Newly-discovered dinosaur species was as long as a school bus – and could help solve a mystery

January 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Newly-discovered dinosaur species was as long as a school bus – and could help solve a mystery

Fossils in Africa from the Late Cretaceous time period – around 100 to 66 million years ago – are rare. Scientists have been largely kept in the dark about the course of dinosaur evolution on the continent, but a new dinosaur species, Mansourasaurus shahinae , recently unearthed in the Sahara Desert in Egypt , now offers some clues. Carnegie Museum of Natural History dinosaur paleontologist Matt Lamanna said in a statement , “When I first saw pics of the fossils, my jaw hit the floor. This was the Holy Grail – a well-preserved dinosaur from the end of the Age of Dinosaurs in Africa – that we paleontologists had been searching for for a long, long time.” A team led by Hesham Sallam of Mansoura University in Egypt unearthed the fossils. Mansourasaurus shahinae was a long-necked dinosaur with bony plates in its skin, and consumed plants. According to a release from Ohio University, the new species belongs to a group of sauropods , Titanosaurs, which includes the largest land animals we know about. But Mansourasaurus was a moderate-sized titanosaur, weighing about as much as an African bull elephant. Ohio University said its skeleton is “the most complete dinosaur specimen so far discovered from the end of the Cretaceous in Africa” – parts of the skull, lower jaw, ribs, neck and back vertebrae, shoulder and forelimb, hind foot, and dermal plates were preserved. Related: How scaly dinosaurs turned into feathery birds – new gene study offers clues While it’s thrilling to find a new dinosaur species, there are other reasons why paleontologists are so excited about this find. During the Cretaceous Period, the continents joined together as the supercontinent Pangea started to split apart. The lack of a fossil record in Africa from the Late Cretaceous Period has been maddening for researchers who want to know how well-connected Africa was to Europe and Southern Hemisphere landmasses. Sallam and his team scrutinized the bones to determine, per the press release, the dinosaur was “more closely related to dinosaurs from Europe and Asia than it is to those found farther south in Africa or in South America” – so some of the creatures could have moved between Africa and Europe. The Field Museum postdoctoral research scientist Eric Gorscak, who was part of the study, said, “Africa’s last dinosaurs weren’t completely isolated, contrary to what some have proposed in the past. There were still connections to Europe.” The journal Nature Ecology and Evolution published the work online yesterday. 10 researchers from institutions in Egypt and the United States contributed. + Ohio University + Nature Ecology and Evolution Images via Andrew McAfee, Carnegie Museum of Natural History; Mansoura University; and Hesham Sallam, Mansoura University

Excerpt from:
Newly-discovered dinosaur species was as long as a school bus – and could help solve a mystery

NASA debuts KRUSTY nuclear reactor for future Mars residents

January 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on NASA debuts KRUSTY nuclear reactor for future Mars residents

Researchers at NASA , Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Department of Energy announced they have successfully tested a small nuclear reactor that may someday provide power to human habitats on Mars and beyond. Called Kilopower, or KRUSTY (Kilopower Reactor Using Stirling Technology), the reactor comes in several versions to meet certain power needs, from 1 kilowatt (enough to power a small kitchen appliance) to 10 kilowatts, four or five of which would be required to provide power for a habitat on Mars. “Kilopower’s compact size and robustness allows us to deliver multiple units on a single lander to the surface that provides tens of kilowatts of power,” said Steve Jurczyk, associate administrator of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, during a press conference on Thursday . Kilopower could support manned missions to Mars in several ways. “We would need power on Mars for two primary reasons,” said Patrick McClure, Project Lead for Reactor Development at Los Alamos, in the video above . “The first is that astronauts need power for their habitat, so that they can make oxygen , purify water, but prior to their arrival, we need to make liquid oxygen and propellant so that they can get off the Martian surface.” Kilopower provides a fairly straightforward solution, requiring a minimal number of parts and thus lightweight, for the power needs of any planet-bound mission. Related: MIT’s winning solar-powered dome tree habitats for Mars mimic earthly forests The system works by incorporating steam-pipe technology, in which a sealed tube in a heat pipe circulates fluid throughout the reactor while generating heat . The heated fluid then travels to a Stirling engine, where it pressurizes gas to power a piston connected to a motor that generates electricity . Combining these parts makes for a reliable, simple device for providing power for all kinds of space missions. As for next steps, the research team intends to conduct a full-power test of their device in March. If all goes well, the sky may well be the limit for this compact powerhouse. Via Engadget and Space.com Images via NASA (1)

View original post here:
NASA debuts KRUSTY nuclear reactor for future Mars residents

Scientists just created a new type of battery inspired by electric eels

January 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Scientists just created a new type of battery inspired by electric eels

Electric eels inspired an international team of researchers to develop soft power cells that could one day run pacemakers, health monitors, or one day even augmented-reality contact lenses. Their power source – which Smithsonian.com described as a foldable battery – can generate around 110 volts. Although that’s far less than an eel could produce, the researchers say their work could offer important insight into soft power sources. Electric eels can deliver a shock strong enough to knock a horse right off its feet, according to Smithsonian.com. This new soft power source isn’t that strong – but it could pave the way for powering devices without the concerns over toxicity or size associated with common batteries. University of Michigan , Adolphe Merkle Institute at the University of Fribourg , and University of California, San Diego researchers developed the power cell that “moves charged ions across a selective membrane to produce power.” Related: This robotic “eel” hunts down the source of water pollution The team made their foldable battery by printing different kinds of drops – composed of sodium and chloride dissolved in water-based hydrogel – on sheets. One sheet has salty and pure water drops alternating, while the other has charge-selective hydrogels, allowing “either positively charged sodium or negatively charged chloride to pass, excluding the other.” Pressing the sheets together generates power by connecting “saline and freshwater droplets across the charge-selective droplets in series. As the salty and fresh solutions mix, the charge-selective droplets move the sodium and chloride ions in opposing directions, producing an electric current.” The team improved on their work by incorporating a Miura fold, an origami technique. The Miura fold is in use today to transport solar panels in satellites so they can be easily unpacked into big sheets once they arrive in outer space. The team printed all four droplets on a sheet, laser-cut in a Miura fold pattern, that could then be folded to stack the droplets to generate electricity . University of Michigan professor of materials science and engineering Max Shtein said in a statement , “The eel polarizes and depolarizes thousands of cells instantaneously to put out these high voltages. It’s a fascinating system to look at from an engineering perspective – its performance metrics, its fundamental building blocks and how to use them.” The technology is still preliminary, but the team is working on boosting the power source’s efficiency. The journal Nature published the research online in December. + University of Michigan (1, 2) Via Smithsonian.com Images via Biophysics group, Adolphe Merkle Institute ; Caitlin Monney ; and Scott on Flickr

See more here: 
Scientists just created a new type of battery inspired by electric eels

US CO2 emissions declined during Trump’s first year as president

January 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on US CO2 emissions declined during Trump’s first year as president

What were United States carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions like in 2017, the first year President Donald Trump was in office? Based on preliminary estimates, the Rhodium Group said US emissions declined by just below one percent , thanks to changes in the energy sector. Electrek crunched the numbers and found 94.7 percent of net new electricity capacity came from renewables . But emissions from buildings , industry, and transportation increased – and America has a ways to go to meet Paris Agreement goals. Nearly 80 percent of reduction in American energy-related CO2 emissions between 2005 and 2016 are thanks to the electric power sector, according to the Rhodium Group. They said in an article, “Improved efficiency of buildings and appliances has helped flatten electricity demand, and coal has lost market share to lower-carbon natural gas and zero-carbon renewables. That trend continued in 2017.” Related: A ‘giant leap backward for humankind’ as CO2 emissions rise after years of stability The group said coal lost ground to other power sources. Solar , wind , and hydropower generation growth displaced coal and natural gas. Between January and October generation from the two more-polluting fuels fell by 138 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) compared against the same period the year before – and renewable generation increased by 75 million kWh. But energy-related CO2 emissions increased in other sectors – “offsetting more than one-quarter of the gains made in electric power,” according to the Rhodium Group. Even though Trump yanked America out of the Paris Accord , many states and cities said they’d stay in and work towards the United States’ goals. The Rhodium Group said, “Recent climate and clean energy policy developments at the state and city-level policy developments could potentially accelerate last year’s pace of emission reductions, while recent federal regulatory changes could slow that progress.” They said America seems to be on track to reach the 2009 Copenhagen Accord goal of 17 percent reduction under 2005 levels by 2020, as long as the country keeps up the one percent energy-related CO2 emissions decline and there are no big changes in other emissions. The Paris Agreement pledge was 26 to 28 percent reduction from 2005 levels by 2025. America is not on track to achieve that – the country would need an average annual reduction of 1.7 to two percent in energy-related CO2 emissions over the upcoming eight years. Via the Rhodium Group , Electrek , and Engadget Images via Depositphotos and Thomas Richter on Unsplash

See original here:
US CO2 emissions declined during Trump’s first year as president

New infrared communications channel is 300X more energy efficient than WiFi

January 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on New infrared communications channel is 300X more energy efficient than WiFi

ARON – or Augmented-Reality Optical Narrowcasting – is a new communications channel that operates without relying on cellular networks or the Internet , instead depending on infrared light. SureFire , a tactical equipment company, is debuting the technology that could be groundbreaking at the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show . The company says ARON is “300 times more energy efficient than Wi-Fi , and can operate on solar power .” ARON could change the way humans interact with the world, according to SureFire. The new communications system sends data via infrared light waves, using “a patented combination of optical beacons and signals.” Users can send any kind of digital information such as high-definition videos on the optical communications channel – as far away as 400 meters, or around 1,312 feet, in the daytime and 1,200 meters, or around 3,937 feet, at night, according to Engadget . Related: Ericsson’s new mixed-reality platform envisions urban design in “real life” ARON acts as an alternative to radio frequency waves, already used by smartphones , and is said to be secure and fast. The communications platform is as of now unregulated, potentially opening up a lot of opportunities for companies. SureFire’s video shows people utilizing the communications channel for augmented reality on smartphones, glasses, and car windshields. The company is also marketing ARON as useful during a natural disaster – it allows public information to flow even if the power is down, so first responders could reach trapped people, for example. Engadget pointed out it will take a while to deploy ARON on a large scale – someone would have to install sensors on buildings, freeways, or any other object or person needing to send data. They said the technology currently exists in demo form. SureFire’s video says the system can be installed in any car or mobile device, and “is inexpensive to deploy and use.” + ARON Via SureFire/PRNewswire and Engadget Images via Depositphotos and ARON video

Read the rest here:
New infrared communications channel is 300X more energy efficient than WiFi

YouTuber designs a DIY solar device to help power Puerto Rico

January 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on YouTuber designs a DIY solar device to help power Puerto Rico

Swaths of Puerto Rico still lack electricity . Jehu Garcia, film-making equipment company owner and YouTuber , wondered how he could help. He’s built his own do-it-yourself version of a Powerwall , and tackled the Puerto Rico power issue with his technical know-how by building a solar generator , and providing information for others to also build the DIY generators. Garcia created a solar generator , which he explained in his video is “essentially a small, lightweight, portable Powerwall .” The solar generator is a box “containing batteries , an inverter, a solar charge controller, and all kinds of different connectors to get the power in and out.” His 13-minute video details how to make the device, and the text below includes links to the various components a builder would need – costing around $550, a figure which includes the cost of a solar panel , an extension cord to connect the device to the panel, and around six light bulbs. “This is a complete system ready to deploy in Puerto Rico to light up a home and to give at least power communications or medical devices,” Garcia said in his video. The device can be equipped to offer around one kilowatt-hours worth of battery. Related: More than 20 organizations launch Solar Saves Lives to power clinics and food markets in Puerto Rico Garcia called for people to build the solar generators, and send completed devices or parts to Javier Camacho, a contact of Garcia’s in Puerto Rico. Camacho recorded a video sharing his experience on the island, saying, “We are at the mercy of the people that can actually put the grid on – or, we could help them. We could make something.” Camacho has access to a maker space, according to Garcia, with people who could build the solar generators. OZY reported there have been 15 installations so far. + Jehu Garcia on YouTube Images via Jehu Garcia on Instagram ( 1 , 2 )

Go here to see the original: 
YouTuber designs a DIY solar device to help power Puerto Rico

What business can do to celebrate human rights

December 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on What business can do to celebrate human rights

As we witness increased inequality, violence and discrimination, it is crucial that we use this moment to rediscover the power of principles.

Original post:
What business can do to celebrate human rights

What business can do to celebrate human rights

December 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on What business can do to celebrate human rights

As we witness increased inequality, violence and discrimination, it is crucial that we use this moment to rediscover the power of principles.

See more here:
What business can do to celebrate human rights

What business can do to celebrate human rights

December 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on What business can do to celebrate human rights

As we witness increased inequality, violence and discrimination, it is crucial that we use this moment to rediscover the power of principles.

Read the original here:
What business can do to celebrate human rights

What business can do to celebrate human rights

December 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on What business can do to celebrate human rights

As we witness increased inequality, violence and discrimination, it is crucial that we use this moment to rediscover the power of principles.

See the original post here:
What business can do to celebrate human rights

« Previous PageNext Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 4102 access attempts in the last 7 days.