehicle tax credits. While initially the Trump administration embraced new federal leases for offshore wind farms, it cut federal incentives for harvesting offshore wind. A 2018 tariff on solar panels manufactured outside the U.S. that was meant to boost jobs backfired, costing American jobs and upping panel prices. Environmental justice Biden has officially recognized that low-income neighborhoods and communities of color are disproportionately affected by pollution and climate change and addresses how to change this in the Joe Biden climate change plan. Trump has not addressed the subject. Via Joe Biden and WhiteHouse.gov Images via Adobe Stock and Pixabay

View post:
Biden vs Trump on environmental issues and climate change

Candelas hydrofoil boat is the worlds first electric speedboat

September 22, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Candela is a Sweden-based start-up company on a mission to switch the world’s marine transport industry to electric power. Now, the company has announced its new hydrofoil boat, the Candela Seven, as the world’s first fully electric speedboat. According to Candela, the biggest hurdle keeping the electric marine craft industry from reaching its full potential is the discrepancy between speed and range. Electric water-bound vehicles typically either have speed or range, but not both, because planing motor boat hulls need enormous amounts of energy to go fast. A standard 25-foot boat, for example, needs 15 times the amount of energy of a standard car. Building an electric boat with the capability to perform just as efficiently as a boat that uses fossil fuels with contemporary batteries poses the biggest challenge. Related: Cool retro boats restored with electric motors In order to reduce friction from the water, Candela uses submerged hydrofoils under the surface of the water. These wings provide enough lift at 17 knots to completely lift the boat’s hull out of the water, reducing energy use by as much as 80%. The result is an exceedingly long all-electric range at high speeds, upward of 50 nautical miles or 92 kilometers, on one charge. Speeds go up to 20 knots, and the range is three times more efficient than the best electric boats currently on the market. In addition to the range and speed, these hydrofoils also provide a smoother ride thanks to their ability to move above the water’s wake and chop. Rather than feeling the boat bounce up and down on the water as it moves, occupants on the hydrofoil boat get to effortlessly glide along the water as the hydrofoils lift the vessel up and over rough water. According to the company, a series of onboard computers and sensors went into the design of the Candela Seven. In order to monitor the boat’s stability, these sensors constantly measure the height and adjust the foils to maintaining pitch, roll and height automatically. + Candela Speed Boat Via Electrek Images via Candela Speed Boat

Originally posted here:
Candelas hydrofoil boat is the worlds first electric speedboat

Reusable Packaging: Scaling Past a Pandemic

September 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Reusable Packaging: Scaling Past a Pandemic How can companies shift to reusable packaging models while dissuading concerns for safety and contamination? Since the day of the milkman, companies have launched untold schemes to skip recycling for its less energy- and material-intensive cousin: reuse. While using packaging over and over again is no new concept, recent business model innovations have seen a resurgence of reuse-inspired services. But as health and safety concerns take center stage, the future of reuse has been called into question. This discussion introduces the multitude of ways retailers and brands are enacting reuse models, including systems for refill, returnable packaging or optimising the supply-chain with reusable transport packaging. The panel explores what opportunities reuse can afford, including brand loyalty, optimized operations, and reduced costs, while exploring how brands can address contamination concerns head on. Take a deep dive into the opportunities and obstacles to bringing resuse to scale today. Speakers Holly Kaufman, President, Environment & Enterprise Strategies Bridgit Croke, Managing Director, Closed Loop Partners John Hocevar, Oceans Campaign Director, Greenpeace USA Tom Szaky, Founder & CEO, Loop  Holly Secon Wed, 09/16/2020 – 00:22 Featured Off

See the original post here:
Reusable Packaging: Scaling Past a Pandemic

Regenerative Business: From Theory to Practice

September 15, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Regenerative Business: From Theory to Practice How can diverse stakeholders move beyond designing out waste and keeping products in play, to regenerating local economies and natural systems? The promise of a circular economy includes so much more than just designing out waste and keeping molecules in play. The opportunity, and necessity, is to improve the health of every single system that we touch — from product design and manufacturing to how we engage suppliers across a value chain. What’s the opportunity for your organization to regenerate the natural systems upon which your business depends? How can we learn from nature’s ingenious design to increase value across all forms of capital? This discussion grounds regenerative principles in practice, and shares actionable tools for implementing them. Speakers Shana Rappaport, Vice President & Executive Director, VERGE, GreenBiz Group Ahmed Rahiem, CEO & Co-Founder, Numi Amanda Ravenhill, Executive Director, Buckminster Fuller Institute  Holly Secon Tue, 09/15/2020 – 10:33 Featured Off

See more here:
Regenerative Business: From Theory to Practice

From Product to Practice: Circular Innovation from the Ground Up

September 15, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

From Product to Practice: Circular Innovation from the Ground Up How can companies leverage one circular product initiative into an organization-wide, circular transformation? Rethinking your company’s strategy, business model and supply chain for a circular economy — all while continuing to fulfill current and evolving market and customer demands — can be a daunting task. Rather than tackling circularity at scale, some companies are finding early success in starting small. Hear from leading companies about their journeys in optimizing a single product, and how it helped launch enterprise-wide changes in business strategy. Panelists present practical case studies on how implementing and innovating for circular products can transform business practices — from supplier engagement to materials innovation, process improvement, resource optimization and global business strategy. Speakers Christina Raab, Vice President, Strategy & Development, Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute Kellie Ballew, Director of Sustainability, Shaw Industries Group, Inc. Kip Cleverley, VP, Global Sustainability, IFF Holly Secon Tue, 09/15/2020 – 00:30 Featured Off

Go here to see the original:
From Product to Practice: Circular Innovation from the Ground Up

Keeping IT in Play: Maximizing Value and Minimizing E-Waste

September 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Keeping IT in Play: Maximizing Value and Minimizing E-Waste How can companies extend the useful life of IT assets and more effectively manage e-waste at the end of life? The material value of the electronic waste discarded globally each year adds up to $62.5 billion — more than the GDP of most countries — according to the United Nations. With complex, incongruous regulations across the globe, managing the end of life for technologies such as PCs, tablets, smartphones, data center servers, storage and networking gear is a complex affair. This discussion explores how to embrace a more circular approach to IT hardware and e-waste management. Whether your company is decommissioning a data center, upgrading its PCs or managing other gadgets that have reached the end of their usable life, learn how to unlock value from those systems; navigate complex policies surrounding collection, data protection and intellectual property; and maximize asset life cycles through refurbishment, deployment and recycling of old gear. Speakers Heather Clancy, Editorial Director, GreenBiz Group Kabira Stokes, CEO, Retrievr Jamesetta Strickland, Senior Vice President & Regional General Manager, Iron Mountain Holly Secon Mon, 09/14/2020 – 14:38 Featured Off

Go here to see the original:
Keeping IT in Play: Maximizing Value and Minimizing E-Waste

Unpacking Packaging: The Nuances of Material Health

September 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Unpacking Packaging: The Nuances of Material Health How can businesses balance material health, regulatory compliance and public perception when selecting packaging materials? The health and safety implications of materials used in packaging has become a growing concern for consumers, brands and retailers. This discussion unpacks some key questions and nuances in material health, addressing regulatory compliance, evolving public perceptions and growing concerns from consumers. The panel shares real-world insights on materials selection and the importance of material health throughout the lifecycle of a package. Listeners will walk away with strategies and tools to select the best materials for a safe, circular supply chain. Speakers Nina Goodrich, Director, Sustainable Packaging Coalition Jay Bolus, President, MBDC Dr. Lauren Heine, Director of Safer Materials & Data Integrity, ChemForward; Senior Science Advisor, Northwest Green Chemistry Holly Secon Mon, 09/14/2020 – 11:19 Featured Off

View original post here:
Unpacking Packaging: The Nuances of Material Health

Tools of the Trade: Circular Standards, Metrics and Measurements

September 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Tools of the Trade: Circular Standards, Metrics and Measurements What standards, metrics and tools exist to measure circularity, and which is best for your company? To progress circularity, it is critical to transition from theoretical intentions to tactical, number-based goals. This discussion explores the emerging landscape of metrics, standards and tools currently measuring institutional circularity. The panel covers how to use these tools in practice, discussing effective applications and ideal business fit. Speakers Alyson Genovese, Director, North America, Global Reporting Initiative Jarkko Havas, Lead of Data and Metrics, Ellen MacArthur Foundation Christina Raab, Vice President, Strategy & Development, Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute Carolien van Brunschot, Manager, Circular Economy, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Holly Secon Mon, 09/14/2020 – 11:08 Featured Off

Read more:
Tools of the Trade: Circular Standards, Metrics and Measurements

Advanced Recycling: What, When and How to Scale?

September 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Advanced Recycling: What, When and How to Scale?   What is the state of the advanced recycling industry, and what will it take to get it to scale? There’s been a noticeable uptick lately in buzz around advanced recycling (also known as chemical recycling) and the promise of technologies that can fix the broken recycling system. However, the technologies, terminology and applications can be confusing and are not widely understood. This discussion explores the landscape of transformational technologies that stop plastic waste, keep materials in play and grow markets. Speakers discuss the state of the market and highlight the potential for transformational technologies to turn waste plastics back into new materials, decrease reliance on fossil fuels and curb the flow of plastics into marine environments. Speakers Paula Luu, Director, Center for the Circular Economy, Closed Loop Partners Jodie Morgan, CEO, Green Mantra Techologies Mitchell Toomey, Director of Sustainability, BASF Corporation Holly Secon Mon, 09/14/2020 – 11:05 Featured Off

The rest is here:
Advanced Recycling: What, When and How to Scale?

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 9120 access attempts in the last 7 days.