Incredible video of Mars stitched together by hand from 33,000 images

March 23, 2017 by  
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If you’ve ever wanted to get up-close and personal with Mars , check out this incredible video recently released by NASA that shows the Red Planet’s surface in stunning detail. Entitled “A Fictive Flight Above Real Mars,” the video is a composite made from about 33,000 of the 50,000 high-resolution stereo images of the planet’s terrain made over the past 12 years by the powerful camera used in NASA’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE). These stereogram images depict the planet’s surface in incredible detail, which can only truly be appreciated in still images by using 3D glasses—or when merged together into an active, three dimensional, fly-over view, as was done by Finnish filmmaker Jan Fröjdman when creating this video. As Wired notes, Mars’ dusty atmosphere obfuscates its surface with massive storms so regularly that the only way to get a decent look at the planet is through imaging technology. So that’s what NASA did. “The best way to see the planet’s surface would be to take a digital image and enhance it on your computer, said planetary geologist and principal investigator for HiRISE, Alfred McEwen. Related: The UAE joins the race to build first city on Mars https://vimeo.com/207076450 Enter Fröjdman, who assembled the flyover shots piece by piece and colorized the monochrome images captured by the HiRISE camera. He was also responsible for identifying features like craters, canyons and mountains, then matching them between pairs of images. The 3D panning effect was the result of a painstaking process that involved stitching the images along reference points and then rendering them as frames in a video. Fröjdman spent three months working on the project, during which time he picked and stitched by hand more than 33,000 images. The result of his work is worth the effort—a truly stunning video. Via Wired Video and image via Jan Fröjdman , Vimeo

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Incredible video of Mars stitched together by hand from 33,000 images

"Piggy Bank," a turtle that swallowed 915 coins, has died

March 23, 2017 by  
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A venerated sea turtle who was fed hundreds of coins by supplicants seeking good fortune is dead . The 25-year-old animal was living in a pond in a town near the Gulf of Thailand in late February when rescuers found her close to drowning from the weight of her cache—about 11 pounds worth. After naming her Omsin, which is Thai for “piggy bank,” a team of veterinary surgeons operated on the turtle for seven hours. By the time they were finished, they had filled a bucket with 915 coins, in currencies both foreign and domestic. Omsin was expected to survive, if not thrive. By all accounts, her rehabilitation at Bangkok’s Veterinary Medical Aquatic Animals Research Center went smoothly. She received laser therapy on her belly incision. A large kiddie pool, coupled with physical therapy for a wonky flipper, helped her ease back into water. Following a liquid diet, Omsin returned to eating solid food. “She is getting stronger,” Nantarika Chansue, a veterinary scientist who tracked Omsin’s progress on Facebook, wrote on March 9. Just as her doctors began planning her release to the wild, Omsin’s condition suddenly deteriorated. They found her intestines in a tangle in the space where the coins once filled. An infection had developed, causing her abdomen to swell up with gas and fluid. Related: Sea turtle is rescued after being dragged onto a beach and beaten for selfies Despite rushing the turtle into intensive care on Sunday night, then emergency surgery on Monday, Omsin lapsed into a comma. On Tuesday, she died, a victim of ignorance and superstition. “At 10:10 a.m., she went with peace,” Nantarika said during a news conference. Visibly weeping, she called Omsin her “friend, teacher and patient.” Nantarika was comforted by just one thought. “She at least had the chance to swim freely and eat happily before she passed,” she said. Via the Washington Post Photos by Unsplash

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"Piggy Bank," a turtle that swallowed 915 coins, has died

Top 6 Ecotourism Destinations for 2017

December 28, 2016 by  
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Love our planet and want the chance to see all it has to offer without making a negative impact? There are ways to travel responsibly, and there are some spots that are changing so quickly that going now is imperative. For a little travel…

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Top 6 Ecotourism Destinations for 2017

You’ll never guess how CO2 can save us

December 13, 2016 by  
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Carbon dioxide is a waste product that is heating up our planet — but it also may be an unexpected solution to climate change.

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You’ll never guess how CO2 can save us

Patagonia made $10 million for charity on Black Friday

December 3, 2016 by  
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In a single day, outdoor retailer Patagonia raised 10 million bucks for the environment. All of the sales from Black Friday are going to grassroots organizations working to protect the planet. Think of it as a fundraiser for the Earth that shattered previous records.

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Patagonia made $10 million for charity on Black Friday

There may be water far deeper in our planet than previously thought

November 23, 2016 by  
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Researchers are surprised to learn that there may be water deeper within the Earth than previously thought. Two scientists from The University of Edinburgh and Florida State University (FSU) discovered a high-pressure phase of a mineral that may be able to store water 400 to 600 kilometers, or almost 250 miles to 372 miles, down in Earth’s mantle. Researcher Mainak Mookherjee said the find “opens up a Pandora’s Box for us.” The mineral, brucite, was not thought to be stable so far down in the Earth. But the discovery of what FSU describes as a high-pressure polymorph of brucite has exciting implications for our knowledge of Earth’s interior. Mookherjee said, “We didn’t think water could be stored by hydrous minerals such as brucite. But now that we know it’s there, we need to figure out how much water could be effectively stored inside it…It really is remarkable that such a well-studied mineral as brucite has something so surprising to offer.” Related: Everything we know about the Earth’s mantle is completely wrong Scientists used to think brucite would decompose in deep Earth, and volcanic activity would send the water it once held up to the planet’s surface. But a high-pressure phase of the mineral might not decompose, so brucite may be able to hold water deep down there after all. Mookherjee said what he describes as deep Earth water is just as important as water on Earth’s surface for the planet’s processes. He said, “If the planet becomes dry on the inside, the planet dies because geodynamic activity within the planet ceases.” The scientists will continue to research brucite and will conduct more simulations to determine how its physical properties differ so deep in the Earth. Mookherjee’s ultimate goal is to figure out just how much deep Earth water there is. The journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences recently published the study online. Via Phys.org Images via Florida State University and Wikimedia Commons

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There may be water far deeper in our planet than previously thought

DIY: Turn a Produce Net into a Dish Scrubber

November 14, 2016 by  
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Few things delight me more than a good upcycle. Why? Upcycled crafts not only feed my creative soul, but they also help us care for the planet by preventing waste. This simple kitchen upcyle is a two-for-one way to be green. You’ll save a…

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DIY: Turn a Produce Net into a Dish Scrubber

Can digital ecosystems save species from extinction?

November 3, 2016 by  
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It’s a fact: Homo sapiens are wiping out the rest of the planet’s species. How can the surge of digital technology be harnessed to protect biodiversity?

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Can digital ecosystems save species from extinction?

General Mills, NRG and P&G shoot for 2 degrees

November 3, 2016 by  
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Over 170 companies have signed onto the Science Based Targets Initiative and have set emissions reduction targets that are in line with climate science’s mandated limit.

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General Mills, NRG and P&G shoot for 2 degrees

Tetris developer designs 8.4 kWh home battery with more energy storage than Tesla’s Powerwall

September 13, 2016 by  
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One of the co-founders of The Tetris Company, Henk Rogers has launched a new battery that stores more solar energy than Tesla’s Powerwall . After reading about the destruction of coral , Rogers, who helped turn Tetris into a worldwide phenomenon, started Blue Planet Energy to help end dependency on fossil fuels . The company’s Blue Ion Continuum battery produces more energy than the Powerwall, and it is reportedly made of sturdier stuff. A heart attack changed the focus of Rogers’ life. A successful video game entrepreneur, he read about the devastating effects of carbon dioxide-fueled ocean acidification on coral while recovering in the hospital. The article inspired his mission ” to end the use of carbon-based fuel .” Frustrated by the government’s slow movement on the issue, he realized better energy storage could help things along. He said, “Wind and solar have become commodities, they’re so cheap, and yet battery is still a luxury.” Related: New plug-and-play home battery system saves money by avoiding high energy rates The eight kilowatt-hour Blue Ion Continuum battery is a potential game-changer. Not only does it allow for more energy storage than the 6.4 kilowatt-hour Powerwall, it’s made of better materials, according to Rogers. Blue Ion Continuum batteries run on Sony’s lithium ferrous phosphate batteries. The Powerwall runs on lithium cobalt manganese batteries. According to Rogers, phosphate and iron are “cheap and benign” while cobalt and manganese are “expensive and dangerous.” Blue Ion Continuum’s warranty is better too. After 15 years, the warranty says the Blue Ion Continuum will still have 75 percent capacity. The Powerwall warranty is 10 years. The Blue Ion Continuum is more expensive than the Powerwall – it will run homeowners $12,950, not including installation – but because the battery’s warranty is longer, Blue Energy Planet says overall ” lifecycle costs ” for their battery will end up being less than the Powerwall. The eight kilowatt-hour battery will provide storage for a three-person family, but families can purchase more units that fit together almost like Tetris blocks from Blue Planet Energy. Their Power Up unit offers 12 kilowatt-hours, and their Power All unit offers 24 kilowatt-hours. The units stack together to easily provide more power. Homeowners can preorder the Blue Ion Continuum now, and should receive the battery in early 2017. Via Greentech Media Images via Blue Planet Energy Facebook

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Tetris developer designs 8.4 kWh home battery with more energy storage than Tesla’s Powerwall

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