Our Plastic Crisis Has Made NIMBYism Global

January 26, 2021 by  
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For decades, the U.S. has been exporting its plastic for … The post Our Plastic Crisis Has Made NIMBYism Global appeared first on Earth 911.

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Our Plastic Crisis Has Made NIMBYism Global

This plastic-free, organic personal care kit is ‘All Good’

December 25, 2020 by  
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When they say it’s All Good, this ethical body care company means it’s good for you and the planet. In addition to the company’s notable organic products previously highlighted in a variety of publications, All Good has now taken the extra step to remove all plastic from the products and shipping packaging in its newest two releases. All Good began in 2006 with the mission to do good. Since its inception, the company has become a member of 1% for the Planet, the J.E.D.I Collaborative and many other industry partnerships for environmental and social justice. Plus, All Good has earned the coveted B-Corp Certification. Related: How your beauty routine might be killing sharks All Good’s newest products Recently, All Good unveiled the Plastic Free Body Care Set, a set of organic body care products packaged with zero waste . It features All Good Goop Skin Relief Balm, reef-friendly SPF 50 Tinted Mineral Sunscreen Butter, nourishing Coconut Hand & Body Lotion and a hydrating Coconut Lip Balm. Each item is housed in glass, paper or metal containers and presented in an unbleached canvas travel pouch, making everything reusable, recyclable and biodegradable. While the switch to sustainable outer packaging is a direct response to requests from consumers, the company’s product ingredients are plant-based and organically grown, some harvested from All Good’s own farm. The brand’s commitment to staying away from harmful ingredients means no oxybenzone, gluten, phthalates or parabens. Ingredients grown on the company’s farm rely on regenerative agricultural practices in alignment with sustainable practices. Many products are made in a solar-powered community kitchen. A second product release, called the Get Glowing Lip and Cheek Tint collection, is equally botanically and organically formulated with a focus on ingredients like shea butter and avocado oil, as well as calendula harvested from the same organic farm near Morro Bay, California. The kit includes four colors of blush: rosy beige, coral golden pink, jam berry and shimmer to match any mood. They are packaged in recyclable glass jars. Each of these products is reef-friendly and provides broad spectrum SPF 15 protection. Is All Good really all good? All Good offered to send me a sample kit for review and promptly shipped the Plastic Free Body Care Set. I should start by saying I’m not much of a skincare aficionado and would go so far as to say that my lack of a skincare routine makes my skin health-conscious daughter cringe. However, I am dedicated to sun protection in the form of sunscreen and lip care, so I was excited to dig into my kit. The packaging the kit was sent in was minimalistic , plastic-free and recyclable as expected. The canvas bag is really cute in a very natural way. The statement is clear with the plain earthy colors, and the adorable little turtle is a nice touch and personal favorite of mine. I first grabbed for the Goop Skin Relief Balm. This was my favorite product for a very simple reason — I love the scent. Made with organic herbs and olive oil, I wouldn’t really call it scented. It just smells nourishing, and it is. Since I had just spent the weekend hauling wood for my home’s fireplaces, I had plenty of battle wounds to nurture. The compound is buttery without being greasy. It made my rough knuckles and scraped arms soft and a bit shimmery. Even though I liked the aroma, it was a bit strong for me. However, I’d put myself in the category of extremely scent-sensitive, so the power of the product’s scent might not be a problem for everyone. Next, I reached for the Coconut Body Lotion. I found the consistency luxurious. Although it’s made with cocoa butter and rosehip oil, it doesn’t leave an oily residue. My dry skin (remember aforementioned fireplaces) drank it in willingly, and the results were immediate. The hand and body lotion is high-quality. A little goes a long way, and a single application left my hands feeling soft and looking supple for hours — even with all the handwashing. Unfortunately the coconut smell was a little strong for me, although I imagine most people would find it to be subtle. If you like coconut, you would probably describe it as pleasant. My daughter immediately rehomed it as a favor to my senses, or so she says. I moved on to the reef-friendly, SPF 50 Tinted Mineral Sunscreen Butter. While the lotion and Goop came in glass jars, the sunscreen is housed in a tin. It’s recently been 36°F and cloudy, so I wasn’t able to test it at the beach; All Good reports it is water-resistant for up to 80 minutes. The tint looks dark but was subtle when applied to my off-season pale skin. It is a butter, so it has a slightly heavy feel. Although I would say it felt a bit greasy, I can see how that is beneficial for the sunscreen protection requirements. Lastly was the Hydrating Coconut Lip Balm. Admittedly, I am obsessed with lip-moisturizing products. What I lack in skincare products, I make up for in readily-available lip balms in every corner of my home and car. This lip balm lives up to the name. It’s hydrating, nourishing and unequivocally coconut. I loved the texture and moisturizing aspects, but, again, the scent was too much for me. My teenage son quickly adopted it and reports he loves the way it smells and feels on his lips. The packaging is unique to any roll-up lip balm I’ve used, and I deeply appreciate the design away from plastic. In addition to the products, the kit came with a nice message from the company, printed on a seed paper you can plant and watch grow into wildflowers. I thought this was a lovely touch and dynamic way to show the All Good commitment to a sustainable business model. + All Good Images via All Good and Dawn Hammon / Inhabitat Editor’s Note: This product review is not sponsored by All Good. All opinions on the products and company are the author’s own.

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This plastic-free, organic personal care kit is ‘All Good’

Infographic: Plastic Pandemic in the Age of COVID-19

December 11, 2020 by  
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Recycling efforts have taken a backseat during the pandemic. Efforts … The post Infographic: Plastic Pandemic in the Age of COVID-19 appeared first on Earth 911.

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How You Can Help Protect Our Oceans

November 4, 2020 by  
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A healthy ocean means healthy humans.We depend on the ocean … The post How You Can Help Protect Our Oceans appeared first on Earth 911.

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Maven Moment: Reuse Ideas for Old Pantyhose & Stockings

November 4, 2020 by  
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Years ago, pantyhose or stockings were must-haves for a working … The post Maven Moment: Reuse Ideas for Old Pantyhose & Stockings appeared first on Earth 911.

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Maven Moment: Reuse Ideas for Old Pantyhose & Stockings

Companies in Japan launch edible single-use bags to save Nara deer

October 23, 2020 by  
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Local companies in Nara, Japan have developed single-use bags made from milk cartons and rice bran that are safe if ingested by the city’s iconic deer. In 2019, multiple deer accidentally swallowed trash , namely plastic bags, that were littered by tourists. Several of the deer died, including one that had consumed nearly 9 pounds of waste. This prompted concerned entities to create a safer alternative to plastic packaging that can be digested without harm to the deer. The newly developed bags have been instrumental in saving the lives of the hundreds of deer that roam Nara. The bags are safe for deer, because the milk cartons and rice bran used to make these bags contain easy-to-digest ingredients. While there has been a decline in tourists and their plastic waste during the pandemic, the single-use bags still stand as a positive change to continue into the future. Related: Climate change is killing reindeer in the Arctic Tourists in Nara can purchase treats to feed the deer, and signs are posted warning visitors to only feed the deer approved treats that do not come in plastic packaging. Still, many tourists left behind waste that was consumed by the animals . After hearing of the deer that died from ingesting plastic , Hidetoshi Matsukawa, a local businessman, reached out to other firms with the interest of creating bags and packaging that would be safe in the event that they were eaten by the deer. “We made the paper with the deer in mind,” Matsukawa said. “ Tourism in Nara is supported by deer so we will protect them and promote the bags as a brand for the local economy.” The efforts to market the bags as a safe option for visitors to the city have been fruitful. About 35,000 bags have already been sold to local businesses and Nara’s tourism bureau. Since 1957, Japan has deemed the deer in Nara as national treasures that are protected by law, as they are considered divine messengers in the area. Via The Guardian Image via Matazel

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Heated plastic baby bottles release millions of microplastics in formula

October 21, 2020 by  
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A new study published in the journal Nature Food has revealed that babies around the world are consuming over 1.5 million microplastics each day. According to the study, microplastics are released in large quantities in baby plastic bottles, especially when the bottles are heated. But heating formula in the bottle is standard practice in preparing formula, and a majority of bottles on the market are plastic. While the study has proven beyond doubt that plastic bottles are releasing microplastics, the researchers said that there is no need for alarm yet. According to Philipp Schwabl, a researcher at the Medical University of Vienna who has also researched microplastics, parents should not be worried until more information is available. According to a report released by the World Health Organization last year, there is not sufficient evidence to show that microplastics are harmful to humans . Related: New study finds microplastics in fruits and vegetables “At the moment, there is no need to be afraid,” Schwabl said. “But it is an open question and definitely an unmet [research] need.” The study authors found that about 82% of all baby bottles sold globally are made out of polypropylene. Researchers reviewed 10 types of plastic baby bottles. When they were used to prepare infant formula, it was revealed that all 10 bottles released microplastics and nanoplastics. The infant formula was prepared according to the World Health Organization guidelines, which state that powdered formula should be mixed with water heated to about 158°F. The researchers concluded that the release of microplastics is heat-sensitive. “What’s happening is that there’s an interaction between the [plastic] polymer and the water. It’s almost like flaking of the surface of the actual plastic itself,” said John Boland, a professor of chemistry and materials science researcher at Trinity College Dublin in Ireland and one of the authors of the study. At the temperature of 158°F, most bottles released between 1 million and 16 million microplastics per liter. Further, the bottles also released millions of nanoplastics. The researchers said that more research needs to be done and more data collected to determine the exact effect of these plastic particles on babies and adults. + Nature Food Via NPR Image via Tung256

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PPE Use Protects Us Against Coronavirus, but It’s Harming the Oceans

October 8, 2020 by  
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Did you know that 91% of the plastic produced has … The post PPE Use Protects Us Against Coronavirus, but It’s Harming the Oceans appeared first on Earth 911.

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PPE Use Protects Us Against Coronavirus, but It’s Harming the Oceans

We Earthlings: Get the Plastic Out!

September 29, 2020 by  
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The average American discards 17.7 pounds of PET (also known … The post We Earthlings: Get the Plastic Out! appeared first on Earth 911.

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LEGO responds to kids’ worries about single-use plastics

September 18, 2020 by  
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Kids have spoken, and LEGO has listened. “We have received many letters from  children about the environment asking us to remove single-use plastic packaging,” Niels B. Christiansen, LEGO Group CEO, said in a statement. “We have been exploring alternatives for some time and the passion and ideas from children inspired us to begin to make the change.” The Danish toymaker announced Tuesday that it will replace the plastic bags inside boxed LEGO sets with recyclable paper bags. Over the next five years, the company expects to completely phase out the plastic bags. Related: A guide to the best eco-friendly holiday gifts for children Of course, the bag issue is ironic considering LEGO turns about 90,000 metric tons of plastic per year into its iconic bricks. Though the company has tried finding alternative materials, so far nothing else is as durable. Currently, 2% of LEGO pieces — including LEGO trees and bushes — are made from  sugar  cane. The company is working to increase and improve plant-based “bio bricks” and to make all products from sustainable materials by 2030. For now, LEGO stresses that kids can use the plastic bricks forever — no need to put them in the world’s landfills. The bricks manufactured today fit those made 40 years ago. If you don’t have anybody to pass your collection on to, the LEGO Replay program helps customers donate used bricks to LEGO-deprived kids in the U.S. and  Canada . The company plans to expand Replay to other countries. LEGO also added  solar panels  to its factories as part of its goal of a carbon-neutral manufacturing process by 2022. The company has also improved waste handling and reduced water consumption. “We cannot lose sight of the fundamental challenges facing future generations,” said Christiansen. “It’s critical we take urgent action now to care for the planet and future generations. As a company who looks to children as our role models, we are inspired by the millions of kids who have called for more urgent action on  climate change . We believe they should have access to opportunities to develop the skills necessary to create a sustainable future. We will step up our efforts to use our resources, networks, expertise and platforms to make a positive difference.” + LEGO Via CNN Images via LEGO

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