France plans to make recycled plastic bottles less expensive

August 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on France plans to make recycled plastic bottles less expensive

Take that, plastic! France has announced that it plans to make bottles made with recycled plastic less expensive than those made from new plastic, part of a larger plan to intensify regulations on plastic use. Other aspects of the plan include increasing taxes on landfill and lowering the value-added tax on recycling activities. Related: Coca-Cola rewards recycling in the UK with half-priced theme park tickets According to Junior Environment Minister Brune Poirson, the French government will introduce further specific measures to address the problem of plastic pollution . “We need to transform the French economy,” she said. “We are launching a movement that will be scrutinized and followed by our European partners.” Part of this movement is a plan to reduce the price of products packaged in recycled containers by up to 10 percent. The discount-premium system encourages its consumers to recycle by making sustainability the more affordable option. “Tomorrow, when there is a choice between two bottles, one made with recycled plastic, the other not, the first one will be cheaper,” Poiron stated. Related: Dominica makes historic pledge to combat plastic pollution Currently, France has the second-worst recycling rate in Europe, with just 25.5 percent of its plastic packaging waste recycled. By comparison, Germany and the Netherlands recycle about 50 percent of their plastic waste. Nevertheless, the French government plans to change its plastic recycling rate to 100% by the year 2025, with the recent announcement marking the first steps toward this goal. Veolia and Suez, recycling powerhouses in the French market, have long been calling for the regulation changes, which would provide a boost for business. Retailers have also joined the cause; for example, French company E.Leclerc has pledged to eliminate the sale of throwaway plastics and replace them with more eco-friendly alternatives, such as bamboo , and is testing a loyalty point system for customers who deposit plastic and glass bottles in some store outlets. + Eurostat + Le Journal de Dimanche Via Reuters

Original post: 
France plans to make recycled plastic bottles less expensive

Court orders Monsanto to pay $289 million in cancer trial

August 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Court orders Monsanto to pay $289 million in cancer trial

Agrochemical company Monsanto has been ordered to pay $289 million to school groundskeeper Dewayne Johnson, who said the Bayer subsidiary’s chemical products gave him cancer. On Friday, a California jury ruled that the company acted with knowledge that risks of cancer were possible when allowing their weedkillers, such as Roundup , to remain on the market with no hazard warnings. The $289 million sum consists of $39 million in compensatory damages with the remaining $250 million accorded for punitive damages. The three-day trial in the Superior Court of California in San Francisco concluded with the determination that Monsanto did not warn consumers like Johnson of the dangers associated to glyphosate exposure. The 46-year-old’s case was filed in 2016, but it was rushed to trial as a result of the acuteness of his cancer. Doctors predicted that Johnson, a pest control manager for a California county school system, would not live past 2020 because of the non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma he developed while being on the job. Related: California man files lawsuit against Monsanto for allegedly hiding dangers of glyphosate Johnson regularly used popular Monsanto products Roundup and Ranger Pro, both herbicides containing glyphosate , a chemical that poses cancer risks to humans. Monsanto plans to appeal the verdict and cited 800 scientific studies and reviews in its support of the weedkillers. The company said, “Glyphosate does not cause cancer and did not cause Mr. Johnson’s cancer.” Monsanto was recently acquired for $62.5 billion by the German conglomerate Bayer, which is now faced with more than 5,000 lawsuits across the U.S. that resemble Mr. Johnson’s case. Related: Court orders EPA to ban pesticide that causes learning disabilities in children Jurors on the trial were privy to never-before-seen internal company documents “proving that Monsanto has known for decades that glyphosate, and specifically Roundup, could cause cancer,” Brent Wisner, Johnson’s lawyer, revealed in a statement. Wisner’s demand to the company was simple — “Put consumer safety first over profits.” Via The New York Times Image via Global Justice Now

Original post:
Court orders Monsanto to pay $289 million in cancer trial

Hefty EnergyBag Program: Keeping Plastics out of Landfills

August 3, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Hefty EnergyBag Program: Keeping Plastics out of Landfills

When China’s plastic ban went into effect in January of … The post Hefty EnergyBag Program: Keeping Plastics out of Landfills appeared first on Earth911.com.

More:
Hefty EnergyBag Program: Keeping Plastics out of Landfills

Infographic: Plastic Recycling Codes

June 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Infographic: Plastic Recycling Codes

If you’re puzzling over the recycling codes on your plastics, … The post Infographic: Plastic Recycling Codes appeared first on Earth911.com.

Read the original here:
Infographic: Plastic Recycling Codes

Earthling Survey: Would You Pay More for Sustainable Products?

June 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Earthling Survey: Would You Pay More for Sustainable Products?

Express your opinion and help drive environmental change. Every week, … The post Earthling Survey: Would You Pay More for Sustainable Products? appeared first on Earth911.com.

See more here:
Earthling Survey: Would You Pay More for Sustainable Products?

China’s Recycling Ban: What Do We Do with Our Plastics Now?

March 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on China’s Recycling Ban: What Do We Do with Our Plastics Now?

Thanks to curbside recycling programs, most Americans have developed an … The post China’s Recycling Ban: What Do We Do with Our Plastics Now? appeared first on Earth911.com.

See the original post:
China’s Recycling Ban: What Do We Do with Our Plastics Now?

86% of teens in study have traces of BPA in their bodies

February 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on 86% of teens in study have traces of BPA in their bodies

A vast majority of teenagers in a recent study had traces of Bisphenol A ( BPA ) inside of their bodies, according to the University of Exeter . They tested 94 17 to 19-year-olds and found BPA in 86 percent of them. The researchers are calling for better packaging labels to allow people to pick BPA-free products. The University of Exeter described BPA as an endocrine-disrupting industrial chemical , which has been in use since the 1960s to create some kinds of plastic . Prior research from the Exeter team discovered BPA can cause “changes to the expression of oestrogen-responsive genes, and the regulation of hormones.” And this recent study, published online earlier this month in BMJ Open , reveals a large number of the teens tested had measurable levels of BPA in their urine: an average of 1.9 nanograms per milliliter. Related: New study shows BPA-free plastics may not be safer The teens were tested before and after they took part in the trial – a week-long effort adhering to guidelines to try and cut BPA exposure in their diets. They worked to avoid BPA-containing plastic packaging, utilize glass or stainless steel containers for drinks and food, and microwave food in glass or ceramic containers. The study found overall, these efforts seemed to do little to help: most teens didn’t see a decrease in exposure. Only some of the teenagers with the highest BPA levels saw some reduction. The industrial chemical seems to be so ubiquitous even working to lower exposure doesn’t have a measurable impact overall, according to the university. University of Exeter associate professor of molecular genetics Lorna Harries said in a statement, “Our study shows that we currently do not have much of a choice about being exposed to BPA. We believe that much better labeling of products containing BPA is needed so people can make an informed choice.” + University of Exeter + BMJ Open Images via Depositphotos and Vinicius Amano on Unsplash

Original post:
86% of teens in study have traces of BPA in their bodies

How to Keep Plastics Out of the Ocean

October 12, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Eco Tech

Comments Off on How to Keep Plastics Out of the Ocean

You’re probably already aware that millions of tons of plastic … The post How to Keep Plastics Out of the Ocean appeared first on Earth911.com.

See the original post:
How to Keep Plastics Out of the Ocean

3 Myths About Recycling Plastic Bottles

January 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on 3 Myths About Recycling Plastic Bottles

Every year, Americans dispose of billions of plastic bottles each year. On the surface, plastic bottle recycling in the United States looks like an excellent way to reduce waste and prevent the extraction of virgin materials. Curbside recycling…

Read the rest here:
3 Myths About Recycling Plastic Bottles

New plastic recycling process uses no water and cuts costs in half

January 8, 2015 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on New plastic recycling process uses no water and cuts costs in half

A Mexico-based tech company says it can recycle more than 90 percent of any type of plastic without using water. The new method also reduces costs by half without suffering any loss in quality, representing what could be a revolutionary development for the recycling industry. This green technology can also be used to recycle materials that currently go into landfills, such as styrofoam and polystyrene—both of which take more than 500 years to biodegrade. Read the rest of New plastic recycling process uses no water and cuts costs in half Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cost reduction , energy conservation , mexico , plastic , plastics , polystyrene , recycling , recycling method , styrofoam , water conservation , water issues

View original post here:
New plastic recycling process uses no water and cuts costs in half

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1336 access attempts in the last 7 days.