Dark highway underpass transformed into a brilliant tunnel of light

January 9, 2018 by  
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Design studio antyRAMA collective converted a dark underpass in the city of Katowice, Poland, into a colorful neon-lit sound installation. The music tunnel, illuminated by polychromatic LED lights , houses an inventive structure made from hanging PVC pipes that form the shape of a sound wave. The PVC pipes, hung from the ceiling of the underpass , are rocked by the strong breeze that passes through the tunnel and hit each other to create a variety of sound effects. Passersby have the opportunity to interact with the structure and put the hanging pipes in motion. Related: Amazing Hive comes alive with sights and sounds in Washington, D.C. The installation consists of 2018 white PVC pipes suspended on different lengths of a steel wire rope attached to a net placed just under the ceiling. The composition of the tubes creates waves similar to the recording of sound waves and gets denser as it exits towards the Wojewódzka street. Twenty-three new points of colorful LED light have also been added, which effectively illuminate the area and create a unique ambiance. The project pays homage to the musical tradition of Katowice, which was named Creative City by UNESCO. Its interactive nature reflects the evolution of the city’s music which had for centuries connected people from different corners of the world and different cultures. + antyRAMA collective

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Dark highway underpass transformed into a brilliant tunnel of light

Too much antimatter is hitting Earth and scientists aren’t sure why

November 21, 2017 by  
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Among the cosmic rays that normally immerse the Earth, scientists say there are too many high-energy positrons, the antimatter counterparts of electrons. Now a group of researchers from the United States, Mexico, Germany, and Poland are attempting to shed light on the mystery, and if they’re right, according to the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN), the excess positrons might be “the first particles recorded by humans to be derived from the interaction of dark matter .” In 2008, a probe in our planet’s orbit detected more positrons reaching us than scientists would anticipate. So a large team conducted observations at the recently activated High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory in Mexico to see if pulsars were the source of these baffling extra positrons. They analyzed data from two relatively close pulsars around 800 and 900 light years away. These pulsars, Geminga and PSR B0656+14, are “among the strongest sources of cosmic rays in our region of the galaxy,” according to IFJ PAN. Related: Scientists observe light spectrum of antimatter for the first time ever The pulsars, albeit responsible for some of the positrons, contributed too small an amount to account for all the antimatter hitting Earth. Instead, the researchers’ observations bolstered a competing hypothesis IFJ PAN described as much more exotic: the “annihilation or decay or dark matter” could be the origin of the positrons. If the hypothesis is correct – and we won’t know for sure until future observations back it up or not – these perplexing positrons would be the first particles we’ve ever recorded coming from the interaction of dark matter. The journal Science recently published the research . The University of Utah led the international team. Via the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences and ScienceAlert Images via John Pretz/IFJ PAN and Jordan A. Goodman/IFJ PAN

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Too much antimatter is hitting Earth and scientists aren’t sure why

This prefab Escape Pod rotates to catch the suns rays

November 21, 2017 by  
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Dreaming of your very own backyard escape? The cozy Escape Pod may be just what you’re looking for. UK-based firm Podmakers designed and crafted the Escape Pod, a cedar shingle-clad prefabricated unit that can be tailored to suit a variety of uses, including garden room and writer’s studio. The spherical unit takes inspiration from nature, from its round organic shape to the extensive use of timber inside and out. Designed to meet local UK planning laws, each 7-square-meter Escape Pod is built offsite in a Gloucestershire workshop and then delivered and installed using a forklift or crane. The pod is elevated half a meter off the ground and can be rotated to optimize natural light and views through European Oak-framed windows. An aircraft-style plug door opens up to a snug adaptable interior outfitted with insulation, electrical wiring, and heating (choice of a wood-burning stove or underfloor heating). “The organic nature of the Escape Pod’s materials contrasts with the engineering employed in its design,” write Podmakers. “To achieve its curved form, the pod’s design exploits innovative CNC milling and making techniques. This enables it to be fabricated with precision in the workshop, entirely from wood. Birch plywood , chosen for its strength and aesthetic qualities, forms the structure. It is exposed internally; from the pod’s framework to the bespoke laminated door hinge.” Related: Archipod’s Spherical Garden Office Pod The base price for the Escape Pod starts at £19,800. Podmakers developed four recommended layouts—garden room, office, snug (bedroom), and work studio—however the pod can be customized to meet different needs. + Podmakers Via ArchDaily Images © Tim Brotherton

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This prefab Escape Pod rotates to catch the suns rays

Greenhouse-like ‘cabin in the woods’ features lush vertical gardens inside

September 1, 2017 by  
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If greenery is essential for creating a healthy home design , the family that moves into this green-filled home will be in really great shape. Designed by Kartick Reddy , the sophisticated design integrates multiple pockets of vibrant greenery inside and outside of the home, including multiple vertical gardens within the living space. The contemporary home design , which was created for a family in Poland, is oozing greenery at every corner. Sitting on a large lot of verdant green forestscape, the home is located next to a calming stream. Wood panels cover the rear facade of the modern A-frame home while the front facade is almost entirely comprised of large glass panels, giving the home a greenhouse-like appearance. Related: Create a vertical garden on your window or wall in minutes with these adorable Livi planters On the interior, two living walls were used to bring a boost of nature into the home environment. Visitors are greeted with a large living wall through the back entrance and another vertical green wall rises up almost two floors in the middle of the home. The greenery, along with the abundance of glass walls blends this modern homeinto its idyllic surroundings. + Kartik Reddy Via Yanko Designs Images by Kartik Reddy

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Greenhouse-like ‘cabin in the woods’ features lush vertical gardens inside

Ultralight NAWA sculpture continually changes its appearance throughout the day

June 27, 2017 by  
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Bionics, art, and public space merge in NAWA, a striking sculpture designed by Oskar Zi?ta of Zieta Prozessdesign for the European Capital of Culture 2016 celebrations. Created to match the celebrations’ slogan of “metamorphoses of culture,” this ultralight mirrored installation changes it appearance, which differs depending on where viewers stand and the time of day. The unveiling of the avante-garde sculpture on Daliowa Island of Wroc?aw in western Poland will take place on June 30, 2017. Inspired by bionic shapes, the 100-square-meter NAWA comprises 35 steel arches of varying sizes to create an openwork gate through which people can walk. The polished steel arches reflect the changing surroundings, thus giving the sculpture a continually changing appearance. The choice of arches is also a reference to the nearby landmarks including the Ossolineum, the church’s tower at Piasek, Wroclaw Market Hall, and Ostrów Tumski. “NAWA opens another chapter in the history of the Daliowa Island, returning it to the dwellers of Wroclaw,” wrote Zieta Prozessdesign. “The space is currently being revitalized and very soon will serve the city, becoming a bustling, open space for meetings, concerts and artistic events. Sculpture along with planned vegetation will create a consistent organic unity, emerging naturally from the river. At the same time, the realization will fit perfectly into the architectural order of the area and its vibrant life, full of tourists and passers-by.” Related: Tiny Mirrored Cabin Reflects the Ontario Landscape NAWA is ultra-lightweight thanks to FiDU, an innovative technology developed by Zieta Prozessdesign that distorts welded steel with compressed air. Almost 52 tonnes of steel and a million cubic meters of air were used for the sculpture. In addition to the installation of NAWA, around 7,500 new plants will be seeded on Daliowa Island. + Zieta Prozessdesign

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Ultralight NAWA sculpture continually changes its appearance throughout the day

Czech archaeological museum springs out of the ground like a modern-day cave system

November 29, 2016 by  
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In a project that joins modern architecture with ancient archaeological finds, the Czech Republic’s new Archeopark in Pavlov houses a museum where visitors can get an up-close look at many Paleolithic-era tools as well as skeletal remains of early humans and their artwork. The brainchild of Czech architects Radko Kv?t and Pavel Pijá?ek , the museum’s design is unique, as multiple parts of the structure appear to spring forth from the ground themselves, just as their precious archaeological treasures did. The Archeopark museum opened this year, with more than 10,000 square feet of exhibits that tell the story of early human evolution, and most of the museum is actually underground. Paleolithic artifacts are common to this region of Europe, and the majority of the items on display within the Archeopark were found within a small radius of the museum site. Exhibits include early tools made from stone and bone, the skeletal remains of anatomically modern humans, as well as the artwork produced by those same civilizations. Related: Poland’s National Museum in Szczecin wins World Building of the Year 2016 The museum ‘s design is decidedly modern, with sharp and unexpected angles at every turn. From the outside, the museum structures appear cold, harsh, and blank—concrete shapes dotting the site like a child’s discarded jacks. Oak and glass round out the building materials, confirming the museum’s understated style. Inside the museum, pitched ceilings with odd angles, winding pathways, and the occasional skylight produce an atmosphere more cavelike than modern, perhaps in a direct attempt to remind visitors that they, too, are a part of human evolution. Via Yatzer Images via Gabriel Dvo?ák for Radko Kv?t Architecture

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Czech archaeological museum springs out of the ground like a modern-day cave system

Polands National Museum in Szczecin wins World Building of the Year 2016

November 21, 2016 by  
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Hidden underground so as not to obstruct views of the neighboring Philharmonic Hall (the 2015 winner of the Mies van der Rohe Prize ), the National Museum in Szczecin was built below an undulating public square, named Solidarnosc (Solidarity), a physical expression of the community’s response to the atrocities of the Second World War. The aboveground plaza that doubles as the museum roof is organized along an arced circulation path with a raised open amphitheater on one side and a softer, more rounded raised mound on the other. The raised surfaces hide entrances to the museum. The popular public space helps heal past wounds with play, dialogue, and community activities. The subterranean building was constructed from pre-cast concrete. Related: These are the world’s best buildings “This is a piece of topography as well as a museum,” said the WAF judging panel, led by architect David Chipperfield . “To go underground is to explore the memory and archaeology of the city, while above ground the public face of the building, including its undulating roof, and be interpreted and used in a variety of ways. This is a design which addresses the past in an optimistic, poetic and imaginative way.” The annual WAF awards are held to showcase the best architecture of the last 12 months. + World Architecture Festival + KWK Promes Via Dezeen Images via KWK Promes and WAF

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Polands National Museum in Szczecin wins World Building of the Year 2016

Poland unveils glowing bright blue bike lane that’s charged by the sun

October 5, 2016 by  
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Poland just unveiled an amazing new bike path that glows bright blue at night! The path near Lidzbark Warminski is illuminated by phosphor, a synthetic material that lights up after it’s charged by sunlight. Studio Roosegaarde’s Starry Night bike lane inspired TPA Instytut Bada? Technicznych Sp. z o.o to create the glowing bike path. TPA Sp. z o.o. president Igor Ruttmar told Gazeta Wyborcza that the material in the bike path can emit light for around 10 hours. Each day the path collects the energy that enables it to glow at night. Board of Regional Roads in Olsztyn director Waldemar Królikowski said the luminous bike path is meant to improve the safety of people biking at night. Related: Twinkling solar bike path inspired by Vincent van Gogh’s Starry Night pops up in the Netherlands According to Next Nature Network , the luminophores, or ” particles ” in the bike lane material can emit a variety of colors, and the designers picked blue to best fit in with the surrounding landscape. They also researched the sustainability of the materials they utilized, and how to make the materials as cost effective as possible since the bike lane does cost more than traditional lanes. While the Starry Night bike path provided inspiration, the technology utilized in the Polish bike lane is quite different from the Van Gogh-themed lane. Studio Roosegaarde’s bike lane drew on LEDs powered by a solar array and ” light-collecting paint .” TPA Sp. z o.o.’s bike lane doesn’t require any power sources. The bike lane is still being tested, as it is not known how long the lane will last before it begins to wear out. Via Next Nature Network and Gazeta Wyborcza Images via TPA Sp. z o.o.

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Poland unveils glowing bright blue bike lane that’s charged by the sun

Romania races to save some of the last untouched forests in Europe

September 14, 2016 by  
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Romania’s forests are in trouble – and the government has teamed up with Greenpeace and other environmental NGOs to save them. The initiative is racing to map forested areas in a national database to ensure federal protection status. Both legal and illegal logging have devastated the woodlands in the last decade, but it is not too late for the unspoiled wilderness that still remains. The national database that will track the expansive forests is predicted to go online within the next six months. Several of Romania’s beech forests may also qualify as UNESCO world heritage sites , further protecting the area and inviting reverent hiking enthusiasts, instead of loggers. Valentin Salageanu, the Greenpeace forest campaign coordinator for Central and Eastern Europe, estimated about half of the 250,000 hectares of woodlands has been destroyed since 2005. He told Reuters , “Many of them were destroyed in the last 10 years … partially as a result of both illegal and poorly executed legal logging.” Related: Despite protests, Poland commences logging in Europe’s last primeval woodland In addition to mapping the area, the country’s environment ministry has increased guard presence and enforced harsh fines for any illegal timber cutting, shipping, or trading. They have also encouraged residents to use the Forest Inspector mobile app, which allows users to track logging trucks and provides the government with invaluable on-the-ground intel. Via Reuters Images via Good Free Photos , Flickr

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Romania races to save some of the last untouched forests in Europe

Serpent-shaped hotel coils around site contours in the Beskid Mountains

June 28, 2016 by  
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“We started the project with an analysis of the building plot and its shape because we decided to fit our building into the way of the land as much as possible concurrently taking maximum advantage of its assets,” said Dariusz Dudek, the architecture firm’s founder. “Due to this fact, we were able to organically start creating a soft shape surrounding a raise on the plot and fitting the level grids perfectly.” He said the desire to achieve attractive views throughout the three-story hotel also shaped the hotel’s unique design, adding that the S shape also gave the building a sense of flow and openness – both visually and functionally. The various floors can function together as a “single organism,” according to the designer, or separately as needed. The lowest level is devoted to shared areas – the reception, restaurants, a hall and a recreation center. Guests rooms are alone on the first floor while a conference center and cafe occupy the top floor. Related: A modern mountain home inspired by the prospect of escape Material choice played an important role in the design. Borne out of a desire to create an organic form that is connected with the landscape and community, dd Architekci opted for a timber building to be sourced locally . “It’s the wood that influences the form, but most of all the way the mountain architecture is experienced,” Dudek said. “Its structure, warmth and construction properties paint a picture of authentic mountain buildings.” The materials contribute to the hotel’s peaceful aesthetic, which is possible despite its overall girth of 10,000 square meters, + dd Architekci

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Serpent-shaped hotel coils around site contours in the Beskid Mountains

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