How You Can Help Protect Our Oceans

November 4, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on How You Can Help Protect Our Oceans

A healthy ocean means healthy humans.We depend on the ocean … The post How You Can Help Protect Our Oceans appeared first on Earth 911.

More:
How You Can Help Protect Our Oceans

Maven Moment: Reuse Ideas for Old Pantyhose & Stockings

November 4, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Maven Moment: Reuse Ideas for Old Pantyhose & Stockings

Years ago, pantyhose or stockings were must-haves for a working … The post Maven Moment: Reuse Ideas for Old Pantyhose & Stockings appeared first on Earth 911.

Original post:
Maven Moment: Reuse Ideas for Old Pantyhose & Stockings

Companies in Japan launch edible single-use bags to save Nara deer

October 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Companies in Japan launch edible single-use bags to save Nara deer

Local companies in Nara, Japan have developed single-use bags made from milk cartons and rice bran that are safe if ingested by the city’s iconic deer. In 2019, multiple deer accidentally swallowed trash , namely plastic bags, that were littered by tourists. Several of the deer died, including one that had consumed nearly 9 pounds of waste. This prompted concerned entities to create a safer alternative to plastic packaging that can be digested without harm to the deer. The newly developed bags have been instrumental in saving the lives of the hundreds of deer that roam Nara. The bags are safe for deer, because the milk cartons and rice bran used to make these bags contain easy-to-digest ingredients. While there has been a decline in tourists and their plastic waste during the pandemic, the single-use bags still stand as a positive change to continue into the future. Related: Climate change is killing reindeer in the Arctic Tourists in Nara can purchase treats to feed the deer, and signs are posted warning visitors to only feed the deer approved treats that do not come in plastic packaging. Still, many tourists left behind waste that was consumed by the animals . After hearing of the deer that died from ingesting plastic , Hidetoshi Matsukawa, a local businessman, reached out to other firms with the interest of creating bags and packaging that would be safe in the event that they were eaten by the deer. “We made the paper with the deer in mind,” Matsukawa said. “ Tourism in Nara is supported by deer so we will protect them and promote the bags as a brand for the local economy.” The efforts to market the bags as a safe option for visitors to the city have been fruitful. About 35,000 bags have already been sold to local businesses and Nara’s tourism bureau. Since 1957, Japan has deemed the deer in Nara as national treasures that are protected by law, as they are considered divine messengers in the area. Via The Guardian Image via Matazel

Read the original:
Companies in Japan launch edible single-use bags to save Nara deer

Heated plastic baby bottles release millions of microplastics in formula

October 21, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Heated plastic baby bottles release millions of microplastics in formula

A new study published in the journal Nature Food has revealed that babies around the world are consuming over 1.5 million microplastics each day. According to the study, microplastics are released in large quantities in baby plastic bottles, especially when the bottles are heated. But heating formula in the bottle is standard practice in preparing formula, and a majority of bottles on the market are plastic. While the study has proven beyond doubt that plastic bottles are releasing microplastics, the researchers said that there is no need for alarm yet. According to Philipp Schwabl, a researcher at the Medical University of Vienna who has also researched microplastics, parents should not be worried until more information is available. According to a report released by the World Health Organization last year, there is not sufficient evidence to show that microplastics are harmful to humans . Related: New study finds microplastics in fruits and vegetables “At the moment, there is no need to be afraid,” Schwabl said. “But it is an open question and definitely an unmet [research] need.” The study authors found that about 82% of all baby bottles sold globally are made out of polypropylene. Researchers reviewed 10 types of plastic baby bottles. When they were used to prepare infant formula, it was revealed that all 10 bottles released microplastics and nanoplastics. The infant formula was prepared according to the World Health Organization guidelines, which state that powdered formula should be mixed with water heated to about 158°F. The researchers concluded that the release of microplastics is heat-sensitive. “What’s happening is that there’s an interaction between the [plastic] polymer and the water. It’s almost like flaking of the surface of the actual plastic itself,” said John Boland, a professor of chemistry and materials science researcher at Trinity College Dublin in Ireland and one of the authors of the study. At the temperature of 158°F, most bottles released between 1 million and 16 million microplastics per liter. Further, the bottles also released millions of nanoplastics. The researchers said that more research needs to be done and more data collected to determine the exact effect of these plastic particles on babies and adults. + Nature Food Via NPR Image via Tung256

View original post here: 
Heated plastic baby bottles release millions of microplastics in formula

PPE Use Protects Us Against Coronavirus, but It’s Harming the Oceans

October 8, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on PPE Use Protects Us Against Coronavirus, but It’s Harming the Oceans

Did you know that 91% of the plastic produced has … The post PPE Use Protects Us Against Coronavirus, but It’s Harming the Oceans appeared first on Earth 911.

See the original post:
PPE Use Protects Us Against Coronavirus, but It’s Harming the Oceans

We Earthlings: Get the Plastic Out!

September 29, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on We Earthlings: Get the Plastic Out!

The average American discards 17.7 pounds of PET (also known … The post We Earthlings: Get the Plastic Out! appeared first on Earth 911.

Original post:
We Earthlings: Get the Plastic Out!

LEGO responds to kids’ worries about single-use plastics

September 18, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on LEGO responds to kids’ worries about single-use plastics

Kids have spoken, and LEGO has listened. “We have received many letters from  children about the environment asking us to remove single-use plastic packaging,” Niels B. Christiansen, LEGO Group CEO, said in a statement. “We have been exploring alternatives for some time and the passion and ideas from children inspired us to begin to make the change.” The Danish toymaker announced Tuesday that it will replace the plastic bags inside boxed LEGO sets with recyclable paper bags. Over the next five years, the company expects to completely phase out the plastic bags. Related: A guide to the best eco-friendly holiday gifts for children Of course, the bag issue is ironic considering LEGO turns about 90,000 metric tons of plastic per year into its iconic bricks. Though the company has tried finding alternative materials, so far nothing else is as durable. Currently, 2% of LEGO pieces — including LEGO trees and bushes — are made from  sugar  cane. The company is working to increase and improve plant-based “bio bricks” and to make all products from sustainable materials by 2030. For now, LEGO stresses that kids can use the plastic bricks forever — no need to put them in the world’s landfills. The bricks manufactured today fit those made 40 years ago. If you don’t have anybody to pass your collection on to, the LEGO Replay program helps customers donate used bricks to LEGO-deprived kids in the U.S. and  Canada . The company plans to expand Replay to other countries. LEGO also added  solar panels  to its factories as part of its goal of a carbon-neutral manufacturing process by 2022. The company has also improved waste handling and reduced water consumption. “We cannot lose sight of the fundamental challenges facing future generations,” said Christiansen. “It’s critical we take urgent action now to care for the planet and future generations. As a company who looks to children as our role models, we are inspired by the millions of kids who have called for more urgent action on  climate change . We believe they should have access to opportunities to develop the skills necessary to create a sustainable future. We will step up our efforts to use our resources, networks, expertise and platforms to make a positive difference.” + LEGO Via CNN Images via LEGO

Read the rest here: 
LEGO responds to kids’ worries about single-use plastics

Why Plastic Waste is a C Suite Issue

September 9, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Why Plastic Waste is a C Suite Issue

Why Plastic Waste is a C Suite Issue Why is plastic waste a c-suite issue, and how can corporate leaders have a positive impact on plastic waste reduction, while potentially benefiting their businesses? Plastic waste reduction is not only an environmental issue. It is an economic one. Indeed, every C-suite officer has a reason to care about plastic waste reduction, and can benefit by trying to address the problem. Even companies who are not a traditional part of the plastic value chain can play an important role. Last year, Morgan Stanley made a firm-wide commitment, the Morgan Stanley Plastic Waste Resolution, to facilitate the prevention, reduction, and removal of 50 million metric tons of plastic waste from rivers, oceans, landfills, and landscapes by 2030. Across other industries, and all around the C-suite table, business leaders can play an important part in building a more sustainable plastics economy that can deliver benefits for sustainability, for brand and for profits. Speaker Audrey Choi, Chief Marketing Officer, Morgan Stanley Holly Secon Tue, 09/08/2020 – 22:22 Featured Off

See the rest here:
Why Plastic Waste is a C Suite Issue

SeaChange uses plasma arc technology to save the oceans from plastic waste

September 8, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on SeaChange uses plasma arc technology to save the oceans from plastic waste

We’ve all heard of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and the continuing flow of oceanbound plastic. But what if something could intercept that plastic before it made it into the oceans? That’s the plan of SeaChange, a new organization that claims to have devised the technology to save our oceans from the plastic pollution crisis. The start of SeaChange SeaChange founders Carl Borgquist and Tim Nett grew up together in Paradise, California, and have been lifelong friends. They went on to have varied careers — Borgquist in renewable energy and as CEO of Absaroka Energy and Nett as a serial entrepreneur in advertising and media. But then their entire hometown burned in the infamous Camp Fire of 2018. Eighty-five people lost their lives and more than 11,000 homes burned to the ground. It was the worst fire in California history up to that point, and the future looked bleak as climate change worsened wildfires throughout the west. Related: Babylegs — the inexpensive, educational way to monitor ocean plastic   “ Climate change stops being theoretical when it destroys everything you’ve grown up with,” Nett said . “When there is no hometown to go back to. We couldn’t in clear conscience stand by and do nothing.” The two men decided to put their considerable life experience and gray matter together to work on climate change. And they’ve made a promising breakthrough. How SeaChange’s technology works SeaChange will outfit its ships with something called the Plasma Enhanced Melter (PEM). The PEM uses plasma arc technology to zap plastic and other trash before it enters the ocean. Plastic is shredded before it enters the Plasma Arc Zone. Instead of leaving harmful residues like conventional waste treatment methods, plasma arc technology uses high temperature and high electrical energy to heat waste , mostly by radiation. Organic material can be burned down into a combustible gas called syngas, which can be used as clean fuel for SeaChange’s ships. Inorganic components wind up as glassy slag. This reusable black glass is said to be nontoxic and safe for marine life. SeaChange will heat the plasma arc to temperatures up to 18,000 degrees. “That’s like dropping it on the surface of the Sun,” SeaChange said on its website. While this may sound like science fiction, the technology has been used on hazardous and medical waste since 1996. Finding the trash Of the 400 million tons of plastic produced every year, 90% is burned, buried or lost in the environment. Only 10% is recycled . Even if plastic is recycled, you could say that’s delaying the problem. Up until now, plastic has been forever-lasting, with no permanent solution to vaporize it. The SeaChange ships will seek the plastic that is lost in the environment. According to the organization’s research, about 10 million tons of plastic trash enters the oceans each year. That equals about one dump truck load per minute. Of this ocean plastic pollution, 90% flows into the sea from the 10 most polluted rivers . China’s Yangtze River gets the trophy for pollution champion, collecting 1.5 million tons of plastic trash before dumping it into the East China Sea near Shanghai. The runner-up is the Indus, which originates in Tibet before winding through Pakistan and then emptying an average 164,332 tons of plastic junk into the Arabian Sea by Karachi. The other eight rivers are the Yellow, Hai, Nile, Ganges, Pearl, Amur, Niger and Mekong Rivers. Eventually, the SeaChange ships — equipped with plasma arc technology — will travel to these polluted rivers to harvest and vaporize plastic trash before it enters the ocean. The crew can process up to 5 tons of plastic on the ship each day, melting it down to about 225 pounds of inert black glass . First stop, Indonesia SeaChange is planning to go on its first mission in 2021. Destination: Indonesia. Currently, somewhere between 0.5 and 1.4 million tons of plastic waste wind up in the ocean around Indonesia every year. SeaChange plans to remove trash to protect a sensitive Indonesian ecosystem full of coral species and mangrove forests. The organization is still sorting out what NGOs, government agencies and individuals it can partner with to make the mission happen. Since planning began, the pandemic has created additional logistical obstacles. It’s also contributing to the plastic problem. A huge surge of medical waste is landing in Indonesian waters after a six-month uptick in single-use gloves and masks. The trash that stays out of the waterways is being burned in open pits, exposing people to carcinogenic clouds of dioxins, which isn’t much better. If all goes to plan, SeaChange will start making a dent in the oceanbound plastic problem next year. This partnership between Borgquist and Nett reminds us of the oft-repeated and inspiring idea that even something terrible can bring about something positive. For example, when your hometown burns, you decide to tackle one of the world’s biggest problems. If the Indonesia mission is successful next year, maybe we’ll one day see a SeaChange ship at the mouth of every polluted river. + SeaChange Images via Kevin Krejci , M.W. and Sergei Tokmakov, Esq.

The rest is here:
SeaChange uses plasma arc technology to save the oceans from plastic waste

rePurpose

August 9, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on rePurpose

rePurpose saracefalu2 Sun, 08/09/2020 – 14:59 rePurpose Global is a movement of conscious consumers & businesses going Plastic Neutral by financing the removal of ocean-bound plastic worldwide. We are here to reinvent the wheel of the world’s resource economy – one where our duty to protect the planet is ethically shared among manufacturers, consumers, and recycler Sponsor Website https://repurpose.global/

More:
rePurpose

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 2869 access attempts in the last 7 days.