Hairy micro-office teleports you to a world of calm

January 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Hairy micro-office teleports you to a world of calm

We’ve seen our fair share of unusual architecture , but this “hairy” building is a first. UK-based 2hD Architecture Workshop designed a surreal structure called “Mission Control” that’s entirely clad in brown bristles and appears to be mysteriously void of any doors or windows. Created as a micro-office and haven for concentration, the workspace located in a Nottingham garden is described by the architects as “an exercise in teleportation, designed to take us from the everyday hurly burly to another world, one of calm, quiet, and focus.” Built to replace a derelict glazed shed of the same size, Mission Control was constructed as a freestanding workspace extension of 2hD Architecture Workshop’s home office . Unlike the collaborative home office environment, Mission Control functions as an isolation chamber for uninterrupted concentration. The architects describe the short walk from the home office to the new micro-office—a distance of 13 feet—as an important “ceremonial commute” for leaving distractions behind and getting into the working mindset. “We built this custom-designed structure as the antithesis of a ‘contemplation space with landscape views and flowing inside-outside space’,” said the architects. “In contrast, we needed an almost monastic cell, removed from physical context and worldly distraction, where we could retreat to immerse ourselves in brain work.” Related: You can build one of these tiny backyard offices in less than a week for under $7000 Interlocking natural coco-fiber broom heads cover the outer facade of the 75-square-foot micro-office and create a visually seamless surface with a well-hidden door. The “hairy” exterior sheathes a pitched structure with a sloping roof made with polycarbonate and punctuated by an operable skylight to let in natural light and ventilation. Inside, whitewashed plywood clads the walls and ceilings that are wrapped with sheep’s wool insulation. Two back-to-back desks are placed beneath the low ceiling. + 2hD Architecture Workshop Images by Thibaut Devulder and Tom Hughes

Read more from the original source: 
Hairy micro-office teleports you to a world of calm

Luminous Bear Run Cabin offers dramatic views of the Cascade Mountains in Washington

December 8, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Luminous Bear Run Cabin offers dramatic views of the Cascade Mountains in Washington

The Bear Run Cabin in Marblemount, Washington, captures the dual nature of the surrounding landscape – the dramatic peaks of the Cascade Mountains and the gently sloping adjacent woodlot. The building, designed by David Coleman Architecture , is carved into the site, with two volumes standing in a yin-yang relationship. The cabin occupies a rain-drenched site in the rugged, northwestern foothills of the Cascade Mountains. Its western terrace is carved into the site, and it leads towards a soaking tub set behind a glass wall . The south-eastern porch and monumental stair, both covered by a soaring roof, rise above the site and offer shelter from the rain and summer sun. Related: Son builds modern dream cabin from recycled materials for his aging father The house is extremely flexible – in the summer the living space expands onto porches and terraces while retaining its efficiency and compactness in the winter. The 890-square-foot cabin accommodates a living room, a bath, and a sleeping loft clad in frameless glass, while the 1000-square-foot studio houses a music room, a workshop and a guest loft. Related: Affordable Polycarbonate Cabin is a light-filled vacation home in Chile The west wall is clad in a polycarbonate skin that illuminates the interior with a soft glow during the day. This same wall lights up in a dramatic display at night. The project won the GRAY Awards — the first regional awards program to celebrate design exclusively from Washington , Oregon and British Columbia. + David Coleman Architecture Photos by Ben Benschneider

Originally posted here:
Luminous Bear Run Cabin offers dramatic views of the Cascade Mountains in Washington

Compact New Zealand home sets its sights on going off the grid

September 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Compact New Zealand home sets its sights on going off the grid

High on a hill above New Zealand’s idyllic Peka Peka beach sits an eco-friendly compact home that responds to the surrounding landscape. Herriot Melhuish O’Neill Architects designed the dwelling, named Peka Peka House I, as three boxy units perfectly positioned to maximize shelter as well as views of Kapiti Island, forestry, and farmland. In response to the client’s desires to eventually go off-grid, the home is equipped with photovoltaic panels, solar hot water panels, above-code insulation, and other energy-saving features. Herriot Melhuish O’Neill Architects separated the living, sleeping, and garage functions into three interconnected box-like volumes, each positioned in response to climate and views. Two of the boxes are clad in black-stained cedar ; one contains the living functions, while the other comprises bedrooms. The third box is clad in profiled polycarbonate and contains the garage and workshop. At night, the polycarbonate-clad volumes glows like a lantern. Timber decking surrounds the three volumes. Related: Dreamy cabin is a luxurious escape in the New Zealand bush The cedar-clad boxes are arranged to form a sheltered north-facing courtyard that provides views towards the sea and is protected from coastal winds. “As requested by our knowledgeable clients, the house promotes some eco values in the form of a combination of PV and solar hot water panels and above code insulation,” wrote the architects. “Their long-term ambition is to go off-grid. LED lighting throughout and exposed and insulated concrete slab as a heat store helps reduce power consumption. Natural ventilation picks up the consistent afternoon sea breezes.” + Herriot Melhuish O’Neill Architects Via ArchDaily Images by Jason Mann

Read the original:
Compact New Zealand home sets its sights on going off the grid

Mobile Smartdome homes pop up almost anywhere starting at 20k

May 31, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Mobile Smartdome homes pop up almost anywhere starting at 20k

Dome homes are durable, efficient, and—above all—fun to live in. Now you can get your hands on your very own mobile dome home with Slovenian firm smartdome construction . Available in a variety of styles, the Smartdome consists of prefabricated modules engineered for energy efficiency and designed for the enjoyment of nature lovers and DIY enthusiasts. Built on a set of adjustable steel legs, the elevated Smartdome sits lightly on the land with the option of placement in degraded and difficult terrain. Thanks to its modular design , the homes can be easily expanded, dismantled, and transported to new locations with little technical knowledge needed. The base Smartdome model measures 25 square meters with a starting cost of 19,900€. Related: These gorgeous glass homes can pop up in 8 hours for under $50k “The project is really something fresh and different […] for every nature lover,” said Željko Ho?evar of smartdome construction to Inhabitat. “It’s the first printed dodecahedron structure in the world.” The modules are constructed from galvanized steel and a laminated and moisture-resistant timber framework sealed with UV-resistant rubber gaskets. Buyers can choose between transparent modules with two or three-layer thermoformed polycarbonate or opaque versions filled with mineral wool or space-tech foil. All Smartdome homes are designed, engineered, and manufactured in Slovenia. + smartdome construction

Read the original post:
Mobile Smartdome homes pop up almost anywhere starting at 20k

Austin Maynard Architects restores a beach shack in their crusade against McMansions

February 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Austin Maynard Architects restores a beach shack in their crusade against McMansions

Austin Maynard Architects is taking a stand against McMansions. Tired of seeing Australia’s handsome old shacks demolished to make way for less culturally interesting housing, the Australian architecture firm completed a beautiful renovation and addition to an old beach shack in the town of Lorne. The restored project, called the Dorman House, is a lovely celebration of the Australian beach shack vernacular with stunning ocean views and a modern and eco-friendly design. The Dorman House comprises two parts: the restoration of an old post-war beach shack that remains mostly unchanged, and the addition of a contemporary new extension. The clients, Kate and Grant, had asked Austin Maynard Architects to preserve the original shack and add an extension that would allow for clear and elevated ocean views without dominating or damaging the existing structure. Although the simplest solution would have been to bulldoze the existing shack and start anew, the architects and clients sought the more sustainable solution. “Modest, humble shacks are being replaced with incongruous and unnecessary McMansions ,” wrote the architects. “Increasingly we see a duplication of the suburban home where once stood the shack. Through this process we not only lose important parts of our built heritage, we also lose a significant part of our social and emotional diversity. We lose parts of ourselves. At Austin Maynard Architects we do our best to avoid the simple temptation of demolishing and replacing. Where extensions are required/desired, we aim to retain and respect the existing shack and its scale.” Related: Gorgeous solar-powered THAT House is an eco-friendly rebel “with just enough space” The new extension is an elevated timber box that sits atop the original shack and comprises an open-plan kitchen, dining, and living room accessed via a spiral staircase. The interior is lined with Silvertop Ash and opens up to gorgeous ocean views and breezes through full-height windows. Most of the glass faces north and all windows are double glazed with thermally separated frames, while solar shades are in place to minimize solar heat gain in summer. The exterior cladding will develop a gray patina over time. The structure directly below the timber box is clad in polycarbonate and is used as a light-filled bedroom. Recycled timber decking was used in the construction and locally sourced materials were also used wherever possible. + Austin Maynard Architects Images via Austin Maynard Architects

Originally posted here: 
Austin Maynard Architects restores a beach shack in their crusade against McMansions

Glowing LED "cloud" hovers over a social housing estate in Copenhagen

October 14, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Glowing LED "cloud" hovers over a social housing estate in Copenhagen

The main element of this site-specific installation is a distorted sphere made from polycarbonate sheets sewn together with stainless steel wire. The team developed the sewing technique from their previous projects, which featured only two sewing lines. This time, the sphere has three points where the sewing lines meet, allowing the team to experiment with more complex forms. Related: SHJWORKS’ Pop-Up Greenhouses Add a Splash of Summer to Cold Climates The organically-shaped sculpture was installed in a recreational space surrounded by a road, trees and the housing estate. A paved path leads through the area, where the structure creates a semi-public space. The concrete feet act as seating structures. + Shjworks Photos by Simon Hjermind Jensen

See more here: 
Glowing LED "cloud" hovers over a social housing estate in Copenhagen

WeWorks new coworking space in Shanghai features salvaged materials from the citys past

September 22, 2016 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on WeWorks new coworking space in Shanghai features salvaged materials from the citys past

Despite its cosmopolitan appearance, Shanghai still retains much of its historic architecture. Longtang (??), or alleyways, are a major part of the urban fabric and refer to the community of homes grouped along an alley. Linehouse references the site’s history as a former neighborhood of longtangs with sectionally cut house-like structures. A gabled skeleton layered with light-filtering polycarbonate panels frames the interior’s central alley-like space. The house-like structure repeats itself in the seating areas, pantry, and reception with white-and-blue metal bars. Related: Abandoned 1920s bank is transformed into a luxurious coworking space Salvaged TVs and radios—objects commonly found in Shanghai’s laneways—were upcycled into a funky reception desk. An open shelving unit made of rebar, in addition to the metal framing and e-waste desk, inserts an industrial vibe to WeWork Yanping Lu that’s tempered by timber floors and furnishings that add a touch of warmth. A giant blue-tinted fish tank enlivens the space. The restrained use of polycarbonate, timber, and metal materials ensures a clean backdrop for the addition of custom graphics without fear of visual clutter. “Inspired by Shanghai’s White Rabbit candy, a motif of rabbit wallpapers and artwork was developed,” write the architects. “Meeting room wallpapers take reference from common Chinese games played in the laneways; Chinese chess and tangram. Motifs often seen in the streets of Shanghai are stamped throughout the public seating areas, playing on Chinese and English words encapsulating the community spirit of WeWork.” WeWork Yanping Lu is open 24/7 with two floors and around 500 seats. + Linehouse Via ArchDaily Images via Linehouse , © Dirk Weiblen

More here: 
WeWorks new coworking space in Shanghai features salvaged materials from the citys past

Old slaughterhouse in Madrid is turned into an incubator for creative startups

July 4, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Old slaughterhouse in Madrid is turned into an incubator for creative startups

Built in the early 20th century, the Matadero Madrid served as a slaughterhouse and livestock market until it fell into disuse near the end of the century. The building was renovated several times under different leadership until Madrid’s City Council decided to allocate the space for sociocultural purposes. OSS’ intervention, completed in 2014, turned the complex into a creative startup hub for the extremely low budget of 105 Euros per square meter in a little under a month. Related: Renovated Paris Rail Station Will House 1000 Start-Ups! Factoría Cultural houses 120 workspaces across two floors—the architects constructed the second 85-square-meter floor using local pine lumber and multi-wall polycarbonate —outfitted with custom-designed furniture also made with untreated pinewood. LED ceiling lamps that splay out from overhead were made from waste wood. “Factoría Cultural is a reversible architecture work, which empowers, with no side effect, the visual and technical virtues of the existing El Matadero Madrid, an industrial architectural heritage site,” write the architects. “It is a space that requires minimal maintenance and, in the event Factoría’s activity ceases, it can be removed without waste.” + Office for Strategic Spaces Images by Simona Rota

The rest is here: 
Old slaughterhouse in Madrid is turned into an incubator for creative startups

Temporary Market Hall made from sustainable materials pops up Stockholm

June 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Temporary Market Hall made from sustainable materials pops up Stockholm

The pop-up Market Hall was created as a temporary home for the vendors of the old Market Hall , which is currently undergoing renovations under the direction of Tengbom. The architects decided to build the temporary food market on Östermalm’s Square, a busy thoroughfare that was once the original location of the old Market Hall until the municipality forced its move in 1888. Though the government’s decision to place the pop-up Market Hall in the square was due to a lack of suitable spaces, the placement has actually helped bring new life to the area and increased the visibility of the market vendors. “It’s quite a remarkable and historic situation which we’re proud and happy to be part of,” said the architects. “From Stockholm city’s perspective it was important to turn the temporary loss of urban space into a positive addition to the urban fabric . We did this by applying considerable care to the design of the building. It required a sense of quality suitable to the local context and the historic Market Hall while using lightweight, cost efficient and sustainable materials befitting the temporary nature of the building.” The pop-up building is clad in vertical strips of untreated pine on the first level, while the upper levels are covered in a modular system of translucent multi-wall polycarbonate sheeting that allows natural light to penetrate through during the daytime and gives the building a glowing effect at night. Large glazed doors along the southwest corner and the east facade provide views into the Market Hall. The building’s modular mounting system of steel brackets enables quick construction and dismantling. Related: MVRDV’s Gorgeous Tunnel-Shaped Market Hall Opens its Doors in Rotterdam The light-filled interior features market stalls, restaurants and storage on the ground floor. The kitchens and technical installations are located on the two mezzanines. Entrances and exits are strategically located on all four sides of the building to allow pedestrian traffic to flow through the square during opening hours. + Tengbom Images via Tengbom , by Felix Gerlach

Read the rest here:
Temporary Market Hall made from sustainable materials pops up Stockholm

Malaysia just established a massive 1-million-hectare marine park

June 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Malaysia just established a massive 1-million-hectare marine park

After over 13 years of negotiation and planning between conservation groups, the government, and the fishing industry, Malaysia recently established a massive 1-million-hectare marine park. The new one million-hectare Tun Mustapha Park, located by the Sabah Province in the Coral Triangle, is home to endangered species such as dugongs and green turtles. About 360 fish species, over 250 hard coral species, and vegetation such as mangroves add to the richness of this ocean space. Unsustainable fishing practices such as blast fishing had damaged the area, but a 2012 research team discovered that out of the reefs they examined, about 57 percent could be classified as ” excellent ” or ” good .” However, they also noted pollution and heard 15 bombs from blast fishing. They didn’t see many sharks or sea turtles, which is typically a signal that an ecosystem is struggling. Related: Scientists discover a 600-mile-long coral reef in the most unlikely place The fishing industry profits from being able to use the area, but so do local communities. Around 80,000 people survive off fishing in the region. As officials worked out the details of the Tun Mustapha Park, they had to balance conservation with the needs of locals. Their solution is designated fishing zones for ” sustainable uses “, which were set up with the input of the fishing industry and locals. The Sabah Parks department confirms the park will be “a multiple use, managed area” with spots for artisanal and commercial fishing as well as areas under “strict protection.” According to World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Malaysia, damaged regions will be allowed to recover. This could take three to five years for areas that haven’t been too badly harmed, but five to ten years for areas in worse condition. There’s also potential for ecotourism : with 50 islands in the Tun Mustapha Park, visitors could enjoy activities from diving to volunteering in turtle nesting locations to lounging on white sand beaches. WWF International Director General Marco Lambertini said , “The Park’s gazettement should act as a model and an inspiration for marine conservation in the Coral Triangle and worldwide.” Via The Guardian Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

Go here to read the rest: 
Malaysia just established a massive 1-million-hectare marine park

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 4120 access attempts in the last 7 days.