Los Angeles art show features historic Barnsdall olive wood

November 16, 2021 by  
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The Barnsdall Art Park in East Hollywood, California has spent its pandemic years getting a makeover. The park is known for its art center and the site of Hollyhock House, designed by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright. But central to this urban oasis is a historic 463-tree olive grove. And now an innovative olive-wood themed art exhibit and online auction is raising money to plant an additional forty trees. The Barnsdall Olive Wood Workshop Exhibition and Online Auction opened November 13 for in-person viewing at the contemporary art gallery Luis De Jesus Los Angeles . Twenty-one well known local LA artists, architects, designers and landscape artists have their work in the show. All the pieces feature Barnsdall olive wood from a recent pruning. The online auction closes December 4. Related: LA’s Barnsdall Art Park revives historic olive grove The show’s mission is to improve the air quality of East Hollywood — piggybacking on L.A.’s Green New Deal, a sweeping initiative that includes planting 90,000 new trees — and to further beautify the grounds. Canadian immigrant and real estate broker Joseph H. Spires originally planted a commercial olive grove here in the 1890s. In 1919, he sold the property to oil heiress, philanthropist and art lover Aline Barnsdall. She hired Frank Lloyd Wright to build Hollyhock House, which became L.A.’s first UNESCO World Heritage Site. Inhabitat talked to two artists participating in the Barnsdall Olive Wood Workshop Exhibition and Online Auction: Sevag Pakradouni of Sev’s Wood Crafts and Kasey Toomey of landscape architecture design firm TERREMOTO . Here’s what they had to say about turning wood from historic trees into new works of art. Inhabitat:  How did you get involved with the Barnsdall Olive Wood show? Sev:  My daughter Katherine was the horticulturist and project manager for the recent Olive Grove Initiative which was created in partnership with the Barnsdall Art Park Foundation, the Department of Recreation and Parks and the Los Angeles Parks Foundation. One of the aspects of this initiative involved a horticultural survey of the grove’s existing olive trees and the careful pruning of 400 trees. When I heard that they were going to be pruning the olive trees, I immediately recommended that the wood be saved and utilized, rather than chipped or discarded.  Olivewood is a valuable wood, and one of my philosophies as a wood worker is to salvage and create functional art out of wood that might otherwise go to waste . We worked with the contractors who pruned the trees so that all pieces of wood two inches in diameter or greater were saved and safely stored to be made into future art that would benefit the Barnsdall Art Park Foundation’s goal to restore the grove . Even though some of the wood was still “green” and not yet workable, there were enough dried pieces to initiate this art project mere months after the grove was pruned. After the remainder of the wood cures, we will have even more to work with in years to come. Inhabitat: Tell us about the pieces you made for the show. Sev:  In my woodworking, I like to combine form with function, art with utility. When I thought of the era when this grove of olive trees became the foundation for the landscape of the Hollyhock House, I wanted my piece to harken back to that period of time in history, so I decided to use my piece of olivewood to make bases for lamps utilizing (now modern LED versions) Edison light bulbs. I let each piece of wood guide my hand to create what it would eventually become, so each lamp base has a different shape and feel from the other. Since Sev’s Wood Crafts is a family affair, my daughter utilized her selected piece of olivewood to create a pyrographic drawing entitled Sentinel . She cut and arranged the wood to form her canvas and then burned her designs into the wood freehand.  She never knows what her designs will be in advance, but allows the wood and her instincts to guide the process.  Olivewood is easy to burn and provides a good contrast, as it is light in color and relatively uniformly textured. Toomey: We selected the most gnarly piece of olive wood we could find, and our creative process started from there. We riffed on the hollyhock/spine motif found throughout the Hollyhock House, specifically the Hollyhock House chairs. We repositioned the olive wood branch as the spine for our stool seat as a direct reference to the olive grove. Also, we utilized wood offcuts from the detritus of our creative practice, highlighted by the red painted board end of the fir that was slapped on at the milling yard. As environmentally-conscious designers and artists, we work hard to use everything with love and care and often are most inspired by what’s left behind. We aim to create environments and objects that are aesthetically, ecologically and metaphysically provocative and productive. Inhabitat:  Have you worked with olive wood before? How is it different from other woods? Sev:  I’ve worked with olivewood before and have always liked its character in finished products. I’ve made vases, bottle stoppers, pens, belaying pins, hair forks and other items, and it never ceases to amaze me. It takes a natural high luster and is highly prized for its dense, intricate grain pattern when the wood is particularly old.  Fun fact: our cats seem to react to the smell of the wood as they do to catnip. If I have shavings on my shoes or olivewood in the house, it isn’t long before they’ve taken notice.  It’s not always easy to find large pieces of olivewood, so I often try to use whatever I can find from trimmings and cast-offs that are considered “leftovers” from other wood workers or carpenters. I can’t abide waste, so I will work with pieces small enough to make a simple hair stick or wooden pendant that my daughter burns with a design in order to maximize its use. Our backyard is a testament to my inability to see wood go to waste, as we have piles of wood we’ve salvaged from the neighborhood, whether it’s a 60-year-old apricot tree the neighbor just cut down, or chunks of miscellaneous wood I’ve intercepted on its way to the chipper. Toomey:  We hadn’t worked with olive wood as a material before, but we have planted many olive trees in our landscape practice. We chose to not manipulate or mill the olive branch into wood. Instead, to honor its natural form, we kept it as is.  Inhabitat:  How do you feel about the Barnsdall olive trees? Sev:  The most exciting olive trees in the grove are the oldest trees. There are 46 of the 463 trees in the grove which are 130 years old and original to the grove prior to the Hollyhock House being built. The wood that comes from the gnarled branches or stumps of one of those older trees has some of the most unique and beautiful character inside. To see a stump remaining from one of those older trees and to know that its demise years ago was treated like the demise of any other dead city tree — meaning it was chipped into mulch and processed as green waste — causes me physical pain to think about.   Toomey:  While they are a remnant of a more agrarian past, nonetheless they remain and persist — offering habitat , shade and food for birds, insects and humans. The integration of the existing olive grove into the Barnsdall landscape design by Frank Lloyd Wright is analogous to our entire design ethos where landscapes are curated amalgamations of place — the past, present and future. Images via Sevag Pakradouni and Kasey Toomey

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Los Angeles art show features historic Barnsdall olive wood

Cariuma teams up with Mike Vallely for 100% vegan shoes

November 16, 2021 by  
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In a partnership between lovers of nature, shoe brand Cariuma has coordinated with Mike Vallely, a legend in the skateboarding world, to develop a 100% vegan shoe that pairs well with a skateboard, a night on the town and at a PETA gathering. Cariuma isn’t new to sustainable materials, but is excited to expand their offerings to include the Mike Vallely x Cariuma sneaker. It represents the first product rolled out with the newest addition vegan suede. According to the company, the high-performance material is, “Tough like [Vallely]. This innovative material is 2.7X more resistant than animal suede, and was formulated and developed to create stellar performance and durability.” Related: Sylven New York has vegan shoes made from apples In an industry plagued with headlines around dirty manufacturing and long-term post-consumer waste , the Mike Vallely x Cariuma sneaker offers an earth and animal friendly option.  Although it clearly has feet on the ground in its concern for the environment , Cariuma didn’t stop at dabbling in environmentally-friendly materials here and there. In fact, they’ve recently achieved B-Corp certification, a process that ensures a dedication to the planet at every step of material selection, production and sales. The company reports being the first skate shoe company to earn B-Corp certification. Tuning into the stylish trends Vallely has influenced throughout his career, the contrasting materials and details on the skate shoe mirrors his not-so-subtle style on the board and in front of the mic as lead vocalist for the band Black Flag.  “The must-have for this shoe was for it to be free of animal-based materials yet still be tough and long-lasting,” said Vallely. “We’ve sourced some excellent materials for this shoe, namely vegan suede and recycled nylon that make the shoe strong, light and give it a reduced carbon footprint.” Durability was an important aspect of the design in an effort to ensure a long and useful life, even standing up to the elements on the street. But the team was able to maintain the longevity quotient in conjunction with a recycled mesh lining and rec y cled webbing, featuring a natural rubber -reinforced outsole.  The shoe also features a plant-based insole made with Mamona oil. The laces, threads and labels are all made from recycled materials. These combined efforts are leading the shoe for Oeko-Tex standard 100 certification. + Cariuma Images via Cariuma

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Cariuma teams up with Mike Vallely for 100% vegan shoes

How many trees are needed to offset a city’s carbon emissions?

August 26, 2021 by  
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Trees are nature’s lungs. While we enjoy their beauty, shade and fruits of their existence, they are silently working to clean the air. The natural process of all plants taking in carbon and releasing oxygen not only gives us clean air to breathe but also stores carbon that otherwise contributes to global warming . Countries around the world are in a race to find solutions for these types of greenhouse gases, which are a result of human activities like driving cars and manufacturing goods. While the push for electric vehicles and renewable energy through  solar panels , wind power and hydroelectricity takes the spotlight, another part of the solution equation is growing all around us in the form of trees. Related: Three Americans’ lifetime emissions enough to kill one person The simple fact is, planting trees is an exceptional tool in the fight against climate change. With this in mind,  Compare The Market  has presented its most recent research on the number of trees capital cities around the world would need to plant annually to offset the carbon emissions they contribute to the atmosphere. The study is based on information available through the Global Carbon Atlas Global City Emissions dataset, which measures emissions levels. While major cities work to reverse, slow down and stop the creation of these carbon emissions, what is the estimated number of trees it would take to counterbalance them? Which countries are the highest contributors and which have the lowest  environmental  impact? According to the data, Asia has some work to do. Five of the ten top carbon-emitting capital cities are in Asia. Note that for comparative purposes, the dataset measures transport, industrial,  waste  and local power plants emissions within city boundaries. The report combined data to show the total amount of carbon produced alongside the number of trees it would take to offset it. For example, the five cities in Asia, which include Beijing, Singapore, Hong Kong, Tokyo and Seoul, release a combined 219,506,539 tCO2 annually. The cities would have to plant 43,901,308 trees each year to offset those emissions. Individually, Beijing would need to plant 15,020,976 trees, followed by Singapore with 9,366,336 and Hong Kong with 8,975,292. Tokyo needs a 5,522,200-plant offset and Seoul 5,016,504. Other cities in the top 10 were Istanbul, Lagos, Santiago, London and Mexico City.  An energy spokesperson at Compare The Market comments, “Becoming carbon neutral is an essential goal for countries around the world, and as pledges roll in to reach this target by 2050 and beyond, immediate action is needed. One way we have studied is to offset emissions by planting trees which is great for absorbing CO2, with added benefits of supporting the ecosystem and  wildlife .” The tree offset calculation is based on information sourced from Carbonify.com’s carbon dioxide emissions calculator. The estimates are based on the assumption that five  trees  planted can clean up each ton of carbon dioxide produced.  The study stated, “A tree planted in the humid tropics absorbs on average 50 pounds (22 kg) of carbon dioxide annually over 40 years – each tree will absorb 1 ton of CO2 over its lifetime; but as trees grow, they compete for resources and some may die or be destroyed – not all will achieve their full carbon sequestration potential.” On the other end of the data spectrum are the countries performing better in the battle of low carbon emissions. For these results, a few substitutions were made in the face of missing data. Toronto, Milan and Basel were substituted to include Canada, Italy and Switzerland in the study. Reykjavik, Iceland was the least carbon-emitting capital in the study with total emissions of 346,630 tCO2 per year. The city would still have some work to do, planting 69,326 trees annually to offset its footprint. Of all the cities in the study, Reykjavik was the only one to come in below the 500,000 tCO2-produced mark. Even though nearly 70,000 is still a lot of trees, it was also the only city to have an estimate below 100,000 trees per year to offset carbon emissions. New Zealand took second place for carbon control with annual emissions of 621,179 tCO2. For Wellington to neutralize this, it will have to plant 124,236 trees a year. Basel, Switzerland, had the third-lowest number to plant at 156,786 trees to offset its 783,932 tCO2 footprint. Every other city in the study came in at over 200,000 trees a year. The study provides one tool in an array of options to reduce carbon release. Planting trees alone isn’t a sustainable solution, but neither is focusing solely on renewable energy or  recycling . To achieve goals set by world leaders, it will take a combination of actions across a range of environmental fields.  “The number of trees required may seem very high in cities like Beijing which would need to plant over 15 million trees, but this is if we only used plant power alone. There are many other initiatives and technologies in place, like the government incentives, which present lots of opportunities to offset carbon emissions on a small and large scale,” the spokesman said. + Compare The Market Images via Pixabay

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How many trees are needed to offset a city’s carbon emissions?

‘Trump Forest’ plants trees to offset president’s climate ignorance

August 15, 2017 by  
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President Donald Trump is notorious for his ignorance on climate change . So instead of sitting by while his administration harms the planet, a British climate scientist, American PhD candidate, and French and Kiwi sustainable hat company founder decided to take action. They started Trump Forest to encourage people to plant trees , and have seen a huge response: so far hundreds of people around the world have pledged 130,999 trees . “Where ignorance grows trees” is the tagline of the Trump Forest project. Dan Price, Jeff Willis, and Adrien Taylor initiated the project in March of this year in New Zealand with a contribution of 1,000 native trees from Taylor’s company Offcut (which plants a tree for every cap sold). From there, hundreds of people in places as far-flung as Malawi, Japan, and the United States pledged to plant trees too. Related: Meet the teen planting 150 trees for every person on Earth Trump Forest isn’t after money, according to their website. Instead, they hope people will pay for and plant trees where they live in the name of America’s president, or donate to charity Eden Reforestation Projects . Taylor told the BBC of Trump, “Only a small percentage of the world voted him in, but we all have to deal with the consequences of his climate ignorance.” The organizers told the BBC they would need to plant a forest as big as Kentucky to offset Trump’s policies. They also estimated they’d need to offset 650 megatonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent by 2025 to make up for the actions of America’s commander-in-chief – that’s over 100 billion new trees. They think it’s feasible. Wouldn’t a forest named after Trump just bolster his already large ego? The organizers say people have complained about that, but they’d prefer if the president got on board. Taylor told the BBC, “We kind of want him to love the forest; this is his forest after all. We would love it if he tweeted about it.” Price said, “All we’re trying to do is pick up the slack he created and do the work for him.” If you want to get involved, you can check out the project here . + Trump Forest Via BBC Images via Pixabay and Ozark Drones on Unsplash

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‘Trump Forest’ plants trees to offset president’s climate ignorance

The Cocoon: a biodegradable vessel that nurtures tree growth in harsh and arid conditions

September 23, 2016 by  
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https://vimeo.com/164734151 The Cocoon has two primary benefits to the seedlings it houses: a safe shelter from the harsh surrounding environment and an adequate water supply to develop healthy roots during its first year. The cylindrical shelter also protects seedlings from becoming lunch for small animals, as its high walls surround the tiny plant. The process results in strong adolescent trees that do not require external irrigation, and the Cocoon disintegrates into the surrounding soil as the tree’s root structure expands. Related: Growing trees from seeds: which will work and which won’t Before planting , the Cocoon looks a bit like a bundt cake pan made from cardboard, which is to say it’s pretty plain. The biodegradable shell has super powers, though. The material is made from a variety of organic materials that the Food and Drug Administration has deemed safe for the soil, and when planted, the Cocoon creates a moat-like reservoir that ensures seedlings have all the moisture they need to thrive and grow. The addition of mycorrhizal fungi , which is present in 90 percent of the world’s forests, supports the root systems’ ability to absorb moisture and also enhance the surrounding substrate by releasing enzymes that contribute vital nutrients. Land Life Company , which produces the Cocoon, has partnered with tree-planting programs in 12 countries to help bring back plant life where it has been lost, including recently launched efforts in Peru and Chile. Other programs are already up and running in North America, Mexico, Europe, Africa, and Australia. Land Life works with local nurseries to source high quality seedlings best suited to the environment in which they will be planted, for a better chance at long-term growth of strong, independent trees. Because the Cocoon is a self-contained support system that requires little maintenance, this approach is more cost effective than traditional tree planting techniques. Land Life says the Cocoon is 10 times cheaper, in fact. That means this method can plant a lot more trees for the same budget as traditional planting methods. + The Cocoon Images via Land Life Company

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The Cocoon: a biodegradable vessel that nurtures tree growth in harsh and arid conditions

Project Urban Forest Infographic Shows How Trees Effectively Combat Carbon Emissions

October 8, 2013 by  
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Planting trees remains one of the cheapest, most effective means of drawing excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere – which is why it’s the main objective of the Sustainable Glasgow Project . They created this infographic to share some interesting facts about trees and how much carbon people produce. The Sustainable Glasgow Project funds carbon offsetting projects through the receipt of donations, and they offer individuals and organizations opportunities to offset carbon dioxide from their day to day activities by planting trees. Check out the full infographic after the jump! The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Read the rest of Project Urban Forest Infographic Shows How Trees Effectively Combat Carbon Emissions Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: carbon dioxide emissions , Climate Change , Gardening , glasgow , global warming , green design , infographic , planting trees , project urban forest , sustainable design , sustainable glasgow , tree planting , Trees        

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Project Urban Forest Infographic Shows How Trees Effectively Combat Carbon Emissions

UK Drivers Trade Their Old Cars for New Trees Through the ‘Scrap Car Plant Tree’ Program

January 11, 2013 by  
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Cars accounted for a whopping 21% of the total greenhouse gas emissions in the UK in 2009, but a creative new program from Giveacar and Trees for Cities aims to repair some of the damage caused by cars through the use of cars themselves. Scrap Car Plant Tree takes donations of cars and uses the money they get from the scrap or from the car’s auction value to plant trees across the country. Read the rest of UK Drivers Trade Their Old Cars for New Trees Through the ‘Scrap Car Plant Tree’ Program Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: beautifying urban areas in the uk by planting trees , car donations in the uk , cars as polluters of the environment , collection and disposal of cars , giveacar , greening the uk , money raised from car donations used to plant trees across the uk , one car donations funding 13 trees , planting and caring for a tree through maturity , planting trees in the uk , scrap car plant tree , trees for cities

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UK Drivers Trade Their Old Cars for New Trees Through the ‘Scrap Car Plant Tree’ Program

HOW TO: Grow an Avocado Tree from an Avocado Pit

June 25, 2012 by  
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Avocados are one of the wonderful fruits of summer . High in nutrition and flavor, nothing signals the start of summer like a zesty lime guacamole dip with tortilla chips . The next time you’re making guacamole or slicing an avocado for a salad, try saving your pits to grow into avocado trees . It’s surprisingly easy to grow your own avocado tree from seed , and it makes a great educational project for home and classrooms. Check out our handy-dandy guide below, complete with photos, to learn how to grow an avocado tree from seed . Read the rest of HOW TO: Grow an Avocado Tree from an Avocado Pit Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: avocado tree care , avocado trees indoors , bing , bing dearch engine , bing search , caring for an avocado tree from a seed , eco gardening , Gardening , gardening tips , green gardening , green gardening tips , grow an avocado tree , grow an avocado tree from a pit , grow an avocado tree from seed , growing trees indoors , how to grow a tree from a seed , how to grow an avocado tree , how to grow an avocado tree from a seed , how to plant trees , planting tips , planting trees , start growing a tree indoors , tree planting tips , what to do with avocado pits

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HOW TO: Grow an Avocado Tree from an Avocado Pit

Detroit’s Urban Agriculture Movement Could Help ‘Green’ the City

January 16, 2012 by  
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Often dubbed a “shrinking city” , Detroit has been plagued by urban decay and is known for its vacant houses and abandoned plots of land. But in some areas local residents are reinventing the urban landscape and attempting to “green” the city. Back in 1989, the organization Greening of Detroit was formed with the goal of improving the city’s suffering ecosystem. After the mass urban expansion in the last century where an estimated 500,000 trees were lost to concrete and buildings, this nonprofit had the idea of reforesting the city. Now agricultural initiatives, environmental education schemes, and community buildings are flourishing, and many open spaces are being reclaimed for planting and farming projects across the city. Read the rest of Detroit’s Urban Agriculture Movement Could Help ‘Green’ the City Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agricultural projects , city regeneration , eco design , environmental intiatives , green design , greening of detroit , planting trees , reclaimed land , sustainable design , urban decay , Urban Farming

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Detroit’s Urban Agriculture Movement Could Help ‘Green’ the City

Why Planting Trees on Farms Saves Lives

September 14, 2011 by  
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We already know that the world’s farms have more tree cover than believed , but a little more couldn’t hurt. The fact is that incorporating trees and perennial crops into food growing can be crucial way to fight drought and improve soil stability . Permaculture Magazine has a great article on the … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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