In stopping climate change, time is as important as tech

March 1, 2021 by  
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In stopping climate change, time is as important as tech Jonathan Foley Mon, 03/01/2021 – 01:30 This article originally appeared on the author’s personal blog, and was written in that capacity. Italics are the author’s. The only sure path to stop climate change is to zero out greenhouse gas emissions as soon as possible. That’s it. As simple as this sounds, it’s going to be an  enormous  job,  requiring hard work  over the coming decades. But I find that most people don’t understand the time dimensions of the problem very well. A useful way to think about the effort and timescales required is to consider the ” Carbon Law ,” which was coined by my friend Johan Rockström. Despite the name, this isn’t a physical “law” of the universe but rather a set of recommendations. So, what does the Carbon Law say? It says to limit global warming to less than 2 degrees Celsius, as outlined in the Paris Accords, we need to severely restrict the  total, cumulative amount of greenhouse gases  we release into the atmosphere moving forward. This idea is called the  “remaining carbon budget”  and refers to how much carbon dioxide (and other gases) we can still emit before warming the planet beyond a particular target. The more we burn, the warmer the planet gets. To keep within the remaining carbon budget for 2 degrees C, we have to cut our emissions drastically, reaching net-zero emissions as soon as possible. But cutting emissions takes time, so we have to find a balance between the severity and speed of these efforts. The Carbon Law outlines a possible path forward. It shows how we can limit the cumulative amount of greenhouse gases we emit in the future and quickly reach “net-zero” emissions. The path illustrated by the Carbon Law limits the warming of the planet to less than 2 degreesC while giving us some time to make the transition. But the speed and severity of the required cuts are still breathtaking. According to the Carbon Law, we need to peak greenhouse gas emissions roughly now — and then cut them in half in the 2020s. That’s not all. The Carbon Law says we need to cut them in half again in the 2030s. And then in half again in the 2040s. Alongside these deep emissions cuts, the Carbon Law suggests ramping up carbon removal projects , which will take many years to develop and deploy at sufficient scale, between now and 2050. Together, leading with steep emissions cuts early on, with carbon removal building up later, we can get to “net-zero” emissions around 2050, limit our cumulative emissions moving forward, and limit global warming to 2 degrees C. Let me illustrate how this might work with a simplified version of the Carbon Law. Historically, greenhouse gas emissions rose from about 27 Gigatons-CO2equivalent/year in 1970 to about 50 Gt-CO2e/yr in 2020. According to the Carbon Law, we need to stop this rise and hit peak emissions as soon as possible (Figure 1). Figure 1. Historical Greenhouse Gas Emissions. This includes all anthropogenic greenhouse gases, not just CO2. The total is expressed as an equivalent amount of CO2, using a single “global warming potential” for a 100-year window. Data from IPCC and the Global Carbon Project. Graphic by Jonathan Foley © 2021. Then we should cut emissions by about 50 percent in this decade, bringing them down to about 25 Gt-CO2e/yr around 2030 (Figure 2). Notice that this is a much steeper decline than the emissions rise that came before. It’s a  big  cut, no matter how you look at it. Figure 2. A simplified version of the Carbon Law, where we cut total emissions by ~50 percent in the first decade. (In the original Carbon Law paper, the authors considered energy & industrial emissions separately from land use. Here I combined them for simplicity. The general lesson is the same.) To achieve such rapid cuts in emissions, we need to deploy the fastest possible climate solutions. To me, this would include halting climate-destructive practices such as tropical deforestation, flaring and fugitive emissions of methane, and “black carbon” emissions from biomass burning, dirty cookstoves and other sources. These would have an immediate effect on the atmosphere. Other “quick wins” can come from rapid and cost-effective improvements in efficiency. There are  enormous  opportunities to be more efficient with electricity (especially in buildings and industry), food (where about 30–40 percent is wasted globally), industrial processes, transportation (higher fuel efficiency, more alternative transportation), and buildings (improved building envelopes, building automation and reduced refrigerant leaks). In addition, we will have to rapidly shut down fossil fuel energy sources and deploy renewable energy systems across the planet as quickly as possible. But given the enormous physical infrastructure and capital involved, this inevitably will take time. Even the most aggressive scenarios of this energy transition require the 2020s and 2030s to complete. We are in a race to stop climate change, and we will have to use the fastest solutions we’ve got. And those are usually the ones already on the shelf. After cutting emissions by about 50 percent in the 2020s, we have to keep going and cut emissions in half again in the 2030s and in the 2040s (Figure 3). Figure 3. And then we cut emissions by another ~50 percent in the 2030s and 2040s. I wish we could cut emissions to zero, period, before 2050, but this framework acknowledges that it may be very difficult to eliminate  all  greenhouse gas emissions by then. We’ll see. But if we assume that  some  emissions may continue in the 2040s, we will need to start relying on  carbon removal  — powered by nature (with trees, soil, or oceans) or technology. A lot of business and technology leaders are  very  enthusiastic about carbon removal right now. But don’t get too excited just yet. It’s going to take a  long time  to make a difference. In fact, the total sum of carbon removal projects done to date — whether with trees, crops, cattle, rock weathering, or technology —  isn’t even measurable in the atmosphere yet . Because carbon removal projects are still  very  small, the Carbon Law allows time for them to spin up between now and 2050 (Figure 4). In this scenario, carbon removal starts to take off in the 2030s and 2040s. Figure 4. As we cut emissions heavily in the first decades of the Carbon Law approach, we allow time for carbon removal projects to scale up by the 2040s, balancing out the remaining emissions. Together, the drastic cuts in emissions, front-loaded to the 2020s, with ongoing cuts in the 2030s and 2040s, combined with the ramp-up of large-scale carbon removal by the 2040s, would help us achieve net-zero emissions around 2050 (Figure 5). Figure 5. Together, the steep emissions cuts today and gradual increase in carbon removal later lets us reach net-zero by 2050. It’s important to stress this is  one possible way  we can stop climate change in the future. How we actually get there will likely be different. But the Carbon Law teaches us to focus on  deep and rapid  emissions cuts first, with continued cuts for decades, followed by the gradual build-out of carbon removal later. This sounds reasonable, but the most challenging part — that worries me the most — is that we have to  cut emissions   in half this decade. That’s a huge job, no matter how you look at it. To put this in perspective, the Carbon Law says we have to cut emissions more in this decade than emissions grew in the  previous five decades combined . Figure 6. A huge amount of the work we need to do today, according to the Carbon Law, is reduce emissions by 50 percent before 2030. How are we going to cut emissions in half in a decade? Simply put: We need to act  fast , without delay. We have to start with tools on hand, and not wait for new ones that may (or may not) appear in the future. This is important to remember. Time  is the most crucial parameter here, not whether we have the best possible tools. We have already squandered decades debating and denying climate change — a form of ” predatory delay ” that benefitted big polluters. But we’ve wasted all the time we can, and we cannot delay any longer. We will need to do everything we can to cut emissions in half during this decade. That means no more waiting. No more delays. Not even well-intended ones, including waiting for better technologies that can help reduce emissions a little better. We have to get started today and fold in any new tools that become available as we go along. As venture capitalist and entrepreneur  Ibrahim AlHusseini  likes to say,  “Now is better than new.”  And he’s right. I’d maybe add, ” Time is as important as tech.” Topics Climate Change Corporate Strategy Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Image by Shutterstory/BrAt82

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In stopping climate change, time is as important as tech

Industrial decarbonization picks up steam

March 1, 2021 by  
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Industrial decarbonization picks up steam Sarah Golden Mon, 03/01/2021 – 01:00 This article originally appeared in the State of Green Business 2021. You can download the entire report here . The industrial sector is the backbone of the economy, producing the materials that build everything from cities to phones. It’s also a significant contributor to the climate crisis: Industrial processes — from the creation of raw materials to chemicals — are responsible for more emissions than any other sector, making up a third of greenhouse gas emissions globally. Increasingly, the stars are aligning for industrial emissions to take center stage, for three key reasons: demand for clean solutions is growing; technologies are maturing; and the conditions for policy solutions are ripe. The emissions associated with manufacturing and other heavy industries could broadly be divided into three categories : indirect energy (from purchased electricity and heat, responsible for about 44 percent of emissions); industrial processes (such as the use of chemicals that release greenhouse gases, 19 percent); and onsite combustion (37 percent, usually for heat processing). All three are in urgent need of innovations and deployments, but the last of those three — combustion — has, until now, received the least attention. Climate-conscious companies that depend on thermal processing — used to produce everything from food to ferrous metals — seek better solutions. Historically, these have been inadequate or unaffordable, but a new generation of technologies is promising to change that. For example, in 2019 L’Oréal USA announced that 14 of its factories were “carbon neutral,” and the beauty giant continues to look for renewable options for all of its thermal loads as part of its science-based targets. U.S. Steel Corporation had a goal to reduce its emission intensity by 20 percent by 2030, based on 2018 baseline levels. While a modest target, the commitment is an acknowledgment that the sector needs to make progress, as steel is one of the most emission-intensive sectors (together with cement and chemicals). Companies are banding together to reach breakthroughs faster. In 2019, General Motors, Cargill, Mars and L’Oreal USA formed the Renewable Thermal Collaborative (RTC), and since have been joined by more than a dozen other large energy users. Modeled after the success of the Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance , which brought together large energy purchasers to accelerate the availability and affordability of renewable power, the RTC provides a space for companies to learn best practices to decarbonize manufacturing. Climate-conscious companies that depend on thermal processing — used to produce everything from food to ferrous metals — seek better solutions. “These companies and other institutions are trying to send a signal to the marketplace: If people can produce renewable thermal technology that is cost-effective, there are buyers out there that want them,” said David Gardiner, a facilitator of the RTC, in an interview with GreenBiz . Companies are also pushing for industrial decarbonization outside their four walls. Apple, for example, last year announced a carbon-neutrality target throughout its entire supply chain . As more organizations follow suit, corporations can leverage their market influence to help accelerate the deployment of cleaner industrial processes. Finding renewable alternatives for industrial heat is a complicated business. Different applications require different working temperatures, which necessitate different solutions. Some applications — such as cooking, pressurizing and sterilization — require lower temperatures (150 to 250 degrees Fahrenheit), while chemical, concrete and steel processes require much higher temperatures (above 400 F). Today, most process heating in the United States is fueled by natural gas, which can be plugged into many technologies and which already enjoys a robust infrastructure. Globally, coal meets the majority of thermal fuel demands for both steel and cement. Renewable options, on the other hand, often require specialized equipment that is still early-stage and may require retraining or operational shifts, which add costs. While many consumer-facing brands want renewable options, most are price-sensitive and unwilling to pay a premium for these cleaner technologies, especially during a time of rock-bottom natural gas prices. Moreover, clean technologies are at different stages of innovation, feasibility and cost, all with their own constraints, including temperature, quality and flow rates. Key pathways to decarbonize thermal energy include: Efficiency. An oldie but a goodie, the promise of deep efficiency still has not been fully realized. According to energy-efficiency expert Amory Lovins , whole-system redesign today can yield 30 to 60 percent of energy savings in retrofits and 40 to 90 percent savings in new construction. Electrification. While innovations are emerging quickly for applications ranging from roasting coffee to alloying steel , the technologies are expensive and require specific equipment. Still, costs are falling quickly and experts anticipate wide-scale adoption of electric appliances for industrial applications in the coming decade. Green hydrogen. The perennial “fuel of tomorrow,” it has long tantalized experts, who envision that excess renewable power can be used to create hydrogen, which can be plugged into applications as easily as natural gas. However, because hydrogen molecules are much smaller than methane molecules, today’s natural gas infrastructure is too leaky to hold or transport hydrogen. Expect this to be in the R&D phase with limited deployment for onsite applications until midcentury . Biomethane. Capturing methane emissions from dairies, landfills and wastewater treatment facilities holds great promise. While seductive, the resulting fuel (sometimes called renewable natural gas, or RNG) has a limited supply (it could cover only 3 to 7 percent of natural gas used today) and issues with land use (large dairies impact surrounding, low-income communities). Meanwhile, natural gas utilities are overstating its potential to justify infrastructure investments, which runs the risk of slowing electrification of appliances that already have market-ready electric alternatives. Additional technologies include solar thermal, geothermal, nuclear, cogeneration and carbon capture and storage. All have economic and technical tradeoffs, and with corporations and policymakers backing the transition, innovators have a lot to gain by cracking the renewable thermal energy code. Robust policy support will be key to rapidly scaling the transition. Despite corporate commitments to decarbonize, emissions from heavy industry are on track to rise 0.4 percent annually through 2050 — at a time when they need to be dropping precipitously. According to 30 leading experts on energy and policy, high-impact policies to decarbonize industry include carbon pricing, government support for R&D, industrial process emissions standards and energy-efficiency support. It bodes well that decarbonization is seen as a boon for the economy. The good news is many of these policies align with components of President Joe Biden’s climate plan , which include financial support for innovation and deployment, boosting markets through federal purchase requirements, and workforce training and education. The new administration also has placed a specific emphasis on industrial heat needed for steel, concrete and chemicals. Policy also has an important role in supporting financing on these innovations. Given that new infrastructure development works on roughly 25-year cycles, policy direction now can help us avoid making climate-busting investments down the highway. While time will tell if the Biden administration will realize all its goals, it bodes well that decarbonization is seen as a boon for the economy. Rewiring America research shows how decarbonizing the economy can create around 25 million jobs in the United States alone. According to separate reports from Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy and the Industrial Innovation Initiative (I3) , a coalition of industry, NGO and public sector players dedicated to decarbonizing industry, investment in R&D for clean breakthroughs will stimulate jobs and economic growth. Meanwhile, Bill Gates’ Breakthrough Energy commissioned a report that crunched the numbers to show that the spillover economic gains from such an investment would be significant — all of which bodes well for political action. Pull Quote Climate-conscious companies that depend on thermal processing — used to produce everything from food to ferrous metals — seek better solutions. It bodes well that decarbonization is seen as a boon for the economy. Topics Energy & Climate State of Green Business Report Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Image by Shutterstock/Nostal6ie Close Authorship

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Industrial decarbonization picks up steam

PepsiCo CSO on embedding sustainability into ‘day-to-day business’

February 1, 2021 by  
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PepsiCo CSO on embedding sustainability into ‘day-to-day business’ Heather Clancy Mon, 02/01/2021 – 02:00 The number of companies proclaiming their intent to go net-zero by 2050 has expanded exponentially in the past 12 months, but the ones short-cutting that commitment by a decade are a rarer breed. In mid-January, PepsiCo joined that club with a strategy to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent across its entire value chain by 2030 and to reach the elusive net-zero emissions status 10 years before it’s called for by the Paris Agreement. The latter commitment is one touted by members of The Climate Pledge, orchestrated by Amazon and Global Optimism, although PepsiCo isn’t a member of that campaign as of this writing. The same week that PepsiCo announced its new ambition, the company’s foundation extended the terms of its 14-year-long relationship with the Inter-American Development Bank — with initiatives including a fund meant to promote the inclusion of women in regenerative, sustainable agricultural models in Latin America. The extension will see $6 million more invested through 2026, initially in the Dominican Republic, Ecuador and Guatemala. Even though the foundation is a separate entity, there is a close link between its mission and the company’s sustainability goals, according to senior executives. These initiatives, for example, are thought of in terms of years rather than months. “We have to have the certainty that the community will invest the time and willingness to go on with a program for several years, and we need to create awareness,” said PepsiCo’s Latin America CEO, Paula Santilli, when I asked her about how communities are selected. “We choose mathematically and analytically and concentrate on those communities on the wrong side of the poverty line.” I’ve got history in sustainability, but I’m a business guy. In addition to Santilli, I recently chatted with PepsiCo Chief Sustainability Officer Jim Andrew about the link between sustainability and community development, as well as the strategy behind some other developments announced as part of its updated climate strategy — such as its new Sustainable from the Start product development philosophy and two new internal carbon pricing programs meant to embed climate-centric thinking into everyday business decisions. Andrew, an avid scuba diver who joined PepsiCo about 4.5 years ago after heading strategy and innovation at Royal Philips, took over as CSO after Simon Lowden retired last fall. “I think speed is of the essence, not just for PepsiCo, but for the whole world, for the planet and all the people in it,” Andrew told me when I asked for the motivation behind the accelerated goal. Following is a transcript of our discussion, edited for clarity and length. The Frito-Lay facility in Modesto, California. PepsiCo accelerates efforts to build a more resilient and sustainable food system, reducing absolute GHG emissions more than 4 percent by 2030 across entire value chain and pledging to net-zero emissions by 2040. Photo courtesy of PepsiCo Heather Clancy: The goals were finalized alongside the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Did that experience influence the final shape of the climate goals? Was anything adapted or reconsidered because of what was going on? Jim Andrew: Certainly COVID-19 has been a challenge for everyone on multi levels. But what I think it’s done, it’s really shone a light on the need to be even bolder and move even faster. What has it done? It has, I think, sharpened the focus on the need to move urgently. We all saw that the food system is probably more fragile than we thought. We saw that the need for a food system that is sustainable, that is regenerative, that is inclusive, it’s probably bigger than we thought. In that respect, it didn’t influence what we wanted to do, but it probably helped re-emphasize the need to be big and be fast. Clancy: You mentioned a couple of interim goals to the 2040 one. I’m just curious if you have other short-term milestones that we should expect or watch for. What should we watch for? And how will PepsiCo disclose them? Andrew: You should watch for transparency, consistency and regularity in our reporting. We are completely open in that. Any goal we set, believe me, there’s a lot of work behind coming up with those goals. We put as much work into ensuring transparent reporting because it helps us be accountable — both internally and externally, candidly — and also helps us track progress. We’re a company that likes to set a big objective out there and then go get it. One of the big parts of my job is mobilizing the organization. I’ve got history in sustainability, but I’m a business guy. I didn’t major in environmental science. I’m a business guy working to drive in partnership with our CEO, Ramon Laguarta, and the rest of my executive peers to really drive the organization forward. Having clear goals, having really good data integrity, is at the heart of all of our ESG reporting. That’s important because then we know how we’re doing. It also builds trust. That’s something that we take really importantly. So what are you going to see from us? We’re going to report our progress annually in our sustainability report. We have one coming up in a few months and will be happy to talk to you again, when that comes out. Anytime we can provide real-time updates, we will. All of the reporting entities, we’re in alignment with — the Global Reporting Initiative, the CDP, the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures. We just issued our first [TCFD] report. So, we are going to be transparent; you’re going see it on a regular basis. Our objective is set some bold goals, and then go get them and hold ourselves accountable. Clancy: Since you brought it up, how will you engage the PepsiCo organization to deliver, especially when we’re all in this new age of remote work? Andrew: It’s been incredibly exciting to me to see just in four months the level of excitement in our organization. We’re 260,000-odd people around the world, 200-plus countries and territories. We’re a big complex organization, but there’s a level of interest and excitement. People get it. You ask me, how am I going to engage? There’s three things that you’ve got to do. The first is you’ve got to excite people. With PepsiCo, when you announce an ambitious goal, like our climate goal, people get excited and they get energized. Honestly, a lot of our partners — our bottlers, our co-manufacturers, our suppliers — I’ve had a lot of people reach out to me and say, “Hey, this is really exciting. How can we help? We’re in on it.” So the first thing you got to do internally and also externally is excite and a big goal does that. You know, make no small plans? I think that’s one of the real keys to make sustainability work. You got to embed it in the business strategy, the business processes and the actions everybody takes every day. The second is, there is a level of education that’s important. When we talk to people internally about regenerative agriculture, Scope 3 emissions, those are terms that to most people are new. So we need to introduce those terms. We need to educate people on why the goals matter, but most importantly, how are we going to achieve them. Because that’s what it’s all really about, and we’re doing that across the company. Because we’re Scope 3, it’s got to be across your whole supply chain. We’ve rolled out, as part of the climate goal, a really well-done employee training program specific to our employees to help them understand the role of us as a company, and then the role of them as individuals. What can they do to mitigate climate change? And then finally, it’s about engagement, it’s how do we take that excitement, take that education and then really engage people to drive real action. Because ultimately, it’s about action, it’s about results, it’s about moving the needle. And so that’s everything from, how do we give people the tools? How do we put it in their incentives? How do we talk about it on a regular basis? How do we measure it clearly, because what gets measured gets done, all those things. So: Excite, Educate and Engage. Clancy: How will the Sustainable from the Start Program be implemented, and which product divisions will be first to adopt it? Andrew: That’s a great question, because this is one of my real beliefs and one of my real emphases, which is how do you get sustainability not as something that happens “over there,” but that is really part of the day-to-day business, part of the day-to-day work. Because if it’s part of what we do every day, then it happens and that’s how you really drive action. So, we’re looking at where there are business processes where we can embed sustainability. New product development is a great example. Everybody, every part of the company is interested in and cares about what happens in new product development. So we started this program called Sustainable from the Start, and it really puts sustainability at the heart of product design and new product development, because what it does is it encourages, but it also enables product development teams to make environmental impact a part of their decision-making from the very beginning as they think about the whole product life cycle. We’ve rolled out some tools that really help, because you’ve got to make it simple. The less friction that we can introduce, the easier it’s going to be. So we gave people a set of tools, so that they can estimate, for example, the carbon and the water footprint of products and development, and what are the choices that they make early that are going to affect those footprints. And then they can compare that data to some best practice benchmarks that we’ve built in, so they know what good looks like and they can make more informed decisions. Things like recyclability impediments. If people don’t know, they will not be able to make the kind of decisions that they will if they’re informed. That gets back to the education point I was making as well. If they’re informed and they’re energized and they’re motivated, then they’re going to make decisions that will have big impacts as we move through the life cycle. A big focus of the Sustainable from the Start program is reducing GHG emissions, sure, but also things like discouraging the use of non-recyclable packaging, because that’s really important. So we’ve conducted life-cycle analyses, carbon footprints. We’ve done it for about a quarter of all of our brands now, and we’ve got plans to get all of them done. When you’re a company as big as PepsiCo, you’ve got a lot of brands, so it takes a little while to go through. We’ll have more to share on this — again, transparency, openness. But it’s a great business tool that we’re actively embedding, so that people are thinking about this, from the beginning, as a part of their day-to-day jobs. Because I think that’s one of the real keys to make sustainability work. You got to embed it in the business strategy, the business processes and the actions everybody takes every day. A farmer gives her livestock water in Cucungara, Peru. The success of infrastructure projects piloted by PepsiCo and the IDB in these rural communities has attracted additional support from international public sector partners that has been used to fund new infrastructure, including pipe systems and treatment plants. Photo courtesy of PepsiCo Clancy: Can you share more detail about the internal carbon pricing programs? Why are you embracing them now? Did they take effect? When will they take effect? Andrew: That’s another great example of where we’re trying to take environmental sustainability considerations and just put them in the normal flow of business. So, we’re going to have to collaborate and get employees involved, and also partners and suppliers and everything. There’s a couple that we mentioned. One is, how do we eliminate the carbon impact of employee business air travel? A lot of people travel; a lot of people may or may not fully understand what the implications are of that. What we have done is we have said that anytime any employee is going to travel by air for business, we’re going to put a price on that. And then we’re going to take that money, and we’re going to deploy it with a third party into our supply chain. It’s not something that’s out there, it’s put into our supply chain, to fully eliminate the impact of the emissions from that flight. And it’s flight by flight. And it allows every employee, every time they book a flight, to see that their choice has an impact and also that we as a company will do something. Again, it’s about how do you excite people because people get excited about, “Hey, I can do something.” It’s about how you educate them, because it’s right there, it’s going to be in the booking tool. We are programming it, as we speak. Then it’s ultimately about how you engage them, so they go do something. So that’s one. We’re rolling it out now. By the middle of this year, it’ll be up and running, full go. Then we’re also looking at how we build the carbon impact into carrier selection for third-party logistics. We’re working with our procurement team, so that the climate goals are a part of the consideration when they’re choosing carriers. Because what this will do is it will help you enforce, again, climate considerations and business decisions, which will help drive GHG reductions. And then we’re going to learn from these things, and we’re going to look for where can we continue to expand across other business processes, ways to just embed this into the everyday thinking in activities. Clancy: Those are great examples. Thank you for being so specific. Andrew: The carrier selection is being piloted right now. The employee air travel right now, obviously, we’ve got to do a little programming and not a lot of people are flying a whole lot right now. But the carrier selection program is being piloted right now. Clancy: The pandemic has underscored the fragility of the recycling infrastructure around the world, as well as the food system. What new investments is PepsiCo making to improve collection? And what steps are you taking to increase the use of recycled content in your packaging? Andrew: We have a very clear vision, and that’s a world where packaging never becomes waste. That is front and center for everything we do in packaging. There’s really three things that we have to [enforce that policy]. The first is reduce plastic use. The second is improve recycling, and the third is reinvent our packaging. Let me talk about those now and answer your question. To improve recycling, especially as you say, given some of the challenges, this is a systemic change that is necessary and it requires a lot of partnerships across the full value chain. It requires collaboration between the public sector and the private sector. And it really is how do we work together end-to-end for a circular economy for plastics? We set goals, and then we go and we work really hard to go achieve them. But you’ve got to be transparent along the way about what’s working, what’s not. Specifically to your question, in the last three years, we’ve pledged more than $65 million globally for recycling and collection. A little over a year ago we issued our first green bond. It was a $1 billion green bond. We’ve allocated just about half of that, I think it was $447 million, of the proceeds to projects that advance sustainability. Roughly $200 million of that was specifically to procure recycled PET in our North American beverage packaging. You want to talk about creating a market, that’s creating a market. We have brands, whole brands that are [using] 100 percent recycled PET in Europe. We’ve targeted 100 percent recycled PET in nine countries for our lineup of Pepsi-branded beverage bottles by the end of 2022. We’re working to both support the recycling infrastructure in partnership with other people in the supply chain, public entities, competitors, because this is something that we all have to work on. And then we’re also working at driving demand because if we drive demand and make clear what our commitments are, that helps support the investments that people need to make all along the chain. [Editor’s note: PepsiCo brands using 100 percent PET for their packaging include LIFEWTR, Tazo Tea and Naked Juice.] Clancy: The PepsiCo Foundation has invested considerably in cultivating economic growth and opportunities for women and disadvantaged communities around the world. How does the PepsiCo corporate sustainability team collaborate on those projects? How do they shape the execution of your strategy? How are they aligned? Andrew: We work very closely with the foundation. Again, this is a great example of where we work to use the scale and the reach that PepsiCo has to have a positive impact really across communities around the world, where we operate and to really show some leadership in helping to build a food system that’s sustainable, regenerative and inclusive, to your point. So what we’re always trying to do is work on both people and planet. The foundation and the business have very much those objectives. A good example of collaboration — in addition to the climate news we announced — was the announcement where PepsiCo, in particular our Latin American operations, with our CEO there, Paula Santilli, and the PepsiCo Foundation announced that they are expanding the social and environmental impact partnership that we have with the Inter-American Development Bank. We will go another five years through 2026. It’s a nearly $6 million investment. It builds on the heels of what has been a very successful investment in a partnership over the last 14 years. Over the last 14 years, we’ve supported about 19 million people across Latin America and the Caribbean, on five big pillars of things that are really, really important: water access; nutrition; sustainable agriculture; inclusive recycling; and disaster relief programs. There’s a great example of where the business, the foundation and third parties have been able to collaborate in ways that are more powerful. It’s one of those one plus one plus one equals probably seven. A lot of people have had been helped by a partnership that none of the organizations could do by themselves. Clancy: What’s on your mind right now that I haven’t asked about that you feel like we should talk about more? Andrew: This is something I’ve been thinking about a lot. The challenges that the world is facing, when it comes to climate — again, go back to our recent climate announcement, which is top of mind — are challenges where no company, no government, no NGO can do it themselves. The need for collaboration, for partnership, for working together, has never been higher. These are difficult challenges. These are not things that can be solved by any one entity, and they’re not things that are there to be solved overnight. But they are also things that we can’t wait on. The science is clear, the need is clear; the time to act is now. All of us have to find partners to move forward. There’s going to be some mistakes, there’s going be some things that won’t work but together, we have to work together, find those areas of common interest and where we can complement each other, and then move forward with urgency. That’s why we looked and said: “We want big goals, we want goals that will motivate not only ourselves internally, but also other folks externally.” I’ve gotten a lot of calls from people saying, “Hey, great, how do we team up? I see you’re interested in this; how can we work together on that?” That’s what we need. I wake up every day, I wake up every morning, and I worry about what’s going on and sustainability and how PepsiCo is going to drive forward and meet our goals and move the needle on things. But I also think about, how can we do that with others? So, to me, that’s so important and I’m not sure that is fully appreciated by everybody who needs to work together. Clancy: There is a certain amount of skepticism about some of these big alliances right now. How do you keep them relevant and authentic? Andrew: You have to be open, transparent; you’ve got to build trust; and then you’ve got to show results. I think if those things happen, a lot of problems are going to take care of themselves. Back to the question you asked about milestones, transparency. We don’t set goals that we don’t think we can achieve. We don’t know always how we’re going to achieve them because they are big goals, and they’re bold, and they’re aggressive. But that’s what’s needed. But we don’t set ones just to get a headline or, as much as I love talking to you, we don’t set big goals just to be able to go do interviews. We set goals, and then we go and we work really hard to go achieve them. But you’ve got to be transparent along the way about what’s working, what’s not. How are we doing? Clancy: I just have one last question. What’s your most important priority as a chief sustainability officer at this time? Andrew: Oh, that’s easy. I’ve probably got the best job in the company because I get a combination of the chief sustainability role, and also some business responsibilities, which are all about sustainability. But the most important thing is easy, which is achieving the goals we’ve set. That’s hard to do, but easy to say. But that’s the priority. Ultimately it’s about how do we make the planet better for both the planet and for the people on the planet. How do we drive forward results around climate? How do we reduce emissions? How do we increase our renewable electricity to 100 percent globally? How do we end up at net-zero? That’s what is the most important part of my job. That’s what motivates me, because that’s what ultimately will show up and create real change. I need to work with a whole lot of people internally — 260,000 people have all got to be pulling in that direction. It starts at the top and goes all the way down to our frontline workers, but it also is true externally. But that’s my priority 1, 2, 3, working in every way that I can, with everybody to help us achieve the results that we know are necessary for the planet and the people on it. Pull Quote I’ve got history in sustainability, but I’m a business guy. I think that’s one of the real keys to make sustainability work. You got to embed it in the business strategy, the business processes and the actions everybody takes every day. We set goals, and then we go and we work really hard to go achieve them. But you’ve got to be transparent along the way about what’s working, what’s not. Topics Corporate Strategy Corporate Social Responsibility Net-Zero Carbon Pricing Collective Insight The GreenBiz Interview Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off PepsiCo CSO Jim Andrew

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PepsiCo CSO on embedding sustainability into ‘day-to-day business’

PepsiCo CSO on embedding sustainability into ‘day-to-day business’

February 1, 2021 by  
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PepsiCo CSO on embedding sustainability into ‘day-to-day business’ Heather Clancy Mon, 02/01/2021 – 02:00 The number of companies proclaiming their intent to go net-zero by 2050 has expanded exponentially in the past 12 months, but the ones short-cutting that commitment by a decade are a rarer breed. In mid-January, PepsiCo joined that club with a strategy to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent across its entire value chain by 2030 and to reach the elusive net-zero emissions status 10 years before it’s called for by the Paris Agreement. The latter commitment is one touted by members of The Climate Pledge, orchestrated by Amazon and Global Optimism, although PepsiCo isn’t a member of that campaign as of this writing. The same week that PepsiCo announced its new ambition, the company’s foundation extended the terms of its 14-year-long relationship with the Inter-American Development Bank — with initiatives including a fund meant to promote the inclusion of women in regenerative, sustainable agricultural models in Latin America. The extension will see $6 million more invested through 2026, initially in the Dominican Republic, Ecuador and Guatemala. Even though the foundation is a separate entity, there is a close link between its mission and the company’s sustainability goals, according to senior executives. These initiatives, for example, are thought of in terms of years rather than months. “We have to have the certainty that the community will invest the time and willingness to go on with a program for several years, and we need to create awareness,” said PepsiCo’s Latin America CEO, Paula Santilli, when I asked her about how communities are selected. “We choose mathematically and analytically and concentrate on those communities on the wrong side of the poverty line.” I’ve got history in sustainability, but I’m a business guy. In addition to Santilli, I recently chatted with PepsiCo Chief Sustainability Officer Jim Andrew about the link between sustainability and community development, as well as the strategy behind some other developments announced as part of its updated climate strategy — such as its new Sustainable from the Start product development philosophy and two new internal carbon pricing programs meant to embed climate-centric thinking into everyday business decisions. Andrew, an avid scuba diver who joined PepsiCo about 4.5 years ago after heading strategy and innovation at Royal Philips, took over as CSO after Simon Lowden retired last fall. “I think speed is of the essence, not just for PepsiCo, but for the whole world, for the planet and all the people in it,” Andrew told me when I asked for the motivation behind the accelerated goal. Following is a transcript of our discussion, edited for clarity and length. The Frito-Lay facility in Modesto, California. PepsiCo accelerates efforts to build a more resilient and sustainable food system, reducing absolute GHG emissions more than 4 percent by 2030 across entire value chain and pledging to net-zero emissions by 2040. Photo courtesy of PepsiCo Heather Clancy: The goals were finalized alongside the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Did that experience influence the final shape of the climate goals? Was anything adapted or reconsidered because of what was going on? Jim Andrew: Certainly COVID-19 has been a challenge for everyone on multi levels. But what I think it’s done, it’s really shone a light on the need to be even bolder and move even faster. What has it done? It has, I think, sharpened the focus on the need to move urgently. We all saw that the food system is probably more fragile than we thought. We saw that the need for a food system that is sustainable, that is regenerative, that is inclusive, it’s probably bigger than we thought. In that respect, it didn’t influence what we wanted to do, but it probably helped re-emphasize the need to be big and be fast. Clancy: You mentioned a couple of interim goals to the 2040 one. I’m just curious if you have other short-term milestones that we should expect or watch for. What should we watch for? And how will PepsiCo disclose them? Andrew: You should watch for transparency, consistency and regularity in our reporting. We are completely open in that. Any goal we set, believe me, there’s a lot of work behind coming up with those goals. We put as much work into ensuring transparent reporting because it helps us be accountable — both internally and externally, candidly — and also helps us track progress. We’re a company that likes to set a big objective out there and then go get it. One of the big parts of my job is mobilizing the organization. I’ve got history in sustainability, but I’m a business guy. I didn’t major in environmental science. I’m a business guy working to drive in partnership with our CEO, Ramon Laguarta, and the rest of my executive peers to really drive the organization forward. Having clear goals, having really good data integrity, is at the heart of all of our ESG reporting. That’s important because then we know how we’re doing. It also builds trust. That’s something that we take really importantly. So what are you going to see from us? We’re going to report our progress annually in our sustainability report. We have one coming up in a few months and will be happy to talk to you again, when that comes out. Anytime we can provide real-time updates, we will. All of the reporting entities, we’re in alignment with — the Global Reporting Initiative, the CDP, the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures. We just issued our first [TCFD] report. So, we are going to be transparent; you’re going see it on a regular basis. Our objective is set some bold goals, and then go get them and hold ourselves accountable. Clancy: Since you brought it up, how will you engage the PepsiCo organization to deliver, especially when we’re all in this new age of remote work? Andrew: It’s been incredibly exciting to me to see just in four months the level of excitement in our organization. We’re 260,000-odd people around the world, 200-plus countries and territories. We’re a big complex organization, but there’s a level of interest and excitement. People get it. You ask me, how am I going to engage? There’s three things that you’ve got to do. The first is you’ve got to excite people. With PepsiCo, when you announce an ambitious goal, like our climate goal, people get excited and they get energized. Honestly, a lot of our partners — our bottlers, our co-manufacturers, our suppliers — I’ve had a lot of people reach out to me and say, “Hey, this is really exciting. How can we help? We’re in on it.” So the first thing you got to do internally and also externally is excite and a big goal does that. You know, make no small plans? I think that’s one of the real keys to make sustainability work. You got to embed it in the business strategy, the business processes and the actions everybody takes every day. The second is, there is a level of education that’s important. When we talk to people internally about regenerative agriculture, Scope 3 emissions, those are terms that to most people are new. So we need to introduce those terms. We need to educate people on why the goals matter, but most importantly, how are we going to achieve them. Because that’s what it’s all really about, and we’re doing that across the company. Because we’re Scope 3, it’s got to be across your whole supply chain. We’ve rolled out, as part of the climate goal, a really well-done employee training program specific to our employees to help them understand the role of us as a company, and then the role of them as individuals. What can they do to mitigate climate change? And then finally, it’s about engagement, it’s how do we take that excitement, take that education and then really engage people to drive real action. Because ultimately, it’s about action, it’s about results, it’s about moving the needle. And so that’s everything from, how do we give people the tools? How do we put it in their incentives? How do we talk about it on a regular basis? How do we measure it clearly, because what gets measured gets done, all those things. So: Excite, Educate and Engage. Clancy: How will the Sustainable from the Start Program be implemented, and which product divisions will be first to adopt it? Andrew: That’s a great question, because this is one of my real beliefs and one of my real emphases, which is how do you get sustainability not as something that happens “over there,” but that is really part of the day-to-day business, part of the day-to-day work. Because if it’s part of what we do every day, then it happens and that’s how you really drive action. So, we’re looking at where there are business processes where we can embed sustainability. New product development is a great example. Everybody, every part of the company is interested in and cares about what happens in new product development. So we started this program called Sustainable from the Start, and it really puts sustainability at the heart of product design and new product development, because what it does is it encourages, but it also enables product development teams to make environmental impact a part of their decision-making from the very beginning as they think about the whole product life cycle. We’ve rolled out some tools that really help, because you’ve got to make it simple. The less friction that we can introduce, the easier it’s going to be. So we gave people a set of tools, so that they can estimate, for example, the carbon and the water footprint of products and development, and what are the choices that they make early that are going to affect those footprints. And then they can compare that data to some best practice benchmarks that we’ve built in, so they know what good looks like and they can make more informed decisions. Things like recyclability impediments. If people don’t know, they will not be able to make the kind of decisions that they will if they’re informed. That gets back to the education point I was making as well. If they’re informed and they’re energized and they’re motivated, then they’re going to make decisions that will have big impacts as we move through the life cycle. A big focus of the Sustainable from the Start program is reducing GHG emissions, sure, but also things like discouraging the use of non-recyclable packaging, because that’s really important. So we’ve conducted life-cycle analyses, carbon footprints. We’ve done it for about a quarter of all of our brands now, and we’ve got plans to get all of them done. When you’re a company as big as PepsiCo, you’ve got a lot of brands, so it takes a little while to go through. We’ll have more to share on this — again, transparency, openness. But it’s a great business tool that we’re actively embedding, so that people are thinking about this, from the beginning, as a part of their day-to-day jobs. Because I think that’s one of the real keys to make sustainability work. You got to embed it in the business strategy, the business processes and the actions everybody takes every day. A farmer gives her livestock water in Cucungara, Peru. The success of infrastructure projects piloted by PepsiCo and the IDB in these rural communities has attracted additional support from international public sector partners that has been used to fund new infrastructure, including pipe systems and treatment plants. Photo courtesy of PepsiCo Clancy: Can you share more detail about the internal carbon pricing programs? Why are you embracing them now? Did they take effect? When will they take effect? Andrew: That’s another great example of where we’re trying to take environmental sustainability considerations and just put them in the normal flow of business. So, we’re going to have to collaborate and get employees involved, and also partners and suppliers and everything. There’s a couple that we mentioned. One is, how do we eliminate the carbon impact of employee business air travel? A lot of people travel; a lot of people may or may not fully understand what the implications are of that. What we have done is we have said that anytime any employee is going to travel by air for business, we’re going to put a price on that. And then we’re going to take that money, and we’re going to deploy it with a third party into our supply chain. It’s not something that’s out there, it’s put into our supply chain, to fully eliminate the impact of the emissions from that flight. And it’s flight by flight. And it allows every employee, every time they book a flight, to see that their choice has an impact and also that we as a company will do something. Again, it’s about how do you excite people because people get excited about, “Hey, I can do something.” It’s about how you educate them, because it’s right there, it’s going to be in the booking tool. We are programming it, as we speak. Then it’s ultimately about how you engage them, so they go do something. So that’s one. We’re rolling it out now. By the middle of this year, it’ll be up and running, full go. Then we’re also looking at how we build the carbon impact into carrier selection for third-party logistics. We’re working with our procurement team, so that the climate goals are a part of the consideration when they’re choosing carriers. Because what this will do is it will help you enforce, again, climate considerations and business decisions, which will help drive GHG reductions. And then we’re going to learn from these things, and we’re going to look for where can we continue to expand across other business processes, ways to just embed this into the everyday thinking in activities. Clancy: Those are great examples. Thank you for being so specific. Andrew: The carrier selection is being piloted right now. The employee air travel right now, obviously, we’ve got to do a little programming and not a lot of people are flying a whole lot right now. But the carrier selection program is being piloted right now. Clancy: The pandemic has underscored the fragility of the recycling infrastructure around the world, as well as the food system. What new investments is PepsiCo making to improve collection? And what steps are you taking to increase the use of recycled content in your packaging? Andrew: We have a very clear vision, and that’s a world where packaging never becomes waste. That is front and center for everything we do in packaging. There’s really three things that we have to [enforce that policy]. The first is reduce plastic use. The second is improve recycling, and the third is reinvent our packaging. Let me talk about those now and answer your question. To improve recycling, especially as you say, given some of the challenges, this is a systemic change that is necessary and it requires a lot of partnerships across the full value chain. It requires collaboration between the public sector and the private sector. And it really is how do we work together end-to-end for a circular economy for plastics? We set goals, and then we go and we work really hard to go achieve them. But you’ve got to be transparent along the way about what’s working, what’s not. Specifically to your question, in the last three years, we’ve pledged more than $65 million globally for recycling and collection. A little over a year ago we issued our first green bond. It was a $1 billion green bond. We’ve allocated just about half of that, I think it was $447 million, of the proceeds to projects that advance sustainability. Roughly $200 million of that was specifically to procure recycled PET in our North American beverage packaging. You want to talk about creating a market, that’s creating a market. We have brands, whole brands that are [using] 100 percent recycled PET in Europe. We’ve targeted 100 percent recycled PET in nine countries for our lineup of Pepsi-branded beverage bottles by the end of 2022. We’re working to both support the recycling infrastructure in partnership with other people in the supply chain, public entities, competitors, because this is something that we all have to work on. And then we’re also working at driving demand because if we drive demand and make clear what our commitments are, that helps support the investments that people need to make all along the chain. [Editor’s note: PepsiCo brands using 100 percent PET for their packaging include LIFEWTR, Tazo Tea and Naked Juice.] Clancy: The PepsiCo Foundation has invested considerably in cultivating economic growth and opportunities for women and disadvantaged communities around the world. How does the PepsiCo corporate sustainability team collaborate on those projects? How do they shape the execution of your strategy? How are they aligned? Andrew: We work very closely with the foundation. Again, this is a great example of where we work to use the scale and the reach that PepsiCo has to have a positive impact really across communities around the world, where we operate and to really show some leadership in helping to build a food system that’s sustainable, regenerative and inclusive, to your point. So what we’re always trying to do is work on both people and planet. The foundation and the business have very much those objectives. A good example of collaboration — in addition to the climate news we announced — was the announcement where PepsiCo, in particular our Latin American operations, with our CEO there, Paula Santilli, and the PepsiCo Foundation announced that they are expanding the social and environmental impact partnership that we have with the Inter-American Development Bank. We will go another five years through 2026. It’s a nearly $6 million investment. It builds on the heels of what has been a very successful investment in a partnership over the last 14 years. Over the last 14 years, we’ve supported about 19 million people across Latin America and the Caribbean, on five big pillars of things that are really, really important: water access; nutrition; sustainable agriculture; inclusive recycling; and disaster relief programs. There’s a great example of where the business, the foundation and third parties have been able to collaborate in ways that are more powerful. It’s one of those one plus one plus one equals probably seven. A lot of people have had been helped by a partnership that none of the organizations could do by themselves. Clancy: What’s on your mind right now that I haven’t asked about that you feel like we should talk about more? Andrew: This is something I’ve been thinking about a lot. The challenges that the world is facing, when it comes to climate — again, go back to our recent climate announcement, which is top of mind — are challenges where no company, no government, no NGO can do it themselves. The need for collaboration, for partnership, for working together, has never been higher. These are difficult challenges. These are not things that can be solved by any one entity, and they’re not things that are there to be solved overnight. But they are also things that we can’t wait on. The science is clear, the need is clear; the time to act is now. All of us have to find partners to move forward. There’s going to be some mistakes, there’s going be some things that won’t work but together, we have to work together, find those areas of common interest and where we can complement each other, and then move forward with urgency. That’s why we looked and said: “We want big goals, we want goals that will motivate not only ourselves internally, but also other folks externally.” I’ve gotten a lot of calls from people saying, “Hey, great, how do we team up? I see you’re interested in this; how can we work together on that?” That’s what we need. I wake up every day, I wake up every morning, and I worry about what’s going on and sustainability and how PepsiCo is going to drive forward and meet our goals and move the needle on things. But I also think about, how can we do that with others? So, to me, that’s so important and I’m not sure that is fully appreciated by everybody who needs to work together. Clancy: There is a certain amount of skepticism about some of these big alliances right now. How do you keep them relevant and authentic? Andrew: You have to be open, transparent; you’ve got to build trust; and then you’ve got to show results. I think if those things happen, a lot of problems are going to take care of themselves. Back to the question you asked about milestones, transparency. We don’t set goals that we don’t think we can achieve. We don’t know always how we’re going to achieve them because they are big goals, and they’re bold, and they’re aggressive. But that’s what’s needed. But we don’t set ones just to get a headline or, as much as I love talking to you, we don’t set big goals just to be able to go do interviews. We set goals, and then we go and we work really hard to go achieve them. But you’ve got to be transparent along the way about what’s working, what’s not. How are we doing? Clancy: I just have one last question. What’s your most important priority as a chief sustainability officer at this time? Andrew: Oh, that’s easy. I’ve probably got the best job in the company because I get a combination of the chief sustainability role, and also some business responsibilities, which are all about sustainability. But the most important thing is easy, which is achieving the goals we’ve set. That’s hard to do, but easy to say. But that’s the priority. Ultimately it’s about how do we make the planet better for both the planet and for the people on the planet. How do we drive forward results around climate? How do we reduce emissions? How do we increase our renewable electricity to 100 percent globally? How do we end up at net-zero? That’s what is the most important part of my job. That’s what motivates me, because that’s what ultimately will show up and create real change. I need to work with a whole lot of people internally — 260,000 people have all got to be pulling in that direction. It starts at the top and goes all the way down to our frontline workers, but it also is true externally. But that’s my priority 1, 2, 3, working in every way that I can, with everybody to help us achieve the results that we know are necessary for the planet and the people on it. Pull Quote I’ve got history in sustainability, but I’m a business guy. I think that’s one of the real keys to make sustainability work. You got to embed it in the business strategy, the business processes and the actions everybody takes every day. We set goals, and then we go and we work really hard to go achieve them. But you’ve got to be transparent along the way about what’s working, what’s not. Topics Corporate Strategy Corporate Social Responsibility Net-Zero Carbon Pricing Collective Insight The GreenBiz Interview Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off PepsiCo CSO Jim Andrew

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PepsiCo CSO on embedding sustainability into ‘day-to-day business’

50 countries pledge to conserve 30% of land and water

January 12, 2021 by  
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The High Ambition Coalition (HAC) for Nature and People has made a pledge to protect 30% of the land and water on Earth by 2030 to slow destruction of nature and species extinctions. The pledge was made public last Monday during the One Planet Summit in Paris. HAC is a coalition of more than 50 countries that was formed in 2011 to encourage internal action on the climate crisis prior to the Paris Agreement. The coalition is currently co-chaired by three countries: France, the U.K., and Costa Rica. It was formed in Durban in 2011 and has been at the forefront of encouraging international action on the climate crisis. The coalition is promoting actions against biodiversity loss and hopes that the pledge will lead to a successful conservation agreement during the Cop15 2021 summit in China. Related: Polar bears could go extinct in 80 years if global warming persists In their pledge, the countries have agreed to reserve at least 30% of the planet’s land and water as natural habitats. While making the announcement, HAC noted that protecting 30% of the planet by the turn of the decade is necessary to prevent mass extinction of plant and animal species. On Monday, several world leaders met at the One Planet Summit in Paris to discuss the biodiversity crisis and promotion of archeology as well as to examine the relationship between human health and nature . The event was addressed by various world leaders, including UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres. Besides the pledge to protect 30% of the planet, several countries in the coalition also made pledges to fund nature conservation projects. The coalition has pledged to invest billions of pounds in the  Great Green Wall of Africa  project and the launch of the new  Terra Carta  by Prince Charles. The coalition’s pledges have been applauded but also met by some criticism from various environmentalists. Many emphasized that the commitment needs to be met with actual efforts and delivery. Greenpeace U.K.’s head of politics Rebecca Newsom explained that there are also concerns about the source of funds being pledged by countries such as the U.K. Newsom argued that the funds should not be cut from budgets already allocated for other environmental projects. “Increasing funds to protect and enhance nature is critical to help secure success at the global biodiversity conference in China this year,” Newsom said. “Siphoning off cash from funds already committed to tackling the climate crisis simply isn’t enough.” Via The Guardian Image via Pauline Bernfeld

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50 countries pledge to conserve 30% of land and water

Plant-Based Soups — Super for You & the Planet

January 5, 2021 by  
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Warm, rich, and hearty. Light and refreshing. Spicy and silken. The … The post Plant-Based Soups — Super for You & the Planet appeared first on Earth 911.

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Plant-Based Soups — Super for You & the Planet

This plastic-free, organic personal care kit is ‘All Good’

December 25, 2020 by  
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When they say it’s All Good, this ethical body care company means it’s good for you and the planet. In addition to the company’s notable organic products previously highlighted in a variety of publications, All Good has now taken the extra step to remove all plastic from the products and shipping packaging in its newest two releases. All Good began in 2006 with the mission to do good. Since its inception, the company has become a member of 1% for the Planet, the J.E.D.I Collaborative and many other industry partnerships for environmental and social justice. Plus, All Good has earned the coveted B-Corp Certification. Related: How your beauty routine might be killing sharks All Good’s newest products Recently, All Good unveiled the Plastic Free Body Care Set, a set of organic body care products packaged with zero waste . It features All Good Goop Skin Relief Balm, reef-friendly SPF 50 Tinted Mineral Sunscreen Butter, nourishing Coconut Hand & Body Lotion and a hydrating Coconut Lip Balm. Each item is housed in glass, paper or metal containers and presented in an unbleached canvas travel pouch, making everything reusable, recyclable and biodegradable. While the switch to sustainable outer packaging is a direct response to requests from consumers, the company’s product ingredients are plant-based and organically grown, some harvested from All Good’s own farm. The brand’s commitment to staying away from harmful ingredients means no oxybenzone, gluten, phthalates or parabens. Ingredients grown on the company’s farm rely on regenerative agricultural practices in alignment with sustainable practices. Many products are made in a solar-powered community kitchen. A second product release, called the Get Glowing Lip and Cheek Tint collection, is equally botanically and organically formulated with a focus on ingredients like shea butter and avocado oil, as well as calendula harvested from the same organic farm near Morro Bay, California. The kit includes four colors of blush: rosy beige, coral golden pink, jam berry and shimmer to match any mood. They are packaged in recyclable glass jars. Each of these products is reef-friendly and provides broad spectrum SPF 15 protection. Is All Good really all good? All Good offered to send me a sample kit for review and promptly shipped the Plastic Free Body Care Set. I should start by saying I’m not much of a skincare aficionado and would go so far as to say that my lack of a skincare routine makes my skin health-conscious daughter cringe. However, I am dedicated to sun protection in the form of sunscreen and lip care, so I was excited to dig into my kit. The packaging the kit was sent in was minimalistic , plastic-free and recyclable as expected. The canvas bag is really cute in a very natural way. The statement is clear with the plain earthy colors, and the adorable little turtle is a nice touch and personal favorite of mine. I first grabbed for the Goop Skin Relief Balm. This was my favorite product for a very simple reason — I love the scent. Made with organic herbs and olive oil, I wouldn’t really call it scented. It just smells nourishing, and it is. Since I had just spent the weekend hauling wood for my home’s fireplaces, I had plenty of battle wounds to nurture. The compound is buttery without being greasy. It made my rough knuckles and scraped arms soft and a bit shimmery. Even though I liked the aroma, it was a bit strong for me. However, I’d put myself in the category of extremely scent-sensitive, so the power of the product’s scent might not be a problem for everyone. Next, I reached for the Coconut Body Lotion. I found the consistency luxurious. Although it’s made with cocoa butter and rosehip oil, it doesn’t leave an oily residue. My dry skin (remember aforementioned fireplaces) drank it in willingly, and the results were immediate. The hand and body lotion is high-quality. A little goes a long way, and a single application left my hands feeling soft and looking supple for hours — even with all the handwashing. Unfortunately the coconut smell was a little strong for me, although I imagine most people would find it to be subtle. If you like coconut, you would probably describe it as pleasant. My daughter immediately rehomed it as a favor to my senses, or so she says. I moved on to the reef-friendly, SPF 50 Tinted Mineral Sunscreen Butter. While the lotion and Goop came in glass jars, the sunscreen is housed in a tin. It’s recently been 36°F and cloudy, so I wasn’t able to test it at the beach; All Good reports it is water-resistant for up to 80 minutes. The tint looks dark but was subtle when applied to my off-season pale skin. It is a butter, so it has a slightly heavy feel. Although I would say it felt a bit greasy, I can see how that is beneficial for the sunscreen protection requirements. Lastly was the Hydrating Coconut Lip Balm. Admittedly, I am obsessed with lip-moisturizing products. What I lack in skincare products, I make up for in readily-available lip balms in every corner of my home and car. This lip balm lives up to the name. It’s hydrating, nourishing and unequivocally coconut. I loved the texture and moisturizing aspects, but, again, the scent was too much for me. My teenage son quickly adopted it and reports he loves the way it smells and feels on his lips. The packaging is unique to any roll-up lip balm I’ve used, and I deeply appreciate the design away from plastic. In addition to the products, the kit came with a nice message from the company, printed on a seed paper you can plant and watch grow into wildflowers. I thought this was a lovely touch and dynamic way to show the All Good commitment to a sustainable business model. + All Good Images via All Good and Dawn Hammon / Inhabitat Editor’s Note: This product review is not sponsored by All Good. All opinions on the products and company are the author’s own.

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This plastic-free, organic personal care kit is ‘All Good’

Nimble makes phone accessories from recycled plastic, CDs and more

December 8, 2020 by  
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Technological innovation is here to stay. With it comes the struggle to control e-waste and its assault on the environment. So the three co-founders of Nimble for Good, PBC have combined their extensive experience in the tech, marketing and design development industries to launch a brand of personal tech products committed to ethical and sustainable material sourcing, manufacturing and post-consumer disposal. How it all started The concept is simple, really — develop and use products made from recycled materials to divert waste from the landfill , be transparent as a business and give customers an easy way to support those efforts with eco-friendly products they use every day. Related: Pela offers biodegradable phone cases and other zero-waste products With a strong background in the industry and a quick $2.5 million from investors as a startup just two years ago, Nimble wasted no time jumping into the tech market with the Bottle Case — a cell phone case made out of 100% recycled plastic bottles . With the sale of each case, the company donated “5% to those working to protect the planet’s oceans and marine life.” In alignment with the company’s mission to reduce pollution through material collection and post-consumer recycling, the Bottle Case was a stand-out release that set the stage for a variety of other products. CEO Ross Howe summarized the vision by saying, “Our oceans are drowning in plastic. We’re not interested in creating new plastic to make phone cases. Virtually all phone cases made today require production of virgin materials, while there’s an overwhelming abundance of plastic material already in the ecosystem. We want to keep existing plastic in the economy and out of our oceans and landfills.” Nimble’s phone accessories The newest product from the team, supervised by co-founders Howe, Kevin Malinowski, head of marketing, and John Bradley, head of creative, is simply named the Disc Case. This is the first protective case for iPhones that is made from 100% recycled compact discs . The process involves collecting the CDs, cleaning them and using the polycarbonate components for the phone cases. Using recycled materials eliminates the need for virgin plastics, but the phone cases are also recyclable when they are no longer usable. “Think about how many CDs, DVDs, and software discs are no longer being used,” Howe said. “Facing obsolescence, most go to landfills or incineration, creating a massive stream of toxic waste and pollution . We’re continuing to demonstrate how recycled materials in new products are essential to achieve a more sustainable future.” Nimble also manufactures portable chargers with an interior composed of hard, plant-based plastics made from materials like corn and sugarcane. The devices also incorporate recycled aluminum and the natural mineral crystal, mica, which provides the non-slip exterior. Other similarly earth-conscious products include wireless chargers and fast-charge kits. All products come with a biodegradable bag and prepaid mail-in label that makes it easy to participate in the company’s e-waste recycling program, One-for-One Tech Recovery Project. All devices, phone cases, cables and cell phones are shipped directly to an e-waste recycling partner for proper disassembly and recycling. According to the company website, “Since Aug 2018, we’ve collected over 3,000 lbs. of e-waste, phone cases and compact discs from our customers for proper reclamation by Homeboy Electronics Recycling and other partners.” Sustainable shipping, packaging and partnerships The team is equally focused on minimizing Nimble’s impact from shipping and manufacturing as they continue to explore material options such as recycled plastic, organic hemp , recycled aluminum, bioplastic and more. Each product is shipped using 100% plastic-free options, like recycled scrap paper, and leaves out harmful inks or dyes. Every shipping package is fully recyclable and biodegradable. Not everything in business can be controlled in-house, so when Nimble relies on suppliers, they must agree to conform to the Supplier Code of Conduct. This means all suppliers are evaluated and verified in order to ensure that they share Nimble’s values regarding workers’ rights, sustainable materials and minimal environmental impact. In further highlighting its dedication to corporate responsibility , Nimble is one of around 3,600 Certified B Corporations in the world, meaning it meets the highest standards of human and environmental considerations. In addition, Nimble is dedicated to donating at least 1% of annual sales to environmental nonprofit organizations as a member of 1% for the Planet. Nimble has also partnered with Verizon Wireless as part of the telecommunication company’s initiative to offer more eco-friendly options to its customers. + Nimble Images via Nimble

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Nimble makes phone accessories from recycled plastic, CDs and more

How alt-protein companies Impossible Foods, Memphis Meats hope to reshape diets

November 9, 2020 by  
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How alt-protein companies Impossible Foods, Memphis Meats hope to reshape diets Holly Secon Mon, 11/09/2020 – 01:00 By 2050, nearly 10 billion people will be on the planet. That’s about 2 billion more hungry mouths to feed. Figuring out the best way to feed everyone so they receive enough nutritious food, while using the planet’s finite resources sustainably, is a growing challenge. Typically, as people’s incomes rise throughout the developing world, they consume more resource-intensive animal-based protein, as opposed to unrefined grains, nuts, fruits and vegetables. An alternative to that consumption could exist. Alternative proteins, that is. Alternative proteins, which have gained more mainstream attention in U.S. supermarkets and direct-to-consumer models during the COVID-19 pandemic, include both plant-based or food-technology (so-called “clean meat”) alternatives to animal protein. The alternatives replicate the look, mouthfeel and taste of meat, but have a lower sustainability impact, advocates claim.  At GreenBiz Group’s virtual clean economy conference VERGE 20 late last month, representatives from two of the biggest alternative protein companies, plant-based Impossible Foods and cell-based Memphis Meats, discussed the ways in which alternative proteins could do just that. From providing a buffer for supply chain shocks and price volatility that hit early during the pandemic while making sure consumers eat nutritious food, alternative proteins could make an impact.  Alternative proteins could provide a buffer for supply chain shocks and price volatility that hit early during the pandemic while serving consumers nutritious food. Each company has its own theory of change for full-scale market transformation. Impossible Foods CEO Patrick Brown is on the record saying that by 2035, he wants to eliminate the need for animal farming in and of itself. Meanwhile, Steve Myrick, vice president of operations at Memphis Meats, who spoke at VERGE 20, wants to “augment, not disrupt” the mix of food production methods in the next five to 10 years. Impossible Burger wants to eliminate the need for animal agriculture Impossible Foods has been one of the most hyped-up alternative protein companies, and one of the most successful. Impossible makes a plant-based burger designed to maintain a realistic taste and mouthfeel to beef, primarily using a soy-based version of the protein found in meat called “heme” plus oils and other ingredients. The company also offers plant-based pork and sausages. The products are sold in higher-end restaurants around the world, and recently entered grocery stores as well. Rebekah Moses, head of impact strategy at Impossible Foods, said during VERGE 20 that the key to Impossible Foods’ goal of replacing animal agriculture is “exponential growth.” “What we’re trying to do here even at our relatively small scale is figure out how to tap into consumer behavior without asking consumers to change,” she explained. What we’re trying figure out is how to tap into consumer behavior without asking consumers to change. “So knowing that livestock product consumption is driving climate change by occupying huge amounts of land that would otherwise be capturing carbon … we need to address the system,” she said. “It can’t scale anymore. It’s already scaled to a point where we’re seeing huge problems for climate change and ecosystem services reductions.” Moses believes that Impossible Foods can still scale, and that it can take away market share from traditional animal agriculture to alleviate these issues. “It’s a lofty goal, but it’s exponential scaling,” she said. “We want to double or triple in size every year … The inherent economies of scale of plant-based meat are vastly superior to that of the livestock system — an incredibly environmentally destructive technology because of the amount of inputs required to sustain it.” At scale, Impossible is able to use 96 percent less land, emit 89 percent fewer greenhouse gases and use 87 percent less water, Moses claimed. “It’s just a question of efficiency and how you’re using resources and frankly, animal metabolisms are not going to work for a population of 10 billion people,” she added. It’s just a question of efficiency and how you’re using resources and frankly, animal metabolisms are not going to work for a population of 10 billion people. In addition, she pointed out that Impossible burgers can have slightly different ingredient compositions, making the product resilient to certain commodity shortages and logistical shipping backups. “Plant-based beef can be far more agile because we don’t really have to use the same ingredients all the time,” she said. “So now we use what we have, but there’s nothing saying we can’t use tahil or fava beans or any of a rich array of inputs that are out there. “You have to have binding proteins, you have to have high quality bulk to provide this chew-down, you have to have oils to provide this fat source, but ultimately you can get that from any number of different ingredients. Globally there’s such a diverse array of crop production that is going to provide things like proteins, fats and oils that what the Impossible burger is made of in the United States might be completely different than what it’s manufactured in other parts of the world with other supply chains, especially small local supply chains.” Memphis Meats wants to be a part of the large ‘food production’ tent Memphis Meats is at an even earlier stage of scaling than Impossible Foods, but the company also has generated a good amount of buzz. The company is piloting a new process of producing animal meat, without the animal. In a lab, scientists select specific types of animal cells that could become meat and put them in a cultivating tank, where they undergo a process similar to fermentation to grow muscle and tissue. The company hasn’t reached commercial scale yet, but has received cash infusions from investors including Bill Gates and Richard Branson, as well as industry giants such as Tyson Foods and Cargill. Myrick explained Memphis Meats’ value proposition: “The food system is almost more vast than any of us can really grasp … the world consumes hundreds of billions of pounds of meat and seafood a year. So five to 10 years from now, we think of it as augment, not disrupt. “We’ll still need a lot of different food production methods to keep feeding 8 billion people in that timeline. You can’t do it without large-scale intensive animal agriculture, small-scale subsistence farming, animal husbandry — we think cell-based meat will be a part of that picture, very quickly a bigger part. But I think what it means for us is that we have this philosophy of a big tent. We want to partner with existing industry, coexist, respect consumer traditions.”  Myrick sees the potential to increase the nutrition profile of cell-based meats through chemistry. For now, the company is working on making the product the best it can be, while also considering how to scale to be a meaningful part of food production, according to Myrick. The question for the future is whether Memphis Meats wants to do manufacturing in-house and begin building out that capacity or find a manufacturing partner. “We feel really confident in our path, both to reduce the complexity and the cost of our inputs and also to build out our production system that’s at a scale where the cost makes sense to measure for unit economics that consumers will get,” he said. Once the product is established, in the future, Myrick sees the potential to increase the nutrition profile of cell-based meats through chemistry. “It’s very much a goal to have our product have the identity of conventional meat products,” he said. “It’s very important from a chemistry point of view, from a nutritional point of view, to be within the frame of reference. We think of that as step one, to exceed the expectations of meat-eaters based on their current expectations. But we’re very excited about the next chapter to ideally start to adapt the nutrition profile and hopefully bring products to the consumers that have significant nutritional benefits over that.” Pull Quote Alternative proteins could provide a buffer for supply chain shocks and price volatility that hit early during the pandemic while serving consumers nutritious food. It’s just a question of efficiency and how you’re using resources and frankly, animal metabolisms are not going to work for a population of 10 billion people. Myrick sees the potential to increase the nutrition profile of cell-based meats through chemistry. What we’re trying figure out is how to tap into consumer behavior without asking consumers to change. Topics Food & Agriculture Food Systems VERGE 20 Alternative Protein Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off A plant-based Impossible Whopper from Burger King. Flickr Tony Webster Close Authorship

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How alt-protein companies Impossible Foods, Memphis Meats hope to reshape diets

Chipotle reveals your Real Foodprint

November 2, 2020 by  
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For anyone who’s ever put a muffin back after seeing a posted calorie count in a restaurant, Chipotle’s new app helps further refine choices about what’s worth putting into your body. Real Foodprint tracks the environmental impact of adding a scoop of guacamole to your burrito bowl or saying no to the chicken. The new app assesses the impact along the lines of five metrics: savings in carbon emissions , measured in grams; water saved in gallons; soil health improvement in square feet; organic land supported in square feet; and milligrams of antibiotics avoided. Related: Chipotle debuts surprising new venture: sustainable clothing Independent research company HowGood is responsible for the data. HowGood drew on 450+ studies to compare conventional ingredients to the food available at Chipotle. This is the first time HowGood has partnered with a restaurant to provide the environmental tracking service. “Beyond asking people to make the right choice for the climate based on a carbon label, we are demonstrating the impact of our sourcing practices through data computed based on the ingredients in our guests’ orders,” said Caitlin Leibert, Chipotle’s head of sustainability, in a press release. “While our guests can make good choices for the planet by simply eating at Chipotle, the radical transparency provided by Real Foodprint also holds us accountable to improve our practices and source more sustainably over time. It is the combination of transparency for our guests and Chipotle’s commitment to higher standards that make Real Foodprint so impactful.” This is part of a trend among restaurants to provide customers with more environmental information. Panera recently started marking “Cool Food Meals” on menus, indicating choices with lower carbon footprints. Some parts of the app can be a little misleading. If you’re just going for a high score, you might choose Chipotle’s steak, which saves 150 milligrams of antibiotics compared to conventional meat. However, if you choose tofu — which doesn’t require antibiotics, conventional or otherwise — you won’t get those points. So customers still need to think a bit beyond the app about what’s really best for the health of their bodies and the planet. + Chipotle Via EcoWatch Images via Chipotle

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