Chipotle reveals your Real Foodprint

November 2, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Chipotle reveals your Real Foodprint

For anyone who’s ever put a muffin back after seeing a posted calorie count in a restaurant, Chipotle’s new app helps further refine choices about what’s worth putting into your body. Real Foodprint tracks the environmental impact of adding a scoop of guacamole to your burrito bowl or saying no to the chicken. The new app assesses the impact along the lines of five metrics: savings in carbon emissions , measured in grams; water saved in gallons; soil health improvement in square feet; organic land supported in square feet; and milligrams of antibiotics avoided. Related: Chipotle debuts surprising new venture: sustainable clothing Independent research company HowGood is responsible for the data. HowGood drew on 450+ studies to compare conventional ingredients to the food available at Chipotle. This is the first time HowGood has partnered with a restaurant to provide the environmental tracking service. “Beyond asking people to make the right choice for the climate based on a carbon label, we are demonstrating the impact of our sourcing practices through data computed based on the ingredients in our guests’ orders,” said Caitlin Leibert, Chipotle’s head of sustainability, in a press release. “While our guests can make good choices for the planet by simply eating at Chipotle, the radical transparency provided by Real Foodprint also holds us accountable to improve our practices and source more sustainably over time. It is the combination of transparency for our guests and Chipotle’s commitment to higher standards that make Real Foodprint so impactful.” This is part of a trend among restaurants to provide customers with more environmental information. Panera recently started marking “Cool Food Meals” on menus, indicating choices with lower carbon footprints. Some parts of the app can be a little misleading. If you’re just going for a high score, you might choose Chipotle’s steak, which saves 150 milligrams of antibiotics compared to conventional meat. However, if you choose tofu — which doesn’t require antibiotics, conventional or otherwise — you won’t get those points. So customers still need to think a bit beyond the app about what’s really best for the health of their bodies and the planet. + Chipotle Via EcoWatch Images via Chipotle

Read the original:
Chipotle reveals your Real Foodprint

Burger King announces reusable container pilot program

October 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Burger King announces reusable container pilot program

If the ghosts of fast food containers past are haunting your conscience, Burger King has the solution. The fast food giant has announced a pilot plan to introduce reusable containers. Burger King is partnering with Loop , a circular packaging service owned by TerraCycle, to provide the new containers. Consumers can opt to pay a container deposit when buying a meal. When they return the packaging, they get a refund. Loop cleans the packaging, preparing it for a long life of housing infinite Whoppers and Cokes. The pilot program will go into effect next year in Tokyo, New York City and Portland, Oregon. If it goes well, more cities will soon know the joy of a recycled Whopper box. Related: Swiss grocery store chain will be the first to sell insect burgers “As part of our Restaurant Brands for Good plan, we’re investing in the development of sustainable packaging solutions that will help push the food service industry forward in reducing packaging waste ,” said Matthew Banton, Burger King Global’s head of innovation and sustainability. “The Loop system gives us the confidence in a reusable solution that meets our high safety standards, while also offering convenience for our guests on the go.” Burger King has set a goal of 100% of customer packaging being sourced from recycled, renewable or certified sources by 2025. The company is also trying to improve its waste diversion. By 2025, Burger King restaurants in the U.S. and Canada aim to recycle 100% of guest packaging. The pandemic has focused even more attention on packaging, since so many restaurants are closed for in-house dining. “During COVID, we have seen the environmental impact of increased takeaway ordering which makes this initiative by Burger King all the more important,” said Tom Szaky, TerraCycle and Loop CEO, as reported in BusinessWire . “This enables Burger King consumers to easily bring reusability into their daily lives, and whether they choose to eat-in or takeaway, they will be able to get some of their favorite food and drinks in a reusable container.” Via BusinessWire and Business Insider Image via Burger King / BusinessWire

The rest is here: 
Burger King announces reusable container pilot program

Companies in Japan launch edible single-use bags to save Nara deer

October 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Companies in Japan launch edible single-use bags to save Nara deer

Local companies in Nara, Japan have developed single-use bags made from milk cartons and rice bran that are safe if ingested by the city’s iconic deer. In 2019, multiple deer accidentally swallowed trash , namely plastic bags, that were littered by tourists. Several of the deer died, including one that had consumed nearly 9 pounds of waste. This prompted concerned entities to create a safer alternative to plastic packaging that can be digested without harm to the deer. The newly developed bags have been instrumental in saving the lives of the hundreds of deer that roam Nara. The bags are safe for deer, because the milk cartons and rice bran used to make these bags contain easy-to-digest ingredients. While there has been a decline in tourists and their plastic waste during the pandemic, the single-use bags still stand as a positive change to continue into the future. Related: Climate change is killing reindeer in the Arctic Tourists in Nara can purchase treats to feed the deer, and signs are posted warning visitors to only feed the deer approved treats that do not come in plastic packaging. Still, many tourists left behind waste that was consumed by the animals . After hearing of the deer that died from ingesting plastic , Hidetoshi Matsukawa, a local businessman, reached out to other firms with the interest of creating bags and packaging that would be safe in the event that they were eaten by the deer. “We made the paper with the deer in mind,” Matsukawa said. “ Tourism in Nara is supported by deer so we will protect them and promote the bags as a brand for the local economy.” The efforts to market the bags as a safe option for visitors to the city have been fruitful. About 35,000 bags have already been sold to local businesses and Nara’s tourism bureau. Since 1957, Japan has deemed the deer in Nara as national treasures that are protected by law, as they are considered divine messengers in the area. Via The Guardian Image via Matazel

Read the original:
Companies in Japan launch edible single-use bags to save Nara deer

New Swedish grocery to price goods based on carbon footprint

October 8, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on New Swedish grocery to price goods based on carbon footprint

Felix, a Swedish food brand, has opened a climate-conscious store that will guide buyers to make informed decisions when purchasing food items. In the newly opened store, items are priced based on their carbon footprint . To help buyers understand the impact of their choices on the environment, products in The Climate Store will be bought using carbon equivalents currency (CO2e). The store has allocated each customer a weekly budget of 18.9kg CO2e. This means that customers will have to choose foods carefully, avoiding options with higher carbon footprints to avoid blowing their budgets. Pricing foods based on their climate impact shows the difference between plant-based foods and animal-derived foods. Many of the foods that we consume are greatly contributing to the pollution of the environment. Although many people would love to make a difference by avoiding such foods, it’s not always clear which items are worse for the planet. Food production is responsible for about one-quarter of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. If customers can be aware of the foods that contribute most carbon, they can make decisions that will help reduce these emissions . Related: Precycle, a zero-waste grocery story, opens in Brooklyn “It will be exciting to see how customers react to trading with the CO2e currency and see if they manage to stay within their weekly budget,” Thomas Sjöberg, marketing manager for Felix, said. “I think it will be an eye-opener for many to see how certain choices affect what [they] can afford to get in the same lunch bag.” The opening of The Climate Store is just one part of the brand’s long-term sustainability plan. Felix intends to implement comprehensive features that will help its customers make informed choices when purchasing. Come this fall, the brand will be adding labels to all its products to indicate their impact on the environment. Felix expects such labels to help customers reduce the use of environmentally impactful products and increase the intake of plant-based products. Via VegNews and New Food Image via Pixabay

Excerpt from: 
New Swedish grocery to price goods based on carbon footprint

Google becomes retroactively carbon-neutral

September 15, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Google becomes retroactively carbon-neutral

Google announced that it has now invested in enough high-quality carbon offsets to essentially erase its carbon footprint , compensating for all the carbon the company ever emitted. Google first became carbon-neutral in 2007. The goal is for all of Google’s offices and data centers to run on carbon-free energy by 2030. “We’ll do things like pairing wind and solar power sources together and increasing our use of battery storage,” said chief executive Sundar Pichai, according to BBC . “And we’re working on ways to apply AI [ artificial intelligence ] to optimize our electricity demand and forecasting.” Pichai’s plan could create 12,000 more jobs over the next five years. Related: Humans can’t count on rainforests to offset their carbon “Today’s announcement, combined with Google’s promise in May to no longer create artificial intelligence solutions for upstream oil and gas exploration, shows that Google takes its role in combating climate change seriously,” said Elizabeth Jardim, senior corporate campaigner for Greenpeace USA. This is all good news. However, the idea of offsetting all the company’s past use of carbon may not hold up when you take a closer look. Google’s offsets have so far focused on capturing natural gas that escapes from landfills and pig farms. As BBC points out, isn’t this something governments should be enforcing already? Planting trees to capture carbon dioxide, a popular offset strategy, also has its problems, such as ensuring that those trees never burn down or are felled. Google’s fellow tech giants have also announced plans to reduce or eliminate their carbon use. Microsoft plans to be carbon-negative by 2030. Amazon said it will be carbon-neutral by 2040, and Apple plans to have an entirely carbon-neutral business and manufacturing supply chain by 2030. And where the giants lead, smaller companies are apt to follow. Via BBC Image via Pawe? Czerwi?ski

Read more: 
Google becomes retroactively carbon-neutral

Halo Top debuts new and improved vegan ice cream recipe

September 15, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Halo Top debuts new and improved vegan ice cream recipe

Vegans often face limited options for frozen treats. Sure, you can put a banana in the freezer, get a little fancier with a sorbet or maybe cool off with some vegan frozen yogurt. But now, thanks to Halo Top’s new line of vegan ice cream flavors, consumers can enjoy a range of choices with the creamy texture that makes ice cream summer’s perfect treat. Halo Top has offered vegan ice cream for years. The company’s new line features an improved taste and texture that feels more like real ice cream. Starting with a coconut milk base, the recipe also contains fava bean protein, which gives the ice cream a creamy texture. Previously, Halo Top used brown rice protein in its vegan ice cream creations. The switch to fava bean protein lends the ice cream a better texture that allows every flavor to stand out. Halo Top also swapped out the soluble corn fiber in its old recipe for inulin. Stevia provides the recipe with sweetness. Halo Top’s line of dairy-free ice cream introduces several flavors, including sea salt caramel. This mix of sweet and salty comes in at under 340 calories per pint. The flavor line also includes peanut butter cup, chocolate almond crunch, chocolate chip cookie dough, classic chocolate, candy bar and birthday cake. Each flavor’s calorie count stands between 280 to 380 calories per pint. The fava bean protein provides every pint with 10 to 20 grams of protein. The flavors will debut in grocery stores in September and October, in two different release waves. This line is exactly what vegans have been waiting for: ice cream that tastes like the real thing. Even better, this line includes a variety of flavors packed with protein, but not calories. Get your spoons ready and prepare to enjoy this new plant-based offering from Halo Top. + Halo Top Via Plant Based News Image via PR Newswire

Read more here: 
Halo Top debuts new and improved vegan ice cream recipe

Bad Behavior has blocked 3214 access attempts in the last 7 days.