Banks like ING and DNB are backing away from pipelines

April 3, 2017 by  
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Investor groups are pressuring banks to divest from financing the $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline. Will this be a jumping off point for more financial activism?

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Banks like ING and DNB are backing away from pipelines

Why resilience is essential in a volatile world

April 3, 2017 by  
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Companies and organizations that adopt full-spectrum thinking about a variety of modern risks will thrive in an uncertain future.

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Why resilience is essential in a volatile world

GreenBiz and WBCSD to partner on ’30 Under 30′ recognition

April 3, 2017 by  
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Two groups launch global search for sustainable business’s next-gen leaders.

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GreenBiz and WBCSD to partner on ’30 Under 30′ recognition

Judge throws out request to halt Dakota Access Pipeline construction

February 14, 2017 by  
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a The Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux just suffered a major defeat at the hands of a federal judge — the tribes’ request to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline was rejected Monday afternoon. The tribe’s lawyers filed the motion arguing that Lake Oahe, which the pipeline would cross, contains sacred water which would be desecrated by the pipeline. This argument was dismissed by Energy Transfer Partners , saying that the company had “the utmost respect for the religious beliefs and traditions” of the tribe and that their efforts did not threaten the traditions of the community. The protesters, who fear the consequences of an oil spill near their main source of water, say they aren’t surprised by the ruling. In a report from the Guardian , many reaffirmed their commitment to the cause, with some stating they would continue to occupy the protest camps near the pipeline’s construction sites. Related: Army approves Dakota Access Pipeline route – and construction could begin immediately Religious beliefs and traditions weren’t only issues at stake in this ruling. The pipeline, which was originally halted by the Obama administration in December, was supposed to undergo a lengthy environmental review process before permits would be issued for the company to begin drilling. Instead, Donald Trump used his first weeks in office to throw out the review and simply push the approval process through. Though many indigenous protesters dispersed during the winter to avoid brutal storms, they are beginning to return as the weather improves. They are vowing to continue to fight the pipeline, both on the ground and in court. Via The Guardian Images via Tony Webster and Lars Plougmann

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Judge throws out request to halt Dakota Access Pipeline construction

Army Corps ordered to approve Dakota Access Pipeline

February 1, 2017 by  
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It seems like President Donald Trump is determined to get his way on the Dakota Access Pipeline . Senator John Hoeven and Congressmen Kevin Cramer, both of North Dakota , said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will give the final approval necessary to move forward with the oil pipeline after an order from the acting secretary of the Army. But the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe says the move is illegal, and they’re not backing down without a fight. Hoeven said acting secretary Robert Speer informed Vice President Mike Pence and him of the impending approval. He said in a statement the pipeline would be constructed with safety features to provide protection for the Standing Rock Sioux. Related: 8 ways to help the water protectors at the Standing Rock Reservation But the tribe says there’s an environmental study going on that must be finished before the Army can grant the easement, and they’re planning to resist. In a statement posted on Facebook they said, “We stand ready to fight this battle against corporate interest superseding government procedure and the health and well-being of millions of Americans.” You can make your voice heard as well. The Army is currently gathering information for the environmental impact statement which includes a “public scoping phase.” Members of the public are invited to share their concerns with the Army until February 20, 2017. You can mail your comments to Mr. Gib Owen, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works, 108 Army Pentagon, Washington DC 20310-0108. You can also email Owen at gib.a.owen.civ@mail.mil. The Army requests you include your name, return address, and “NOI Comments, Dakota Access Pipeline” on the first page of your letter, or if you’re sending an email, put “NOI Comments, Dakota Access Pipeline” as your subject. More details can be found here . There are still hundreds of people camping near the proposed pipeline route in North Dakota. Reuters reported at one point there were over 10,000 people in the camp; veterans and activists stood alongside Native Americans. Law enforcement has made over 600 arrests. Indigenous Environmental Network organizer Dallas Goldtooth said on Twitter Cramer was ” trying to incite violence ” by stating the Army gave their approval before it’s official. Via Reuters Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

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Army Corps ordered to approve Dakota Access Pipeline

US Army blocks Dakota Access Pipeline in major victory for protestors

December 5, 2016 by  
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The Dakota Access Pipeline protesters just celebrated a major victory as the Army Corps announced it will deny a permit for a key section of the 1,172 mile Dakota Access Pipeline. The controversial pipeline was supposed to be placed under Lake Oahe and the Missouri River, only half a mile from the Standing Rock Sioux reservation – a move that protesters argued could easily poison the reservation’s water supply if the pipe burst. The Army Corps is now planning to look for an alternate route for the pipeline with a less significant environmental impact. Over the past several months, thousands of protesters gathered to support the Standing Rock tribe in their fight against the pipeline. Today, the self-styled “water protectors” are celebrating their victory – but they also warn that there is still more work to be done. The Army Corps’ decision doesn’t mark an end to the pipeline, simply a change in plans. It’s possible the new proposed route will also be problematic, and there are plenty of environmental activists who don’t consider further construction of the project to be a victory, no matter how it’s routed. Related: The Keystone XL Pipeline could be resurrected under Trump’s administration Tribal leaders have also expressed concern that the victory may be short-lived: Donald Trump’s administration may seek to overturn the decision once he takes office in January. He’s already spoken out in favor of the pipeline after the developers donated over $100,000 to his presidential campaign. This shouldn’t come as a huge surprise—Trump’s also promised to help push through the controversial Keystone XL pipeline , which Obama vetoed a year ago. If Trump does decide to try to override the decision, he’ll have an uphill battle ahead of him. While the Army Corps’ announcement effectively shuts down the final leg of construction on the pipeline , it’s not an outright denial that could be overturned with a simple executive decision. The denial of the permit has set in motion an entire environmental impact assessment, which will likely take some time to complete. Attorneys for environmentalist groups like Earthjustice are already prepared to meet Trump in court should he challenge the decision. Related: American veterans arrive at Standing Rock to defend Dakota Access Pipeline protesters In the meantime, the Standing Rock protesters have issued a statement calling for a permanent stop to the construction, and for criminal charges to be dropped against members of the group who have been arrested for civil disobedience over the past nine months. So far, a staggering 550 protesters have been arrested and charged. Energy Transfer Partners, the developer, intends to continue pushing for a permit to complete construction without rerouting. Via Huffington Post Images via Medea Benjamin and sabreigha

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US Army blocks Dakota Access Pipeline in major victory for protestors

Sign this petition to stop construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline

November 27, 2016 by  
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XL0aq05t7ds The controversial Dakota Access Pipeline is approximately 80 percent built—but it’s not too late to stop it from completion. Standing Rock Youth and their Rezpect our Water campaign have launched a petition to urge the Army Corps of Engineers to halt construction of the pipeline and they need your help! The pipeline, which would run from North Dakota to Illinois, poses huge threats to historic Standing Rock Sioux Tribe sites, their cultural heritage, and the environment. Help Standing Rock Youth by signing their Change.org petition .

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Sign this petition to stop construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline

Endangered orcas under threat from bitumen pipeline planned for Vancouver port

November 17, 2016 by  
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A population of killer whales that live off the coast of Vancouver, Canada is under threat by a planned oil pipeline that could lead to a disruption of their habitat by increased tanker traffic. Texas-based Kinder Morgan is planning to build the $5 billion US Trans Mountain Expansion pipeline project that would transport bitumen from the Alberta Tar Sands directly to the edge of the whales’ habitat in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of southern British Columbia. The Canadian government has already been advised to approve the project, and its fate now lies with the government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. According to the Guardian , the proposal to build the massive pipeline project still needs approval from the Canadian federal government, led by Justin Trudeau. But if approved, it would result in a 1,000 km (620 mile) pipeline from northern Alberta to Vancouver, as well as roughly seven times more barge and tanker traffic. Killer whales , or orcas as they’re also known, have already had a rough existence in recent years. The Guardian notes that in the 1960s and early ‘70s, many of them were captured and sold to aquariums and theme parks, while those remaining in the wild were exposed to runoff chemicals from local industries – causing them to become the “world’s most contaminated marine animals.” Conservationists say that an increase in tanker traffic in their habitat could be disastrous for the genetically unique population of orcas – already classified as endangered in both Canada and the US. “The approval of the project is also the approval of the extinction of the population, Ross Dixon of the Raincoast Conservation Foundation told the Guardian. “No one is disputing it. Nobody is saying that’s not accurate. It’s been accepted.” Related: Donald Trump vows to nix Paris climate deal and pave way for Keystone XL pipeline So, will it be approved? As of May, the Canadian energy regulator finished two years of review that recommended the government approve the project, with 157 conditions attached to that approval, including 49 related to the environment. Yet the review panel noted that, conditions or not, the project is likely to have “significant adverse effects” on the killer whale population. The Canadian government has until December 19 to make a decision, and so far, all signs are pointing to approval. Prime Minister Trudeau faces pressure to approve the pipeline from Alberta, where low oil prices have dramatically increased unemployment. Ironically, promises by President Elect Donald Trump to bring back the Keystone XL Pipeline could kill the Trans Mountain project and save the whales. Via the Guardian Images via Matthew_Allen and Mike Charest,  Flickr Creative Commons

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Endangered orcas under threat from bitumen pipeline planned for Vancouver port

President Obama says Army is exploring rerouting the Dakota Access Pipeline

November 3, 2016 by  
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Will President Barack Obama take action on the Dakota Access Pipeline ? In an interview with NowThis posted this week he said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is exploring “ways to reroute” the oil pipeline protested by Standing Rock Sioux Tribe members and their supporters in North Dakota . President Obama’s statement sounded hopeful but may not result in action soon; the president said he would let the confrontation “play out for several more weeks.” When asked if his administration would intervene in the conflict over the Dakota Access Pipeline, President Obama said, “We’re monitoring this closely and I think as a general rule, my view is that there is a way for us to accommodate sacred lands of Native Americans . I think right now the Army Corps is examining whether there are ways to reroute this pipeline in a way.” Related: In surprise announcement, US government blocks the Dakota Access Pipeline Some people didn’t seem pleased with the president’s comments. In a statement, Morton County Chairman Cody Schulz said, “Rather than creating further uncertainty, the President should be sending us the support and resources necessary to enforce the law and protect people’s right to peacefully protest.” Energy Transfer Partners spokesperson Vicki Granado said they didn’t know of any reroute considerations and they still expected to obtain an easement to start building the pipeline portion that would pass beneath the Missouri River. When asked about treatment of the protesters, President Obama said, “I mean, it’s a challenging situation. I think that my general rule when I talk to governors and state and local officials whenever they’re dealing with protests – including, for example, during the Black Lives Matters protests – is there’s an obligation for protesters to be peaceful and there’s an obligation for authorities to show restraint.” He said he hoped everyone could have the opportunity to be heard with both sides avoiding situations where people could be hurt. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Chairman Dave Archambault II said in a statement, “We believe President Obama and his administration will do the right thing.” You can watch NowThis’s interview with the president here . Via NowThis Twitter and NPR Images via Nick Knupffer on Flickr and Sacred Stone Camp on Facebook

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President Obama says Army is exploring rerouting the Dakota Access Pipeline

Alabama governor declares state of emergency after deadly gas pipeline explosion

November 2, 2016 by  
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Earlier this week near Helena, Alabama there was a fire and explosion at a gasoline pipeline operated by Colonial Pipeline Co . One worker perished in the blast, which injured around five other workers. Yesterday Governor of Alabama Robert Bentley announced a state of emergency  as a result of the explosion. The Colonial Pipeline at 5,500 miles long is the biggest pipeline system carrying refined products like jet fuel, gasoline , and diesel in America, according to Reuters. The pipeline can carry three million gallons of these products between the New York Harbor and the Gulf Coast. The explosion happened when workers hit a line with a track hoe, a type of excavator, and occurred in a wildlife area that is unincorporated. Related: 700 barrels of crude oil spill in California as pipeline breaks This isn’t the first incident Colonial Pipeline has faced; as recently as September a pipeline leak spilled an estimated 252,000 to 336,000 gallons of gasoline. The spill was the largest in almost 20 years, and interrupted pipeline operations for 12 days. In his statement on the October explosion, Governor Bentley said the operation the workers were performing at the time of the explosion “was necessary to install a permanent repair required by the previous pipeline rupture.” The governor announced a state of emergency spanning from November 1 to December 1 ” unless sooner terminated ” in a statement. The declaration will enable the state to receive a U.S. Department of Transportation waiver lifting the government’s “limitation on the hours a driver can transport gasoline.” Fuel companies and shippers are concerned they won’t receive the fuel they need. In the Southeast, millions of Americans may not receive as much gasoline, and the explosion could even affect the Northeast as well. Colonial Pipeline said they might open the pipeline again as soon as Saturday. They may also attempt to send the refined products via other parts of the pipeline. On their website Colonial Pipeline advertises their ” system integrity ” and says “Safety, environmental stewardship, and first-class customer service drive our operating philosophy.” Via Reuters ( 1 , 2 ) Images via screenshot

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Alabama governor declares state of emergency after deadly gas pipeline explosion

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