This giant inflatable dome is made of hundreds of tiny pinhole cameras

February 8, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This giant inflatable dome is made of hundreds of tiny pinhole cameras

Artists often try to get viewers to appreciate different perspectives, but Rhode Island-based design collective Pneuhaus is taking the task literally. They’ve created a giant inflatable “Camera Compound” made of 109 tiny pinhole cameras. The innovative camera obscura – which takes the form of a 20-foot geodesic dome – invites guests to wander inside to get a different perspective on the world they live in. Each hexagonal piece of the dome structure contains a tiny pinhole, which, like a camera obscura , projects an inverted image onto the translucent interior. In this case, the pinholes were covered with a single magnifying glass to focus the incoming light in a way that produces a crisper image than most camera obscuras. The installation’s flexible opaque fabric lets visitors create their own images by distorting the images as they wish. Related: Colossal Camera Obscura frames the picture-perfect Dolomites According to the artists behind the creation, (Levi Bedall, August Lehrecke, Matthew Muller, Zachary Weindel), the interactive photography installation is designed to provide people with a sense of changing perceptions, “Compound Camera offers a more analog perspective on how our surroundings can change the way we perceive the world.” The art installation was recently on display for the Pawtucket Arts Festival in Rhode Island, but its just one of their many pneumatic architectural installations. In 2015, they unveiled an inflatable RGBubble pavilion on the Brown University campus and later, they created a crazy Bubble Dome made up of hundreds of TPU balls . + Pneuhaus Via Core 77 Images via Pneuhaus

Go here to read the rest: 
This giant inflatable dome is made of hundreds of tiny pinhole cameras

FEMA contractor failed to deliver millions of emergency meals to Puerto Rico

February 8, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on FEMA contractor failed to deliver millions of emergency meals to Puerto Rico

Millions of meals never made their way to Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria , according to Reuters . United States Democratic lawmakers recently said the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) awarded a contract of almost $156 million to a one-person company – which delivered 50,000 of an anticipated 30 million meals. The Atlanta-based FEMA contractor Tribute Contracting reneged on their commitment to deliver millions of meals to Puerto Rico after the island faced its “worst natural disaster in 90 years,” Reuters reported. House Oversight Committee Democrats referred to documents revealing the company delivered just thousands of meals. They were terminated for cause 20 days after they won the October 2017 contract from FEMA. This, the Democrats say, led to a “massive food shortage for weeks.” Related: $30M contract cancelled by FEMA after supplies to Puerto Rico fail to arrive Documents show Tribute had issues handling government contracts under $100,000 in the past and were barred from government work until 2019, according to Reuters. Elijah Cummings, representative for Maryland and top Democrat on the committee, and Stacey Plaskett, delegate for the United States Virgin Islands, wrote, “It is unclear why FEMA or any agency would have proceeded with a contract worth $156 million in light of this company’s poor contracting history and these explicit warnings.” Plaskett and Cummings sent a letter to chairman Trey Gowdy, Republican representative for South Carolina, asking him to subpoena FEMA for documents they say it has withheld for over three months regarding the failure to provide millions of emergency meals. They said in the letter their staff spoke with Tribute Contracting owner Tiffany Brown, who “explained that FEMA awarded the contract ‘because I was able to submit a proposal to supply 30 million meals at the cheapest cost.’ She stated that she ‘worked 24 hours a day, seven days a week to try and provide these emergency meals.’ She also explained FEMA knew she could not independently finance the production and delivery of this many meals in such a short time frame.” Gowdy spokesperson Amanda Gonzalez told Reuters although a subpoena was premature, they will continue to review hurricane recovery efforts. FEMA didn’t comment on Tribute but told Reuters when the contract was terminated, the distribution of food on the island “was not affected.” + House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Democrats + Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Letter Via Reuters Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

Original post:
FEMA contractor failed to deliver millions of emergency meals to Puerto Rico

Two photographers are sailing through Europe in amazing handbuilt houseboats

February 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Two photographers are sailing through Europe in amazing handbuilt houseboats

Collaborative artists Claudius Schulze and Maciej Markowicz are sailing through Europe in two self-built tiny homes. The 2BOATS (Übermut) will serve as traveling studios for the artists while they sail from Hamburg to Paris. Schulze’s houseboat is a wooden pontoon-style vessel, complete with an outdoor disco ball and hammock. Markowicz’s sleek floating studio pulls double duty as a fully functioning camera obscura, capturing the photographers’ journey in real time. Schulze’s houseboat is a wooden platform with an amazing covered deck and rooftop seating area, big enough to enjoy the stunning scenery as they sail through Europe’s waterways. The floating home and studio were made with reclaimed wood panels and a variety of old windows, which flood the homey interior with plenty of natural light. Related: How this photographer escaped the grid with her tiny Teardrop Trailer Markowic’s boat is a more modern vessel, and one that is used for pure photography purposes. Doubling as a camera obscura , the innovative vessel is capturing the photographer’s amazing journey. Once at port, the photographer invites guests on board to experience a real-time projection or see the photographic record of the artists’ journey. Schulze and Markowicz created the floating photography studios to make their way from Hamburg to Amsterdam’s Unseen Photo Fair and Paris Photo event, ending their journey at the Hamburg Triennale of Photography in June. Both artists are posting from their man-made ships. Schulze’s explorations can be found on his Instagram page and Markowicz can be found at ObscuraBus . + Claudius Schulze + Maciej Markowicz + 2BOATS Via This is Colossal Photography by Kevin McElvaney courtesy of Übermut Project

Originally posted here: 
Two photographers are sailing through Europe in amazing handbuilt houseboats

Melbourne architects turn an old terrace house into a gorgeous light-filled home

January 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Melbourne architects turn an old terrace house into a gorgeous light-filled home

Melbourne-based Ben Callery Architects converted a compact terrace house with limited square footage into a contemporary, light-filled home by going upwards and outwards. The renovation introduced a large rooftop deck, and natural light floods the interior, providing a strong connection with the outdoors. The Beyond House also takes advantage of a number of sustainable features including passive heating and cooling, solar power , water harvesting, and repurposed materials. The old row home was previously cramped in between two walls with little light, but by bringing the home design upwards, the architects were able to outfit the top level with a gorgeous open-air deck that allows the homeowners to enjoy a private outdoor space. Although adding this indoor/outdoor connection to the home was imperative to the renovation, the owners were also focused on creating a strong sustainability portfolio for their new home. Related: Low-impact Abbotsford Eco House uses recycled materials wherever possible in Melbourne “The owners are serious about sustainability and wanted the new addition to be naturally comfortable, using the sun for heating, breezes for cooling, water harvesting, solar power, recycled materials (even re-using the old kitchen),” the architects said. “We looked beyond the site constraints and beyond the typical spatial boundaries within a terrace house’s rooms and levels.” The strong connection to the outdoors continues throughout the interior, which was outfitted with strategically placed windows to bring in as much natural light to the living space as possible. In fact, every room in the house has a floor-to-ceiling glass door that provides optimal light, further fusing the indoor with the outdoor. + Ben Callery Architects Via Freshome Photography by Peter Bennetts via Ben Callery Architects

View post:
Melbourne architects turn an old terrace house into a gorgeous light-filled home

New satellite paves the way for full-color, full-motion video from space

January 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on New satellite paves the way for full-color, full-motion video from space

British company Earth-i just launched a new prototype satellite that paves the way for the “world’s first full-color, full-motion video satellite constellation.” CARBONITE-2 is a test version of the the Vivid-i commercial satellite constellation, and its imaging system “is designed to deliver 1m resolution images and color HD video clips with a swath width of 5km.” CARBONITE-2 (which the Earth-i team calls VividX2) blasted off from the Indian Space Research Organization ‘s Satash Dhawan Space Center aboard the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle late last week. Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL) manufactured the technology demonstration satellite. In their statement on the launch they said it “will demonstrate a low-cost video-from-orbit solution using Commercial-Off-The-Shelf technologies.” Related: Teen creates world’s lightest satellite and NASA is sending it to space An Ultra High Definition camera on CARBONITE-2 can snap high-resolution images and capture up to two minutes of video. The satellite weighs around 220 pounds, and it will orbit 314 miles, above the planet, moving at around 4.3 miles a second. European Space Agency Earth Observation Programs director Josef Aschbacher said in a statement, “The launch of VividX2 is a significant next development of Earth-i’s constellation, and welcomed by ESA. The Vivid-i Constellation will provide capabilities we haven’t seen before including full-color video, and an assured stream of high-quality data from space to help improve both our planet and lives on Earth.” The company said such images and videos could help governments or businesses monitor assets, track activities or changes, and even “predict future events with more certainty.” Earth-i has already ordered the next five satellites for Vivid-i from SSTL. Via Engadget , Earth-i , and Surrey Satellite Technology Limited Images via SSTL/Beaucroft Photography

Originally posted here:
New satellite paves the way for full-color, full-motion video from space

Shocking Caribbean photos reveal a "sea of plastic and Styrofoam"

October 26, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Shocking Caribbean photos reveal a "sea of plastic and Styrofoam"

We hear about the issue of ocean plastic a lot, but new photographs visually demonstrate just how pervasive the pollution is. Roatán-based photographer Caroline Power shared pictures on Facebook taken near the Caribbean island belonging to Honduras, revealing what she calls a “sea of plastic and Styrofoam”. Power said, “This has to stop.” Power shared photographs of waves of plastic garbage floating in seaweed in a part of the world we tend to think of as pristine. Pressure group Blue Planet Society said the trash could have come from the Montagua River in Guatemala. Related: Could France-sized ocean garbage patch become 196th nation? Power seems to have posted in hopes of prompting people to think about their own consumption of single-use plastic. She wrote in the Facebook post, “Think about your daily lives. How did you take your food to go last time you ate out? How was your last street food served? Chances are it was styrofoam and served with a plastic fork and then put in a plastic bag. Do you still use plastic garbage bags? Plastic soda bottles? Ziplock bags? Plastic wrap on your food? Do you buy toilet paper that comes wrapped in plastic instead of paper? Do you put your fruit and veggies in produce bags at the grocery?” Power challenged people and businesses to keep their garbage, after sorting out organic and recyclable trash, for a week. She said, “You will be disgusted by how many single-use items you use.” Every single year, eight million metric tons of plastic enter the world’s oceans . Plastic pollution isn’t just an eyesore; The Independent quoted statistics saying it’s harming over 600 species around the world. Around 100,000 marine animals and more than one million birds perish because of plastic every year. Surely we can do better? Via Caroline Power and The Independent Images via Caroline Power on Facebook

The rest is here: 
Shocking Caribbean photos reveal a "sea of plastic and Styrofoam"

Magical beauty of mushrooms is captured in Jill Bliss stunning arrangements

August 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Magical beauty of mushrooms is captured in Jill Bliss stunning arrangements

Flowers aren’t the only kinds of plants deserving of artistic arrangement. Artist and self-proclaimed nature nerd Jill Bliss shows off the magical beauty of mushrooms in her gorgeous temporary fungi arrangements in a series she calls ‘Nature Medleys.’ These stunning compositions show off the diverse texture, types, and colors of fungi in eye-catching detail. Jill Bliss lives, works, and travels the Salish Sea islands of Canada and Washington State where she collects natural objects and inspiration for her art. Bliss forages for the mushrooms in local forests and will often pair the fungi finds with other plants and objects found by the shore including shells and pieces of driftwood. Related: 3 edible mushrooms that are easy to find – and how to avoid the poisonous ones An incredible variety of mushrooms exist in the Pacific Northwest . One of her most popular and eye-catching mushroom choices is the vibrant purple gill mushroom. Bliss photographs her compositions and offers many as prints and stationery in her online shop. You can see more of her work on her website and Instagram . + Jill Bliss Via Colossal

Original post:
Magical beauty of mushrooms is captured in Jill Bliss stunning arrangements

Check out the otherworldly transformation of a salt-covered dress left at the bottom of the Dead Sea

September 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Check out the otherworldly transformation of a salt-covered dress left at the bottom of the Dead Sea

The Salt Bride dress is reminiscent of the ” traditional Hasidic garment ” worn by a character in the Yiddish play The Dybbuk . The play, penned by S. Ansky between 1913 and 1916, chronicles a bride possessed by evil who is exorcised. Landau’s art explores themes of death and change by focusing in on how the Dead Sea altered the dress’s appearance. Salt Bride is comprised of eight images shot during the dress’s transformation. Related: Petey Ulatan’s cubic landscapes reimagine the world full of sharp angles According to a statement from the Marlborough Contemporary, “Over time, the sea’s alchemy transforms the plain garment from a symbol associated with death and madness into the wedding dress it was always intended to be.” It’s not the first time Landau has worked with the Dead Sea as an essential part of her artwork. She has immersed other items in the sea and even created a floating art installation with watermelons in the sea. Landau said in a statement, “Over the years, I learnt more and more about this low and strange place. Still the magic is there waiting for us: new experiments, ideas, and understandings. It is like meeting with a different time system, a different logic, another planet. It looks like snow, like sugar, like death’s embrace; solid tears, like a white surrender to fire and water combined.” Salt Bride will be on display at the Marlborough Contemporary through September 3. + Sigalit Landau + Marlborough Contemporary Images courtesy of Sigalit Landau/Marlborough Contemporary, Matanya Tausig/Marlborough Contemporary, and Shaxaf Haber/Marlborough Contemporary

Excerpt from: 
Check out the otherworldly transformation of a salt-covered dress left at the bottom of the Dead Sea

Steve Axford captures the hidden world of rare and undocumented fungi

August 11, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Steve Axford captures the hidden world of rare and undocumented fungi

The unusual diversity of shapes, colors and textures of these fungi is a visual reminder of just how beautiful life on this planet really is. Each specimen, photographed in its natural environment, is a testament that nothing exists in isolation, and everything is interconnected.  All of the fungi is left untouched and unaltered, documented by Axford so that people around the world can enjoy the ethereal beauty. Related: Surprising Photos Reveal the Enchanting World of Fungi Some months ago Axford left his beloved Australia to wander around with his camera throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of Xishuangbanna, in China and Chiang Mai, in Thailand . What he found was a handful of species that may be unknown to science and documented for the first time. The new images include a types like the Amanita hemibapha eggs and Cookeina Tricholoma , a bizarre-looking cup-shaped, hairy fungi we can now admire thanks to the photograph’s lens. + Steve Axford Via This is Colossal Photos by Steve Axford

Read the original post: 
Steve Axford captures the hidden world of rare and undocumented fungi

Petey Ulatans cubic landscapes reimagine the world full of sharp angles

August 8, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Petey Ulatans cubic landscapes reimagine the world full of sharp angles

Ulatan’s artistic interpretation of the world as a cube is not the same treatment as taking other round objects and making them cubic, such as the cube-shaped watermelons grown in Japan. Rather, his vision reflects something closer to science fiction, where Earth’s corners face inward to create exceptionally geometric valleys that defy gravity. Ulatan, who unveiled his cubist world in a series of curious images on Instagram , bends a number of familiar scenes at 90-degree angles, making for some very interesting—and head turning—possibilities. Related: Artist uses spider webs to create spellbinding cubes of eerie art The squared-off world of Ulatan’s creations takes everything we know about the Earth’s physical attributes and turns them, well, sideways. A sailboat can now not only glide along the water’s surface, but can also take a 90-degree turn up or down. Smoke flowing up from a factory’s stacks might spew from two different planes, intersecting at a sharp angle. A relaxing day by the lake may require folks to crane their neck in order to get a view across the water, as the vantage point reaches straight down from a drop-off. Ulatan’s cubic world doesn’t need to explain its bizarre physics or impossible gravity . It doesn’t require an explanation of how its shape came to be. Rather, his series of manipulated images serves a more esoteric purpose, which is to inspire people to look at the world in a different way. + Petey Ulatan’s website + Petey Ulatan on Instagram Via Architectural Digest Images via Petey Ulatan

Here is the original:
Petey Ulatans cubic landscapes reimagine the world full of sharp angles

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 954 access attempts in the last 7 days.