High-altitude kites could generate 2x as much energy as traditional wind turbines

September 4, 2015 by  
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Right now, the vast majority of the wind power generated on the planet comes from land-based turbines. That is, a wind turbine that stands a certain height and arguably creates a bit of an eyesore wherever it is – and this effect is amplified in high-volume wind farms where many turbines are placed in groupings, like giant metal trees. New research into high-altitude wind power suggests that constant winds 300 meters (984 feet) above earth could be used to generate energy , which means the ground-based turbines could eventually be replaced with high-flying kites. Read the rest of High-altitude kites could generate 2x as much energy as traditional wind turbines

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High-altitude kites could generate 2x as much energy as traditional wind turbines

Wind Power Generated 126% of Scotland’s Household Energy Needs Last Month

November 6, 2014 by  
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According to new statistics released by the World Wildlife Fund Scotland , Scottish renewable energy had a “bumper month” in October, 2014, with wind power alone generating an estimated 982,842 MWh of electricity. This is enough clean energy to power around 3,045,000 homes, and equates to 126 percent of the electricity needs of Scottish households. Solar power and hot water generation also performed well, despite the country’s reputation for grey and misty weather. Read the rest of Wind Power Generated 126% of Scotland’s Household Energy Needs Last Month Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “wind power” , “wind turbine” , “World Wildlife Fund” , renewable energy , Scotland , Scotland produces 126% of household energy needs with wind power , solar hot water , Solar Power , wwf

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Wind Power Generated 126% of Scotland’s Household Energy Needs Last Month

Studiomama Gives Historic 18th Century Swedish Home a Monochromatic Makeover

November 6, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Studiomama Gives Historic 18th Century Swedish Home a Monochromatic Makeover Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , minimalist home , renovated historic home , renovated Medieval home , Stockholm , Studiomama , sustainable design , sustainable renovation , Sweden , Swedish design

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Studiomama Gives Historic 18th Century Swedish Home a Monochromatic Makeover

The Netherlands Unveils the World’s First Solar Bike Path

November 6, 2014 by  
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The Netherlands has an international reputation as a bike-friendly nation; it’s home to some 18 million bicycles and 21,748 miles of bike lanes. Now, an innovative project— SolaRoad —aims to make even greater use of all that green infrastructure by paving the bike paths with solar cells. On November 12, 2014, the first such path will open: a 70-meter (230 feet) stretch of Krommenie’s bike path will become the first solar-paved right of way in the world. Read the rest of The Netherlands Unveils the World’s First Solar Bike Path Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cycling , dutch , green energy , Netherlands , solar bike path , Solar cells , solar path , solar pavers , Solar Power , solar pv , solar road , solaroad , TNO

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The Netherlands Unveils the World’s First Solar Bike Path

The World’s Best Solar Power Regions are the Coldest Locales

October 25, 2011 by  
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Large expanses of desert have received most of the attention when it comes to large solar power installations, but a new study published in Environmental Science & Technology says that the world’s coldest regions are actually some of the best places for solar power generation. The study found that the Himalaya Mountains, the Andes and Antarctica are some of the most ideal solar power locations, with the ability to produce more energy per hectare than the world’s deserts .  The Himalayas could provide power to China, while the polar regions see 24 hours of sunlight a day for half the year. The study used weather data to account for any decrease in solar cell output due to freezing temperatures, snow fall and transmission losses when calculated the areas’ power generation potential. Research bases on Antarctica already successfully make use of solar and wind power for electricity, but transmitting power generated at the poles or deep in the Himalayas to places towns and cities will likely prove to be the biggest hurdle to these solar power “hot spots.” via Fast Company

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The World’s Best Solar Power Regions are the Coldest Locales

Atlantis Resources Corporation to develop 250MW tidal power plant in India

January 17, 2011 by  
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Eco Factor: Tidal power plant to help generate 250MW of renewable power for Indian state of Gujarat. London’s marine energy developer Atlantis Resources Corporation has signed a MoU with the government of Gujarat to set up India’s first commercial tidal power plant with an initial capacity of 50MW. The first phase of the power plant is expected to be completed by 2013 and will then be scaled up to a capacity of 250MW at a cost of about $165 million.

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Atlantis Resources Corporation to develop 250MW tidal power plant in India

Plug-In Solar Appliance Brings Cheap Solar Power to Homes

August 18, 2010 by  
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Solar power company Clarian Technologies has developed a new concept in residential solar power:  the solar appliance.  Just like a refrigerator or microwave, a homeowner can buy the Sunfish solar power system, plug it into any outdoor outlet and start feeding solar power into their home. Whereas most solar power systems require a contractor to install the module and an electrician to connect it to the electric panel through an inverter (to convert the DC power generated to AC power), Clarian says a handy homeowner can install the Sunfish themselves in about an hour. The other major bonus of such a plug-and-play-type system, is the cost.  Let’s face it, that’s the main draw.  The base model Sunfish will cost $799 with the largest running about $4,000, where a typical roof-mounted system costs a minimum of $10,000 and goes steeply up from there.

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Plug-In Solar Appliance Brings Cheap Solar Power to Homes

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