New material converts sunlight, heat, and movement into electricityat the same time

February 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on New material converts sunlight, heat, and movement into electricityat the same time

Like harnessing the power of the sun or getting a charge from physical movement, the conversion of ambient energy into electricity is getting pretty old hat. Tapping multiple sources simultaneously, on the other hand, is something else altogether. The secret was under our noses this whole time. While minerals known as perovskites have shown promise for extracting one or two types of energy concurrently, one particular member of that family leaves them in the shade by distilling sunlight, heat, and movement into electricity at once. Like all perovskites, KBNNO is ferroelectric in nature. This means it contains tiny electric dipoles, packed with positive charges on one end and negative charges on the other, according to scientists from University of Oulu , who described the material in the journal Applied Physics Letters this week. Changes in temperature coaxes these dipoles to shift, which in turn induces an electric current. Likewise, mechanical stress causes parts of the material to attract or repel charges, producing another current. KBNNO’s photovoltaic and ferroelectric properties have been the subject of prior research, but the Oulu study marks the first time anyone has evaluated properties relating to temperature and pressure. Previous studies also operated at temperatures hundreds of degrees below freezing, rather than above room temperature, as the latest experiments did. Related: Piezoelectric device harvests wasted heat energy from tech Still, there was one wrinkle: Although KBNNO proved “reasonably good” at generating electricity from heat and pressure, scientists didn’t think it quite measured up to its fellow perovskites—at least, not without some tinkering, say by preparing KBNNO with sodium to amplify certain piezoelectric or pyroelectric properties. “It is possible that all these properties can be tuned to a maximum point,” Yang Bai, who led the study, said in a statement. By next year, Bai and his team say they hope to construct a prototype of a multi-energy-harvesting device – one that could render batteries for portable devices obsolete. He said, “This will push the development of the Internet of Things and smart cities, where power-consuming sensors and devices can be energy sustainable”. + American Institute of Physics Via PhysOrg Photos by Arcadiuš and TimOve

More here:
New material converts sunlight, heat, and movement into electricityat the same time

Desert Rain House in Oregon is one of the greenest homes in the world

February 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Desert Rain House in Oregon is one of the greenest homes in the world

There’s a new contender for the world’s greenest home: Desert Rain House in Bend, Oregon . Designed by Tozer Design , the LEED Platinum home recycles all its water, produces more power than it can use, and it is the first residential compound to be certified by the Living Building Challenge . Solar panels and a rainwater collection cistern help this super green home pioneer a new paradigm for sustainable family living. The five-building Desert Rain House boasts seriously environmentally friendly features. Human waste is composted thanks to a central composting system, and greywater is reused for irrigation via a constructed wetland. Natural and local materials comprise the elegant dwellings; reclaimed lumber and plaster made with local clay, sand, and straw are among the sustainable building materials utilized. Related: Kansas University students build net-zero home with LEED Platinum and Passive House certification Materials from old buildings that once occupied the site were repurposed for Desert Rain House, such as old stone salvaged from old foundations and used in concrete for patios. The team that built the home looked for ways to reduce their carbon footprint as much as possible. For example, instead of having a manufacturer ship them roofing panels, the team assembled roofing onsite from a large roll of steel. Red List-compliant sealants and finishes also make for a non-toxic environment. Indoors the air is clear: not only can the owners open large windows for air circulation, but a waste heat-capturing energy recovery ventilator also means fresh air continually wafts through the main residence. Three homes and two out-buildings add up to 4,810 square feet situated on 0.7 acres. Elliott Scott, who owns the home with his wife Barbara, said in a statement, “We can’t continue thinking we are building a better world by making a ‘less bad’ version of the world we have created. The Living Building Challenge forces us to think in terms of a new paradigm.” + Tozer Design + Desert Rain House Via International Living Future Institute and Curbed Images via Desert Rain House Facebook and Desert Rain House

See the original post: 
Desert Rain House in Oregon is one of the greenest homes in the world

California looks to its roads for new source of renewable energy

September 27, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on California looks to its roads for new source of renewable energy

California is putting $2 million into research to determine whether gridlock can be a beneficial source of electricity . The technology at the heart of the idea is piezoelectric crystals, which could turn mechanical energy from traffic into usable electricity that can be added to the power grid. The approach seeks to harness energy that is usually wasted, thus providing an additional source of renewable energy for the state’s residents. The California Energy Commission is looking for a research facility to conduct small-scale tests on harnessing the energy that is currently being lost from vehicles traveling on the state’s roadways. Piezoelectricity uses naturally occurring crystals to capture heat generated from moving vehicles and convert it into electricity for any number of uses. The primary objective of the research will be to determine whether a cost-effective system can be installed to produce a substantial amount of energy. Related: Piezoelectric energy-generating roads proposed for California “It’s not hard to see the opportunity in California,” said Mike Gravely, the commission’s deputy division chief of energy research and development. “It’s an energy that’s created but is just currently lost in vibration.” California currently has a goal of producing 50 percent of its electricity with renewables by 2030, and the energy commission says the state is on target to reach 25 percent by the end of this year. The $2 million research fund for testing new technologies will come from the California Public Utilities Commission, which expects to award a contract in the spring. Via Phys.org Images via Wikipedia and Flickr

View original post here:
California looks to its roads for new source of renewable energy

Margot Krasojevic designs Belgrade trolly system powered by piezoelectricity

July 26, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Margot Krasojevic designs Belgrade trolly system powered by piezoelectricity

The project uses 3d-printed piezoelectric cells applied to each trolley pole, trolley bus elevation, tire and overhead wire. Aluminum consolidated carbon nanotubes , which increase the heat and electrical conductivity of the material embedded within the structure, are combined with the steel frame, concrete-clad helix. The aluminum frames are printed with piezoelectric crystals that generate electricity from the air flow and pressure exerted from the trolleybus and its overhead wire movement. Related: Margot Krasojevic’s solar-powered sand turbine hotel aims to stop the spread of the Gobi Desert Elevated walls further increase the vibration of the trolley-poles, augmented by wind and rain. These vibrations amplify the the piezoelectric cell displacements which, in turn, generate energy. The design will act as an electrical amplifier, and will provide street lighting and WiFi access to immediate neighborhoods. Users will also be able to use the system to power their gadgets and smart cars , while the electric current stimulates root growth in plants. + Margot Krasojevic

See more here: 
Margot Krasojevic designs Belgrade trolly system powered by piezoelectricity

ES Pipe Waterwheel Generates Hydroelectricity Every Time You Turn on the Tap

July 5, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on ES Pipe Waterwheel Generates Hydroelectricity Every Time You Turn on the Tap

Here at Inhabitat we love discovering products that generate power from everyday activities – innovations like piezoelectric energy-generating roads and human-powered clothing have the potential to change the world. That’s why were so intrigued by the ES Pipe Waterwheel – it’s a simple system that allows you to generate energy every time you turn on the tap. The Pipe Waterwheel is designed to be installed inline with existing pipes, and it uses the flow of waste water to turn a set of mini energy-generating turbines. Designed by Korean innovator  Ryan Jongwoo Choi , the ES Pipe Waterwheel is an independent system that contains mini turbines which generate power from flowing water. Every time someone turns on the tap, it creates energy which can then be stored for future use or implemented straight away. It is also easy to use and install. The ES Pipe Waterwheel can be placed along practically any length of water pumping piping. The waterwheel system then generates power every time someone turns on the tap for a drink of water or a shower. The product has been named as a finalist in the 2012 International Design Excellence Awards . Click below to watch the product in action. + Ryan Jongwoo Choi Via Yanko Design

Go here to read the rest:
ES Pipe Waterwheel Generates Hydroelectricity Every Time You Turn on the Tap

New Piezoelectric Railways Harvest Energy From Passing Trains

December 9, 2010 by  
Filed under Eco, Eco Tech, Green

Comments Off on New Piezoelectric Railways Harvest Energy From Passing Trains

Piezoelectric technology generates energy from pressure and stress on certain surfaces, and we’ve seen it harvest electricity from roads and dance floors to power lights and signs. Recently Israeli company Innowattech unveiled a new use for this versatile energy tech – they’re planning to install piezoelectric pads throughout the country’s railways to generate electricity. Read the rest of New Piezoelectric Railways Harvest Energy From Passing Trains http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/ohttp://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/options-general.php?page=better_feedptions-general.php?page=better_feed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Eco Tech , Energy Harvesting Rail Pads , Environment , innowatech piezoelectric , Innowattech , Innowattech IPEG PAD , piezoelectric , Piezoelectric Devices , piezoelectric power , piezoelectric railroad , piezoelectricity , Railpads , Railway Pads , renewable energy , Technology

Go here to see the original:
New Piezoelectric Railways Harvest Energy From Passing Trains

Bad Behavior has blocked 2132 access attempts in the last 7 days.