This rustic Norwegian cabin looks like four different buildings all joined together

February 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This rustic Norwegian cabin looks like four different buildings all joined together

This rustic cottage in Norway looks like a patchwork of different buildings, all mashed together to create a cohesive home. The building, designed by Oslo-based studio Rever & Drage Architects , comprises a sequence of distinct spaces, each one addressing a different daily need of the owners. The cabin has a transparent garage that acts as an entry point and storage area where the family can leave their gear for various outdoor activities. This space leads to a laundry area, bathroom, and kitchen and into the main lounge that offers views of the surrounding landscape. Related: Coastal cabin in Norway is a perfect indoor retreat for outdoor lovers Each of the spaces uses different cladding materials and construction techniques, with the imperative of being able to withstand the harsh weather as an overarching design principle. The cabin, in a way, can be seen as a single building or four separate structures. “The outside composition is that of a traditional row farm, where buildings with different functions and different construction techniques are arranged in a line corresponding with the dominant direction of wind,” explained the architects. Related: Fantastic Norway’s Mountain Hill Cabin is Part Ski Slope, Part Winter Retreat While the north part was built using a late-medieval building technique with large, narrowing logs, the living room features more elegant 19th century notched logs, all stained in a dark tar finish. The kitchen has a contemporary feel, with a green roof. The garage, at the southern end of the building, features an exposed timber frame and polycarbonate sheets to let in tons of light all year long. + Rever & Drage Architects Via Dezeen Photos by Tom Auger

Read more from the original source:
This rustic Norwegian cabin looks like four different buildings all joined together

ICEBERGS immerse visitors in a beautiful underwater world in Washington, D.C.

July 13, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on ICEBERGS immerse visitors in a beautiful underwater world in Washington, D.C.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMJCd04ehKc ? Created as part of the National Building Museum’s Summer Block Party series, the 12,540-square-foot ICEBERGS project comprises over 30 geometric, iceberg-shaped elements in a variety of sizes ranging from 16 feet to 56 feet in height. Some of the triangular pentahedron and octahedron “icebergs” are suspended in the air, while others appear to float. The jagged landscape was constructed from prefabricated units made from reusable scaffolding and translucent polycarbonate paneling . White slides punctuate some icebergs as a playful interactive feature. ? “ICEBERGS invokes the surreal underwater-world of glacial ice fields,” said James Corner, founder and director of James Corner Field Operations. “Such a world is both beautiful and ominous given our current epoch of climate change , ice-melt, and rising seas. The installation creates an ambient field of texture, movement, and interaction, as in an unfolding landscape of multiples, distinct from a static, single object.” Related: Gigantic swimmable ball pit takes over D.C.’s National Building Museum ? Visitors can experience ICEBERGS from the Great Hall floor that’s punctuated with triangular beanbags, caverns, and grottoes, or from a higher level where they can look down at the “water line” suspended 20 feet in the air. The tallest “iceberg” rises to the height of 56 feet and includes a viewing area. To complement the installation, the Daikaya restaurant provides Japanese ‘kakigori’ shaved ice treats. The installation opened July 2, 2016 and will run until September 5, 2016. + James Corner Field Operations + National Building Museum Images by Timothy Schenck

Read the original post:
ICEBERGS immerse visitors in a beautiful underwater world in Washington, D.C.

These two arboretum buildings were built using waste timber sourced and milled on-site

April 13, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on These two arboretum buildings were built using waste timber sourced and milled on-site

Read the rest of These two arboretum buildings were built using waste timber sourced and milled on-site

Read more: 
These two arboretum buildings were built using waste timber sourced and milled on-site

Alvaro Siza’s Solar-Powered Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Illuminated by Polycarbonate Panels

August 11, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Alvaro Siza’s Solar-Powered Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Illuminated by Polycarbonate Panels

Read the rest of Alvaro Siza’s Solar-Powered Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Illuminated by Polycarbonate Panels Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Alvaro Siza Vieira , Ceil Balmond Arup , eco design , Eduardo Souto de Moura , green design , Hyde Park , London , Polycarbonate Panels , serpentine gallery , solar panels , sustainable design , temporary structures

View original here: 
Alvaro Siza’s Solar-Powered Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Illuminated by Polycarbonate Panels

Solar Mission House embodies daylight design with efficient green building strategies

September 16, 2010 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Solar Mission House embodies daylight design with efficient green building strategies

Eco Factor : Solar Mission House uses smart passive solar strategies to become energy efficient. Interstice Architects have tinkered with a number of experimental materials, systems and construction techniques to build energy efficient Mission House that optimizes use of whatever little sunshine it gets during the day

Excerpt from:
Solar Mission House embodies daylight design with efficient green building strategies

Bad Behavior has blocked 5709 access attempts in the last 7 days.