Minimalist summer retreat in Denmark is like a house within a house

February 6, 2018 by  
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This summer retreat in Denmark may look like a minimalist dream, but there’s a bit of an interesting design twist when you take a closer look. Danish architecture firm CEBRA designed Treldehuset, a timber getaway in Vejle that merges contemporary design with the traditional silhouette of a low gabled roofline. Deep roof overhangs on all side of the home make room for spacious sheltered terraces and give rise to the building’s image as a “double house—a house inside a bigger house,” say the architects, who liken the project to Russian nesting dolls. Set within a beautiful coastal environment with views of the fjord, Treldehuset’s design draws from the surrounding nature and is built to encourage active outdoor living. A restrained materials palette comprising larch cladding outlined by aluminum profiles and dark slate strengthens the building’s clean and simple lines. A sheltered terrace wraps around the inner volume punctuated with large windows and glass doors that slide open for indoor-outdoor living. “The effect of a double house is achieved by placing the thermal envelope beneath and inside a bigger house,” wrote the architects. “In this way, a roofed outdoor area occurs between the thermal envelope, the actual house and the larger shell, which give access to a protected area – a continuation of the interior which allows you, even on rainy summer nights, to eat, grill or maybe clean a newly caught fish. This transitional zone between indoor and outdoor constitutes an interesting space between the characteristic trees with a view of the fjord .” Related: Ancient Bacteria From Norwegian Fjords Could Be Used to Make the Ultimate Sunscreen Larch is used in the interior for continuity and is broken up by whitewashed walls and concrete. The living room, dining area, and kitchen are placed on the west side of the home, where wall-to-wall glazing blur the lines between indoors and out. The private rooms, such as the bathroom and guest room, are located on the east side of the home. + CEBRA Via Dezeen Images via CEBRA by Mikkel Frost

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Minimalist summer retreat in Denmark is like a house within a house

Beautifully renovated Norwegian cottage combines old and new under one pitched roof

December 20, 2017 by  
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This fifty-year-old cottage designed by architect Atle Sørby was renovated entirely by Local craftsmen in Time, Norway. Norwegian design studio bark arkitekter redesigned the home while taking care to balance modern functional requirements with the original architecture. The Selestranda House occupies a relatively flat site surrounded by long sloping fields, dunes and beaches, separated only by narrow roads and old drystone walls . It features a pitched roof with pulled-down gables which the original architect used to reinterpret the traditional housing typology of the region, which is designed to withstand harsh weather conditions . Related: Snøhetta Turns Old Wooden Boathouse into a Sweet Camping Retreat in Norway The renovated cottage comprises two volumes–a new annex that contains a bedroom, a bathroom and a storage room, and the main volume that houses a large common room, a shared kitchen, and eating and living areas. Local craftsmen carried out every part of the renovation process. The roof tiles, created by local brick-factories in Sandnes, were carefully taken down, stored and put up again, one by one. In order to create an open-plan layout, the architects decided to take down the walls and ceiling in the common area. This also provided enough space for a ribbon window that offers panoramic views of the landscape. + bark arkitekter Via Archdaily Photos by Lise Bjelland

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Beautifully renovated Norwegian cottage combines old and new under one pitched roof

Timber-clad stfold cabin embraces the Scandinavian coastline

November 21, 2017 by  
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Natural light and stunning coastal views fill the enviable Østfold cabin, a cedar-clad dwelling in southeastern Norway. Designed by Norwegian studio Lund+Slaatto Architects , the coast-hugging cabin is undoubtedly contemporary yet its pitched roof pays homage to the local traditional architecture and the former building onsite. Surrounded by pines and rocky terrain, the home features light-colored timber inside and out to help it blend into the landscape. The 60-square-meter Østfold cabin comprises two volumes: a main building and an annex connected via outdoor terrace that wraps around the larger structure. Glazed folding doors open up the southwest-facing open-plan living room, dining space, and kitchen to the terrace as well as views of the outdoors. Large windows and other glazed openings let in copious amounts of natural light, while the roof overhang and timber louvers help mitigate solar gain. Related: Meditative lakeside Prism Cabin reveals Bordeaux through stained-glass windows While the open-plan living area and its stunning vistas are the highlights of the home, the interior also steps up to a secondary sitting area, and leads up to a second-floor study tucked within an attic -like space. The annex contains a bedroom. “Inspired by the rocky coastal surroundings, different levels create natural divisions within the open interior space,” wrote the architects. “The timber cladding, alongside the slim pitched roof, gives the house an almost shelter-like appearance – a sensation of a light and sensible dwelling on the fragile coast.” + Lund+Slaatto Architects Via ArchDaily Images via Marte Garmann

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Timber-clad stfold cabin embraces the Scandinavian coastline

Futuristic solar home hidden inside 18th-century stone ruins

October 20, 2017 by  
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The stone ruins of an 18th-century Scottish farmhouse have been brought back to life as the envelope for a surprisingly modern solar-powered home. Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio crafted Ruin Studio with layers like a palimpsest, from the 200-year-old farmhouse frame to futuristic and tubular interior shell. In addition to the use of photovoltaics, the dwelling was built to near passivhaus standards and boasts a super-insulated envelope. This unusual home located in the remote Scottish countryside retains an outwardly rural appearance with a pitched roof and exterior stone walls. Instead of using timber for the pitched envelope, however, the architects clad the structure in black waterproofing EDPM rubber . Stranger still is the pair of interior curved shells, inserted inside the rubber-clad envelope, made of insulating recycled polystyrene blocks and covered with glass-reinforced plastic. These white futuristic “tubes” serve as hallways connecting the centrally located communal areas with the bedrooms located on either end of the home. “Emphasizing the narrative of time, these three layers also reflect different architectural expressions: the random natural erosion of stone walls, an archetypical minimalist pitched roof, and a free form double curved surface,” wrote the architects. “These three layers are not designed as independent parts, rather, they take on meaning as their relationship evolves through the building’s sections. They separate, come together, and intertwine, creating a series of architectural singularities, revealing simultaneous reading of time and space.” Related: Barn ruins transformed into contemporary home with spa Natural light fills the predominately white interior and large windows frame views of the Scottish countryside. The furnishings are kept minimalist and are mostly built from light-colored wood; gridded timber bookshelves located in the tube adhere to the curved walls. Portions of original stone walls are brought into the home. + Nathanael Dorent Architecture Via ArchDaily

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Trees grow on every balcony of this Hanoi university building

October 20, 2017 by  
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This university building in Hanoi weaves Vietnam’s tropical landscape into its checkerboard facade, with trees growing on every balcony. Designed by Vo Trong Nghia Architects , the recently completed FPT University administrative building is the first phase in a greater masterplan to convert the campus into a “globally competition environmentally conscious university.” The university is part of Vietnam’s largest technology park, the Hoa Lac Hi-Tech Park, on the outskirts of Hanoi. Completed early this year, the administrative building serves as a campus gateway and will welcome students, staff, and visitors with its tree -integrated envelope. “The building acts as a gateway to the campus and the green facade clearly dictates the future direction of the campus,” wrote the architects. The nature-infused project is characteristic of the architecture firm’s world-renowned style for bringing plants into buildings. Related: Giant bamboo planters protect a Ho Chi Minh City home from the sun and rain Built of concrete , the asymmetric building is clad in prefabricated facade modules to cut down on waste and construction time. Building orientation and large windows optimize the flow of natural ventilation and daylight into the building, while trees on the balconies minimize solar gain. Accessible green roofs top the structure. + Vo Trong Nghia Architects Via Dezeen Images via Vo Trong Nghia Architects , by Hoang Le

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Trees grow on every balcony of this Hanoi university building

Beautiful sea-facing home uses height to overcome site restrictions

March 29, 2017 by  
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This beautiful Russian home stands out from its neighbors with an unusually steep inclined roof that’s constructed for more than just its looks. Architectural bureau Chvoya designed House in Pribylovo, a contemporary home commissioned by a family who sought views of the Vyborg gulf. Since local regulations restricted construction to a small area in the back of the plot, the architects overcame the restriction by creating a compact, three-story house with a large window near the apex that overlooks the water. Located in Pribylovo village, the modern home retains a rustic vibe with its unpainted timber facade and steeply pitched roof. While the house shares visual similarities with its neighbors, the dwelling is slightly taller than the surrounding buildings and has a distinctly clean and contemporary appearance. Raw pine planks clad the facade and are complemented with black metal used for the folded roof and on the folding screens on the ground floor. Related: Family renovates century-old barn into stunning modern home in Washington state Windows and skylights punctuate all sides of the home to let in daylight however, the greatest concentration of glass is on the north sea-facing facade. A row of full-height glass doors equipped with wooden folding screens run along the ground floor; a small opening offers views for the master bedroom on the second floor; and a large studio window on the third floor provides the best gulf views. The ground floor houses the communal areas, while the second floor contains the four bedrooms and a studio takes over the third and smallest floor. The timber-clad interior features a restrained color palette and IKEA furnishing for a cozy cabin vibe with a contemporary feel. + Chvoya Via ArchDaily

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Beautiful sea-facing home uses height to overcome site restrictions

Origami-like alpine cabin brings contemporary style to Chile’s mountains

March 22, 2017 by  
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Alpine architecture has evolved far beyond traditional chalets, as can be seen in this contemporary cabin perched high above in Chile’s Valparaíso Region. Architect Gonzalo Iturriaga completed the blackened pine cabin, named RF C9, on a rocky site near the commune of San Esteban. Like a piece of origami, the angular refuge has numerous folds, some of which are turned into glazed openings that frame spectacular views of the surrounding mountains. Elevated off the uneven ground, the 60-square-meter RF C9 cabin comprises two bedrooms and a bathroom at one end of the home, while an open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen are located on the other in the larger part of the building. The pine-clad retreat features an asymmetrically pitched roof that evokes the image of a tent evolved into a timber form. The steep angles of the roof shed snow effectively and the retreat is designed to handle the extreme climates. Related: Century-old WWI bunker is reborn as a contemporary alpine shelter “Using a ventilated facade on all sides and a system of piles, the shelter functions as a hermetic element suspended on the ground which, from specific openings, uses the rising current of the mountain to ventilate its interior,” wrote the architect. The interior is clad in untreated pine contrasted with black window frames, blackened pine cabinetry, and a black wood-burning stove . Large windows of varying shapes punctuate the retreat, with the largest panes set on the east façade where they frame stunning views of the mountain enjoyed from the master bedroom and the living area. + Gonzalo Iturriaga Via Dezeen Images via Gonzalo Iturriaga

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Five small buildings and a shared courtyard create a stunning summerhouse in Denmark

January 4, 2017 by  
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This summer house is Denmark, built for a family of five and a dog, is split up into five separate buildings organized around a spacious courtyard . Jarmund/Vigsnæs Arkitekter drew inspiration from traditional farm buildings in order to provide privacy to each of the residents and create a variety of valuable open spaces where the family can come together and enjoy the outdoors. The house is located in a windy village on the northern tip of Sjælland, the largest and most populated island in Denmark . Laid out in a star shape, the five separate houses house different functions-there is a kitchen building, parents building, children’s building, guest building and utility building. Each of the volumes have roofs with different angles, while the ridges and cornices are kept on the same height. Related: Tiny Wedge-Shaped Writer’s Cottage Hangs Off a Hillside in Norway In addition to providing privacy to the occupants, this pavilion-like layout also has a practical purpose–it shields the courtyard from strong winds, thus enabling the family and their guests to spend more time outdoors. The roofs and walls of the buildings are clad with corrugated sheets of aluminium , the gable walls are clad with Siberian Larch, while the inner courtyard features dark stone paving to store heat from the day throughout the evening. + Jarmund/Vigsnæs Arkitekter Via Contemporist Photos by Torben Petersen

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Sophisticated minimalist house in Denmark lets you enjoy the outdoors even in the winter

October 5, 2016 by  
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The house references traditional Scandinavian craftsmanship and the region’s authentic principles of working with relief and texture. Providing a serene environment far from city bustle, the house facilitates a connection between the residents and the surrounding landscape. Related: Beautiful timber home is striking in its rugged Scandinavian simplicity The house comprises two volumes-the left one accommodates the main living room which offers views of the forest, and a combined kitchen and dining space on the first floor. The second floor houses the bedrooms and cabinet. Relaxation zones – sauna, swimming pool and play areas- and utility rooms, bathrooms and a garage are housed in the other volume. A glazed gallery connects the two volumes and functions as a winter garden that acts as a continuation of the landscape. + KAVA Architects Images by iddqd Studio

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A daylit extension with a lush indoor garden "grows" out of an artist’s studio in California

August 15, 2016 by  
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The new 720-square-foot extension adds domestic spaces to the main structure, which houses a 2,500-square-foot artist’s studio, office, and storage building clad in barn wood . Dubbed the “Amoeba”, the structure extends out into the landscape and features elements of greenery that form a lush indoor garden . A large skylight is carved into the scissor-beam roof construction. The roof of the extension contrasts the inverted pitched roof of the studio, although it follows a similar geometric logic. Related: Modern timber-clad addition spruces up an old Austrian farmhouse Sliding doors can be completely opened to let breeze naturally cool the spaces, leading out to the garden where the owners planted a variety of plants, including bamboo , fig trees, creeping vines, and aloes. + Casper Mork-Ulnes Architect Via World Architecture News Photos by Bruce Damonte

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