14,000-year-old animal paintings discovered in underground Spanish cave

June 14, 2016 by  
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Archaeologist Deigo Garate made the amazing find nearly 1,000 feet underground in the northern Spanish cave . No one had excavated the area that deeply yet, even though Garate has spent ten years searching Basque Country caves and Atxurra has been known for over 80 years. He told The Local , “It is an exceptional find, the equivalent of discovering a lost Picasso.” Related: 5.5-million-year-old cave holds prehistoric secrets few people have ever seen The paintings were found in excellent condition, with charcoal and flint tools nearby. One depiction features a bison being hunted and pierced with over twenty spears – the most detailed, speared bison depiction in all of Europe. The Atxurra discovery could also be hold the record for most animal figures in all of Basque Country. Garate says, “Without doubt it is the most important discovery of my career.” Via Hyperallergenic Images via Bizkaia Provincial Council

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14,000-year-old animal paintings discovered in underground Spanish cave

New ‘Hobbit’ fossils provide a glimpse into human relative

June 9, 2016 by  
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With the discovery of a tooth here or a bone fragment there, archaeologists piece together the history of humanity – and a recent discovery on the Indonesian island of Flores provides new insight into human evolution . The teeth and mandible belong to a tiny 3-foot-tall hominin species many have nicknamed ‘Hobbits.’ Archaeologists first discovered these Hobbits, or Homo floresiensis , back in 2004 in the Liang Bua cave on western Flores. At that time the fossils created more questions than answers. Did they evolve from Homo erectus , or from other smaller hominins such as Homo habilis or Australopithecus ? They appear to have been small, with small brains, leading some to think they didn’t evolve from Homo erectus at all. Related: Did scientists just discover a new kind of ancient human? In 2014, archaeologists discovered new Hobbit fossils at Mata Menge, about 30 miles east of Liang Bua on Flores in an older layer of rock. This month, the journal Nature published their findings . The six teeth from at least three individuals and one mandible fragment they found reveals the Hobbits likely did evolve from Homo erectus . If that is the case, then the Hobbits’ bodies and brains shrunk. The archaeologists say it would have been an ” evolutionary reversal .” The Hobbits had small brains about the size of a chimpanzee’s, according to Gerrit van den Bergh, lead author on the recently published paper. However, they showed signs of sophistication and walked upright. As one explanation, the archaeologists speculate that since they lived on an island, perhaps they didn’t require large brains. In a video for Nature, Van den Bergh said, “Maybe they didn’t need such a big brain, because a brain is a very expensive organ, and maybe a smaller brain might work as well here in an island setting. But what is clear is that they made stone tools so they were not stupid.” The fossils uncovered date to about 700,000 years ago and were older than the Liang Bua fossils. Via ABC News Images via screenshot

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New ‘Hobbit’ fossils provide a glimpse into human relative

Did scientists just discover a new kind of ancient human?

January 29, 2015 by  
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Researchers recently discovered a fossilized jawbone that could have belonged to a new type of prehistoric human. The jawbone, originally found by fishermen in the Penghu Channel near Taiwan, has features which suggest it predates previously discovered hominids. Taiwanese fishermen found the fossilized jawbone and sold it to a local antique shop. Researchers later discovered the mandible, and were amazed when they realized what the bone could indicate. Read the rest of Did scientists just discover a new kind of ancient human? Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ancient hominids , ancient humans , ancient man , asia , bones , discovery , early man , evolution , fossilized human jawbone , fossils , history , human bones , News , prehistoric , research , science , Taiwan

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Did scientists just discover a new kind of ancient human?

Abandoned oil and gas wells are leaking methane across the USA

January 29, 2015 by  
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After the State of the Union  Address and the touting of the abundance of our natural resources , you’d probably think that our natural gas game in the U.S. is strong. Meanwhile, the big environmental organizations are going off about the Keystone XL Pipeline , and smaller grassroots non profits are fighting eminent domain (not to mention exploding ) pipelines like the Penn East and the Atlantic Sunrise, along with the air-polluting compressor station infrastructure that accompanies them. While all that’s going on, hundreds of thousands of abandoned oil and gas wells throughout the country are leaking extraordinary amounts of methane and being ignored by political leaders who continue to support “clean-burning” natural gas. Read the rest of Abandoned oil and gas wells are leaking methane across the USA Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: abandoned , air , Air quality , ban fracking , carbon dioxide , Climate Change , dangerous , DEP , department of Environmental Protection , Environment , environmental protection agency , epa , fossil fuels , fracking , gas , gas wells , government , greenhouse gases , health effects , leaking , McKean county , methane , natural gas , no frack , oil and gas , oil wells , PA , pennsylvania , Policy , princeton , regulations , renewable energy , research , shale gas , stanford , studies , united states , university , water issues

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Abandoned oil and gas wells are leaking methane across the USA

Nendo’s new Chocolatexture lets you taste the meaning of Japanese words

January 29, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Nendo’s new Chocolatexture lets you taste the meaning of Japanese words Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Chocolatexture , Designer of the Year , geometric , Japanese design , Maison&Objet , Nendo , textured chocolate

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Digital Mapping of Stonehenge Reveals Site Is More Massive Than We Thought

September 10, 2014 by  
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Previously unknown archaeological monuments have been discovered around Stonehenge as part of an enormous digital mapping project that has transformed scientists’ knowledge of this iconic landscape . A team from the University of Birmingham’s Stonehenge Hidden Landscape Project have used remote sensing techniques and geophysical surveys to map the area to a depth of three meters below ground, resulting in the most detailed archaeological digital map of Stonehenge and its surrounds ever produced. Startling new discoveries include 17 previously unknown ritual monuments dating to the period when Stonehenge was developed into its iconic ring shape. Read the rest of Digital Mapping of Stonehenge Reveals Site Is More Massive Than We Thought Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ancient monuments , archaeological dig , archaeological find , archaeologist , archaeology , burial mound , digital mapping , geophysical survey , prehistoric , Professor Vince Gaffney , remote sensing , Stonehenge , united kingdom , university of birmingham

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Digital Mapping of Stonehenge Reveals Site Is More Massive Than We Thought

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