Hong Kong welcomes Veda, the first vegetarian restaurant inside upscale hotel Ovolo

February 27, 2019 by  
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Hong Kong’s vegan and vegetarian scene has proliferated in the last few years, and now the autonomous territory of China has its first vegetarian restaurant within a hotel. Veda, inside the freshly revamped Ovolo Central Hotel, is open for business. Well-known Australian vegetarian chef Hetty McKinnon devised the menu, and MALE and KplusK Associates designed the space. Despite an upsurge in the availability of veg foods, Hong Kong is still the world’s third largest per capita beef consumer, according to Beef2Live . McKinnon isn’t necessarily trying to convert everybody. She’ll be happy to reduce consumption. “I remain undaunted in my vision to win diners over with the other major food group: vegetables!” she told afoodieworld.com . “I think it’s a matter of communication — even though the food I create is vegetarian, I want people to understand you don’t have to be a vegetarian to eat it. My food is inclusive, it’s for everyone — carnivores and herbivores alike. My recipes are not centered around the ‘without’; rather they are 100 percent focused upon the ‘with’ — with food, with flavor, with texture, with creativity, with thought.” Related: These are the world’s top vegan cities Diners will find lots of Asian influences on the menu, from Nepalese momos made with ricotta, spinach and smoked chili to a congee featuring shitake mushrooms, quinoa and kale chips. Desserts include dark sponge cake and a vegan fig cheesecake with caramel sauce. While everything on the menu is vegetarian, the many vegan options are clearly marked. The Ovolo Central has a modern look. Its façade boasts a glazed black metal grid that invites ventilation and natural daylight. The hotel describes the décor of its 41 rooms as having an “edgy, rock-n-roll vibe” with many commissioned artworks. The 700 square foot Radio Suite, designed by award-winning firm ALT-254, takes up the hotel’s entire top floor for unbeatable Hong Kong views. Ovolo is a private, Hong Kong-based, family-owned hotel brand with properties in Hong Kong and Australia. McKinnon has high hopes for Veda. “Hong Kong is a sophisticated, food-loving city with truly international people, so I strongly believe that they will embrace this new, healthier way to eat,” she told afoodieworld.com. “I applaud Ovolo for their forward-thinking approach to the future of food. A predominately plant -based diet is the way of the future — without getting too political, eating meat-free is one of the single biggest ways to reduce your impact on the earth . Frankly, it’s the smarter way to eat, for your body and the planet.” + Ovolo Central Images via WEILL

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Hong Kong welcomes Veda, the first vegetarian restaurant inside upscale hotel Ovolo

Recycling can get kids free books in southern Italy

February 27, 2019 by  
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An Italian bookseller has come up with a novel way to promote recycling . Michele Gentile, who owns Ex Libris Cafe in southern Italy, is giving away free books to children in exchange for plastic bottles and aluminum cans. Michele Gentile said he thought of the recycling program, because he wanted to inspire children in the small town of Polla to read and pay attention to the environment. To that end, his book giveaway is offered to school kids who donate one aluminum can and a plastic bottle to his shop. Related: Bottle recycling in Oregon hits 90 percent record high “My goal is to spread the passion and love for books among those people in Italy who do not usually read while at the time helping the environment,” Gentile explained. The idea for the initiative came after Gentile collaborated with a nearby middle school on an aluminum recycling project. Working together, the schoolchildren and Gentile collected enough cans to purchase books for an entire classroom. His new program took off from there and has already spread into northern Italy . Gentile hopes his work will continue to make headlines and become a worldwide initiative. The free books come from customers in Gentile’s shop who have donated money to purchase a “suspended” book. The idea stems from a World War II practice in which customers would buy two coffees : one for themselves and another for the next person in line. Gentile has been using the extra books as part of his recycling initiative. While Gentile’s program is a great way to recycle and get kids to read, it also brings awareness to the growing problem of plastic waste. Single-use plastics make up around 26 percent of all the plastics in the world, only 14 percent of which are recycled. Plastics that end up in landfills take around 500 years to decompose, posing a major concern for environmentalists. Cutting down on plastic waste is important if we want to better the environment for future generations, and recycling programs like Gentile’s book giveaway are a great way to meet that goal. Via CNN Image via Public Domain Pictures

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Recycling can get kids free books in southern Italy

Veganism on the rise, record number of sign-ups for Veganuary

January 7, 2019 by  
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Could 2019 be the year of the vegan ? This past week, people all over the world promised to make lifestyle changes with various new year’s resolutions. And, this January, more people than ever have pledged to go meat-free— for at least a month. A movement known as Veganuary started five years ago, and each year the number of participants committing to a plant-based diet during the first month of the year has more than doubled. This year, more than 250,000 people in 193 countries have signed up to make January a month without animal products. According to Rich Hardy, the head of campaigns at Veganuary, on Sunday alone over 14,000 people pledged to go vegan this month, which is a rate of one person every six seconds. “In 2018 there hasn’t been a week that has gone by without veganism hitting the headlines, whether it is a magazine editor being fired or Waitrose launching a new range of products,” Hardy said. “Vegan products are getting a lot better, and it is becoming a lot more convenient to have a tasty plant-based diet .” Related: Is a flexitarian diet right for you? Hardy believes that warnings from scientists about the environmental impact of meat have persuaded many people to consider veganism. This past May, the researchers who conducted the most comprehensive analysis to date on the subject declared that the single biggest thing an individual could do for the environment is to avoid meat and dairy products. Joseph Poore of Oxford University, the lead researcher on the project, says that reducing your impact on the planet is not just about greenhouse gases, and switching to a vegan diet is more impactful than buying an electric car or cutting down on travel. Some people believe that 2018 was the year that veganism moved into the mainstream, and Hardy says that Veganuary aims to be fun and inclusive. He says that even if those who made the pledge fall off the wagon, they should just pick themselves up and remember why they signed the pledge in the first place. Via The Guardian Images via jill11

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17 easy ways to upcycle worn out sweaters

January 7, 2019 by  
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Wardrobe upcycling is nothing new. After all, when you think about it, clothing is made from cloth. Lots of other things are made from cloth. So when your clothes have served their functional purpose as attire, why not use that material for other things? Sweaters are a great example of apparel that can be given new life in a variety of ways. From leg warmers to satchels, the pieces and parts of your old sweater will serve a new purpose. If you’re onboard with refusing to trash that old sweater but don’t know what to do with it, here are some ideas to get the juices flowing. Let us know what you come up with too! Doll clothing If you have a little person in your home, you’ve likely got baby dolls or Barbies around too. It’s always fun to mix up wardrobes, even for the toys, so drag out the sewing machine and make sweaters for your kid’s pals. Sweater boots Yes, you read that right and you know they sound cozy. Sweater boots are actually just a cover for your shoes. Cut off the sleeves of your less-than-favored sweater and attach them to the sides of your shoe for an existing sole and an entirely new style. Roll over the top and add a button for a trendy appeal. Pet clothing Just because your sweater started out as human attire doesn’t mean Fido will take offense. After all, dogs get cold too. So make a few adjustments and let your discarded sweater bring warmth to the four-legged members of your home. Wine bags and gift wrap Along with brown paper, fabric has long been an ideal choice for gift wrap. It adds depth and character, plus it can be reused endless times. Wrap a square box with fabric and hand sew it together at the seam or add a fabric bow to the top. Use the sleeve or other scrap fabric to make a wine or liquor bag for a unique and cozy look to your gift. Throw pillows The bed and couch can always benefit from a facelift. Considering the amount of time you spend in, on or near both, creating new throw pillows makes perfect sense. Simply recover an old pillow with your sweater material. If you want to design a throw pillow from scratch, lay out the pattern to accentuate hems, necklines, and buttons on your finished product. Related: HOW TO: Recycle a sweater into a cuddly pillow for your couch Throw rug Following the theme of a quilt, put together a patchwork area rug for the pets, the kids’ rooms or the kitchen. Stuffed animals Some of the most adorable stuffed animals are homemade, and old sweater material offers a lovely, cozy and rustic feel. You could create a patchwork design on larger animals or use one solid piece of sweater fabric for the body of your stuffed bear, dog or monkey. Kids pants While you’re decking out the dog and the dolls, you might as well give the kiddos some winter pants too. Imagine the adorableness of tiny legs wrapped in the warmth of sweater sleeves and your design is already half-way done. Gloves, hat and scarf Sweaters represent warmth so why not carry that theme through to its second life. Use the different sections of your sweater to create fingerless gloves that could be long or short. Then make a matching scarf in the traditional long rectangular design, turn it into an infinity scarf, or even braid sweater lengths for a unique spin. A beanie hat made from the same material will pull the entire look together. Drawstring bag When you purchased your sweater many moons ago, it was likely because you liked the pattern. Keep that happiness in your life by turning it into a multi-use drawstring bag. Turn your sweater upside down and create grommets holes throughout the bottom band. This becomes the top of your bag while the rest of the sweater body forms the bag portion. Quilt The tradition of quilting goes back hundreds of years as a way to turn discarded fabric scraps into something useful. Today, sweaters can serve that purpose well. Simply collect squares of sweater fabric and layout the design you want. After sewing all the squares together, add a backing and enjoy the warmth of those old sweaters for many additional years. Hand warmers and satchels Even the smallest scraps can be put to use when upcycling your old sweaters. Sew two squares together and stuff them with lavender and/or essential oils for a lovely drawer satchel. You can make useful hand warmers in a similar way and fill them with rice. These can be heated in the microwave time after useful time. Related: Everlane introduces long-lasting outerwear made from recycled water bottles Coffee, plant or teapot cosy Sweaters are cozy and that’s the reason they make a perfect cosy. You’re probably familiar with the mainstream foam cozies sold to keep your soda cold, but what about keeping things warm? Wrapping your coffee cup in wool is a sure way to keep the heat in longer. Use a sweater sleeve to make a coffee sleeve. Embellish however you please. You can use the same idea to make cozies for your flower pots or even your teapot. Let your imagination soar! Tissue box cover Yes, these are still a thing. After all, who wouldn’t rather look at a sweater print than the mass-printed cardboard boxes that your tissue comes in? Socks or leg warmers Socks from sweaters? Yes! Warm your cold feet this winter with your favorite old sweaters. Once again, recycling sweater sleeves makes it easy to add a button and turn them into leg warmers (they’re back in style you know) or those adorable boot socks that also protect your leggings from the rough top edges of your boots. Hot pads Your kitchen benefits from the color and print, while your hands benefit from the protection. Cut squares and finish the edges or make a handmit. Either way, make sure your fabric is thick enough to protect you from burns. Headband Turn your favorite old sweater into your new favorite headband or hair scrunchy with a little creativity and some elastic. Via Apartment Therapy , Treehugger Images via Shutterstock

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12 plant-based recipes for a vegan or vegetarian Thanksgiving dinner

November 15, 2018 by  
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For many people, Thanksgiving dinner is not complete without a turkey on the table. But with diet trends turning toward vegetarianism, veganism and flexitarianism , people are starting to break away from the traditional turkey dinner for health, animal welfare or environmental reasons. Luckily, there are amazing plant-based dishes that you can prepare for a mouth-watering Thanksgiving feast, making it easier than ever to skip the turkey. Here are some ideas for main dishes that will replace the turkey on your table, plus some side dish and dessert ideas that will keep the food at your celebration completely plant-based. Main dishes Classic seitan roast Forget the tofurkey — try this basic meat substitute for a savory, meaty main dish that you can use for Thanksgiving day, and any extras will be perfect as salad toppers or sandwich fillings. This recipe comes from One Green Planet , and it does have an involved process. But the results are totally worth it. Seitan pot roast Another idea from One Green Planet , this recipe is not the traditional pot roast your mom would make, but it is the perfect recipe for a large Thanksgiving dinner. The biggest plus about this dish is that you make it in a slow cooker. Just throw everything in the pot, and let it cook while you make your other dishes. Related: 6 vegan and vegetarian turkey alternatives for Thanksgiving Lentil shepherd’s pie This recipe from Plant Based Cooking is perfect for picky eaters, vegan or not. Lentil shepherd’s pie is loaded with mushrooms, carrots, peas and garlic mashed potatoes, and you can easily refrigerate or freeze it. Vegan lentil loaf with gravy Perfect for the holiday season, this recipe from Vegan Heaven is easy to make, super healthy and beyond delicious. You will impress your family with this main dish, which takes a little over an hour to make and bake. Vegducken This is a vegetable main dish that will have your family and friends talking long after Thanksgiving is over. This recipe features roasted butternut squash stuffed with eggplant, zucchini and whole scallions. Then, you layer it with a puree of sautéed mushrooms, red onion, chickpeas, scallions, red lentils and gluten-free breadcrumbs. Side dishes Thanksgiving cornbread stuffing with gravy You might be able to skip turkey at Thanksgiving, but no one can live without the stuffing. This delicious vegan recipe from One Green Planet takes a little time to make, so you might want to prepare it a day in advance. Vegan pumpkin biscuits Free of dairy , egg, corn, soy and yeast, these pumpkin biscuits from Vegan Richa are easy to make and perfect for any guest at your Thanksgiving dinner. They feature fresh sage and thyme, and they are a savory side dish that is crisp on the outside and moist on the inside. Buttermilk vegan mashed potatoes Who says you need dairy products to make fluffy, creamy mashed potatoes? This recipe from The Vegan 8 calls for just eight ingredients to make creamy mashed potatoes that are full of flavor with a buttery taste that comes from apple cider vinegar. They will be one of the most-loved dishes at your Thanksgiving dinner. Smokey maple roasted carrots with lemon thyme drizzle If you are looking for an easy side dish that you can throw together, try this recipe from Veggies Don’t Bite . Not only is this carrot dish loaded with flavor, but the lemon thyme sauce will make you want to lick your plate clean. Related: The best in-season veggies to buy at your local market for Thanksgiving dinner Vegan green bean casserole This casserole is so creamy that you won’t believe it doesn’t contain dairy. Using raw cashews, unsweetened almond milk, bread crumbs, onions, garlic, flour, EVOO, mushrooms, white wine, soy sauce, salt and black pepper, this dish from Hummusapien will be so good, no one will know its vegan. Desserts Vegan pecan pie This recipe from the Center for Nutrition Studies is a healthy, vegan alternative to the popular holiday dessert . It is decadent, but not too sweet, and it is gluten-free and soy-free. Chocolate ganache mousse pie If you want to add a chocolate dessert to your menu, here is a delicious option that has a cookie crust and light filling that will make any chocolate lover happy. Images via Pixabay and Shutterstock

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Vegetarian diets could help avert one-third of early deaths, new research finds

April 26, 2018 by  
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Vegetarians, rejoice! While scientists have long touted the health benefits of  plant-based diets , they may be even more effective than we thought. According to new calculations from Harvard University scientists, one-third of early deaths might be avoided if people switched to a  vegetarian diet. The scientists’ research suggests that we have underestimated the positive effects of a vegetarian diet. For example, while figures from the United Kingdom’s Office for National Statistics  suggested that 141,000 deaths a year in Britain were preventable, the new research from Harvard has produced a much higher figure: about 200,000 lives could potentially be saved each year if people removed meat  from their diets . Related: Here’s what could happen if America went 100% vegan Harvard Medical School epidemiology and nutrition professor Walter Willett, a speaker at the Unite to Cure Fourth International Vatican Conference , said, “We have just been doing some calculations looking at the question of how much could we reduce mortality shifting towards a healthy, more plant based diet, not necessarily totally vegan , and our estimates are about one third of early deaths could be prevented. That’s not even talking about physical activity or not smoking, and that’s all deaths, not just cancer deaths. That’s probably an underestimate as well as that doesn’t take into account the fact that obesity is important and we control for obesity.” Committee for Responsible Medicine president Neal Barnard, another speaker at the conference, agreed that people should be more aware of the health benefits of vegetarian and vegan diets. He said, “I think we’re underestimating the effect. I think people imagine that a healthy diet has only a modest effect and a vegetarian diet might help you lose a little bit of weight. But when these diets are properly constructed I think they are enormously powerful.” Via The Telegraph Images via Lefteris kallergis on Unsplash and James Sutton on Unsplash

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6 important steps we need to take to slow down climate change

June 28, 2016 by  
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While there is a scientific consensus that global warming is real and that it is caused by human activity, whether or not climate change can be slowed down or even reversed is hotly (no pun intended) debated in the scientific community. Some climate experts such as Guy McPherson say that near-term human extinction is inevitable while other climate scientists like Michael Mann believe that it isn’t too late to save human civilization from climate catastrophe. So what actions would we need to take in order to restore a safe and stable climate? We need to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions as rapidly as possible. But that won’t be enough to reverse global warming. We must also draw down excess atmospheric CO2 by increasing natural carbon sinks. Here are six important steps we need to take to slow down climate change. Image via Wikimedia 1. RESTORE ECOSYSTEMS According to Biodiversity for a Livable Climate , “a focus on fossil fuel emissions reduction as the primary solution to reversing climate change is misguided and futile.” The organization argues that atmospheric CO2 concentrations that have exceeded 400 parts per million in Antarctica for the first time in four million years “will not decline without a significant rise in the carbon sequestration mechanisms of the biosphere.” Restoring soils, grasslands, wetlands, forests, coastal and ocean ecosystems can sequester gigatons of atmospheric carbon and cool the biosphere. Related: Leonardo DiCaprio Pledges $7 Million Towards Ocean Conservation Projects Image via Wikipedia 2. PROMOTE REGENERATIVE AGRICULTURE According to Dr. Rattan Lal, a soil scientist at Ohio State University, a two percent increase in carbon content of the planet’s soils could offset 100 percent of greenhouse gas emissions going into the atmosphere. Industrial agriculture , or factory farming, is a major contributor to global warming, emitting six billion tons of greenhouse gas emissions in 2011, or about 13 percent of total global emissions, according to the World Resources Institute. Transitioning from factory farming to carbon farming could play an important role in reversing global warming. Organically managed soils can remove carbon from the atmosphere and safely store the carbon in soil organic matter. Related: Soil Erosion Could Cause Food Crisis, Expert Warns Image via Wikimedia 3. ACHIEVE NET ZERO GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS Many countries, cities, companies and organizations around the world are committing to carbon neutrality in the coming decades. Vatican City has already achieved net zero greenhouse gas emissions by installing solar panels and Bhutan impressively has gone beyond carbon neutral to become carbon negative . Countries pledging carbon neutrality include Costa Rica, Iceland, Maldives, New Zealand, Norway, Tuvalu, Sweden and the Canadian province of British Columbia. Our transportation sector is moving toward zero emissions technology. The era of affordable electric vehicles is about to begin with the introduction of the Chevy Bolt and Tesla Model 3. And air travel could eventually become emissions-free with the Solar Impulse 2’s around-the-world flight powered entirely by solar energy demonstrating that a zero emissions future in aviation is possible. Related: Norway moves up zero emissions target to 2030 Image via Wikipedia 4. MAKE THE SWITCH TO 100% RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES In addition to pledging to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions, places around the world are working on scaling up renewable energy sources such as solar energy, wind power, geothermal, hydropower, wave power, tidal power, biofuels and biomass to replace polluting fossil fuels from the production of oil, coal and gas. The Solutions Project , started by Mark Jacobson, director of the Atmosphere and Energy Program at Stanford University, demonstrates how all 50 states can transition to 100 percent renewables by 2030 through a combination of wind, water and solar. Jacobson is currently mapping out a 139-country plan to power the world with clean, renewable energy. Places that have already achieved 100 percent renewable energy include the U.S. cities of Aspen and Burlington, the countries of Iceland and Norway and the Canadian province of Quebec. Cities pledging to shift to 100 percent renewable energy include San Diego, San Francisco, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Munich and Sydney. Related: San Diego to become largest U.S. city to run on 100% renewable energy Image via Wikimedia 5. IMPROVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY Energy efficiency investments have enormous potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. According to the International Energy Agency’s  Energy Efficiency Market Report 2015 , energy efficiency improvements since 1990 prevented more than 870 million tons of carbon emissions in 2014 and 10 billion tons over the last 25 years. The International Energy Agency says that energy efficiency is “the most effective tool to reduce energy sector carbon emissions, accounting for more than 40 percent of the required reductions to limit global warming to 2 degrees centigrade.” Examples of energy efficiency include LED lighting, natural lighting, ENERGY STAR-certified appliances, passive solar heating and turbochargers in cars and airplanes. Image via Pexels 6. SWITCH TO A PLANT-BASED DIET A new study  by Oxford University researchers published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that transitioning to vegetarian diets could cut food-related greenhouse gas emissions 63 percent by 2050 and that switching to vegan diets could reduce carbon emissions by 70 percent. Currently, the food system is responsible for more than a quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions and a recent report from think tank Chatham House found that eating less meat and adopting a plant-based diet is crucial to meeting the climate targets set forth in the Paris agreement and avoiding dangerous global warming. Lead image via Wikimedia

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James Cameron asks us to fight climate change by eating less meat and dairy

November 20, 2015 by  
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James Cameron, most notable for his direction of award-winning films and deep-sea diving endeavors, is wearing a new hat in the public arena as an avid environmentalist. Not only does he have plans to ensure the production of the Avatar sequels is entirely net energy neutral , he recently spoke at the Greenbuild conference about replacing conventional building construction with more environmentally responsible methods as the world’s population grows. Yet, Cameron’s latest mission is to educate the public on how something most folks do every day is contributing to global warming: eating meat and dairy . Read the rest of James Cameron asks us to fight climate change by eating less meat and dairy

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USDA may finally recommend eating less beef to save the environment

January 8, 2015 by  
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The U.S. Department of Agriculture could finally add environmental concerns to their list of dietary recommendations. According to the Associated Press, the advisory panel in charge of dietary guidelines admits that a sustainable diet is key to protecting food access now and in the future. That means they could include it in the USDA’s new dietary guidelines when they’re updated later this year and start calling on Americans to add more plant-based foods to their diets while reducing meat consumption. Read the rest of USDA may finally recommend eating less beef to save the environment Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Climate Change , department of agriculture , dietary guidelines , dietary recommendations , eating less meat , emissions , Environment , environmental concerns , government , greenhouse gases , Health , plant-based , plant-based diet , usda , vegan , vegetarian , water issues

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USDA may finally recommend eating less beef to save the environment

Study confirms Ohio experienced the largest fracking-related earthquake ever

January 8, 2015 by  
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A  new study has confirmed that recent earthquakes in Poland Township , Ohio in March of 2014 were caused by hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking. According to the study, the fracking has caused “scores” of small earthquakes including one, a magnitude 3.0, that was the largest fracking-related earthquake ever recorded. The oil and gas wells operated by Hilcorp Energy that caused the earthquake were shut down two days after the earthquakes were felt. Read the rest of Study confirms Ohio experienced the largest fracking-related earthquake ever Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: earthquake , earthquakes caused by fracking , fracking , fracking regulations in ohio , hydraulic fracking , hydraulic fracturing , OHIO , ohio earthquakes , ohio fracking , Ohio fracking earthquakes , Ohio hydraulic fracking , oil and gas , petroleum , poland township

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