New discovery suggests humans are 100,000 years older than previously thought

June 8, 2017 by  
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The surprising discovery of fossilized remains of five early humans in Jebel Irhoud, Morocco has led archeologists to believe that Homo sapiens originated 100,000 years earlier than previously thought. What’s more, the remains — which are estimated to be 300,000 years old — are resettling all former notions of how and where modern humans evolved. Dissatisfied by previous archeological findings in Morocco in the 1960’s, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the National Institute for Archeology and Heritage in Morocco renewed the dig site. The excavation resulted in the discovery of partial skeletal remains of five people — three adults, one adolescent, and one child. Stone tools, animal bones and signs of fire use were also found. The researchers then used thermoluminescence to date the objects, which is how they learned that the objects are between 300,000 and 350,000 years old. Until this discovery, the oldest known samples of H. sapiens were discovered in Ethiopia and dated back 150,000 to 200,000 years. Because there was a lack of evidence showing Neanderthals and “archaic” Homo Sapiens (humans that pre-date H. sapiens) diverged from a common ancestor, scientists figured H. sapiens emerged rather suddenly. The remains that were found, however, now point to the possibility of an early version of H. sapiens who originated in northwest Africa approximately 300,000 years ago. This challenges the “rapid emergence” theory, which is why this discovery is so spectacular. Related: Archaeologists uncover 3,400-year-old Egyptian necropolis Archeologists now assume that after diverging from a common ancestor, a group of archaic H. sapiens spread across Africa , gradually acquiring traits that would come to characterize modern-day humans. These conclusions appear in two separate studies which were published today in the science journal Nature . Scientists describe the fossils and artifacts found at the site in the first paper and analyze and date the stone tools in the second paper . As Gizmodo reports , many groups of humans existed around the same time but it was Homo sapiens who eventually prevailed and spread out across northern Africa between 60,000 to 70,000 years ago. They then continued to migrate into Asia, Australia and North and South America . Though there is still much to discover about where humans originate, a big piece of the puzzle has been solved which will undoubtedly help archeologists learn more in the future. + Nature Via Gizmodo Images via Max Planck Gesellschaft

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New discovery suggests humans are 100,000 years older than previously thought

LEGO celebrates Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th birthday with Guggenheim Museum kit

June 8, 2017 by  
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Visionary architect, Frank Lloyd Wright – who was born on June 8th, 1867 – designed and built over 500 buildings over the course of his lifetime. To celebrate the beloved architect’s 150th birthday, LEGO is releasing 740-piece lego set that lets architecture lovers recreate one of Wright’s most iconic works – NYC’s Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. The custom lego set is highly detailed, recreating the museum’s beautiful modernist curvaceous facade and even has the building’s eight-story annex tower sitting adjacent to a stretch of NYC’s 5th Avenue Museum Mile, complete with tiny yellow cabs. The kit even includes a scaled replica of the Guggenheim sign, which features Wright’s own architectural lettering. Related: LEGO Announces Model of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House “This accurately detailed Lego model faithfully recreates the curves and distinctive lines that have made this building an architectural icon for the last half-century,” said LEGO. Although the Guggenheim set is a celebration of one of the architect’s most iconic building, it’s not the first time that LEGO has shown the architect some love. Six years ago, the company released a 2,276-piece version of his beautiful Robie House . This isn’t the first time LEGO has released the Guggenheim museum, either, but the previous set was much smaller and less detailed than this newest set. The Guggenheim Museum will also be celebrating the architect with architecture-themed tours and various activities throughout the month of June. + LEGO Via Dezeen Images via LEGO and Wikimedia Commons

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LEGO celebrates Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th birthday with Guggenheim Museum kit

1000-Foot-Tall Tower in the Amazon Will Monitor Climate Change From High in the Sky

September 16, 2014 by  
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If you think trees in the rainforest are pretty tall, a new tower being built in the Amazon to monitor climate change will make them look tiny. The Amazon Tall Tower is a joint effort between Brazil and Germany to determine just how much carbon dioxide actually passes through the greenery of the Amazon Rainforest – a vast carbon sink and vastly important place at the heart of climate change on Earth. According to Gizmodo , the tower will be about 1,000 feet high – which is higher than the Eiffel Tower – and it will help scientists measure how much CO2 the rainforest absorbs or releases each year. Read the rest of 1000-Foot-Tall Tower in the Amazon Will Monitor Climate Change From High in the Sky Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Amazon , Brazil , carbon , change , climate , dioxide , gasses , germany , global , greenhouse , max , planck , rainforest , tall , tower , warming

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1000-Foot-Tall Tower in the Amazon Will Monitor Climate Change From High in the Sky

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