Experts say we now have "clear evidence" cell phone radiation causes cancer in rats

April 3, 2018 by  
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Does cell phone radiation cause cancer ? There’s no firm answer to that question, but Quartz reported experts show, following three days of peer review sessions over two National Toxicology Program (NTP) draft reports, there is “clear evidence” phone radiation led to heart cancer in rats . NTP’s draft reports came out earlier in 2018; at that time a National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) news release said, “High exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) in rodents resulted in tumors in tissues surrounding nerves in the hearts of male rats, but not female rats or any mice,” and noted the expert review to take place over March 26 to 28 . Quartz said all the results were then described as equivocal — the scientists didn’t think their information was clear enough to pin down if radiation led to the health effects. Related: Images Show How Much Cell Phone Radiation We Bathe in Every Day Peer reviewers, including toxicologists, engineers, biostaticians, and brain and heart pathologists, scrutinized the data and upgraded multiple conclusions to “some evidence” or “clear evidence,” Quartz said. NTP exposed mice and rats to varying levels of RFR for as long as two years. NIEHS said, “The exposure levels used in the studies were equal to and higher than the highest level permitted for local tissue exposure in cell phone emissions today. Cell phones typically emit lower levels of RFR than the maximum level allowed.” We certainly can’t say for sure at this point that cell phone radiation causes cancer in humans. NTP senior scientist John Bucher said in NIEHS’ February news release, “The levels and duration of exposure to RFR were much greater than what people experience with even the highest level of cell phone use, and exposed the rodents’ whole bodies. So, these findings should not be directly extrapolated to human cell phone usage. We note, however, that the tumors we saw in these studies are similar to tumors previously reported in some studies of frequent cell phone users.” + National Toxicology Program Draft Reports + National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Via Quartz Images via Hassan OUAJBIR on Unsplash and Matthew Kane on Unsplash

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Experts say we now have "clear evidence" cell phone radiation causes cancer in rats

The affordable, carbon-positive CORE 9 house generates more energy than it uses

April 3, 2018 by  
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With its CORE 9 home, architecture firm Beaumont Concepts aims to redefine how affordable sustainable housing is designed and built. The compact, low-maintenance house can be adapted for energy ratings from 6 to 10-star, which allows it to accommodate a range of budgets. The architects collaborated with a team of building designers and thermal performance professionals in order to develop affordable homes that respond to Australia’s climate. The resulting design, named CORE, is a carbon-positive home that relies on renewable energy sources and feeds surplus energy back to the grid. Related: Passive Erpingham House in Australia is affordable, light-filled and easily replicable The team used a selection of recycled and sustainable materials with a low embodied energy . These materials themselves can be up-cycled or re-processed after use. Cross-ventilation and maximum use of northern light help to reduce heating and cooling loads. In order to keep costs as low as possible, the designers also incorporated an inverted roof truss, which allows more light into the building but doesn’t require any specialist construction methods or additional costs. + Beaumont Concepts Via Archdaily Photos by Warren Reed and Leo Edwards

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The affordable, carbon-positive CORE 9 house generates more energy than it uses

LGs new smartphone repels mosquitos using sound waves

October 30, 2017 by  
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Forget bug spray — LG recently unveiled a new smartphone that repels mosquitos using sound waves. The India-exclusive K7i smartphone is a fairly ordinary phone with a 5-inch HD display, 2GB of RAM, and 16GB of storage. Except its unique Mosquito Away feature sets it apart from other devices. By using ultrasonic sound wave technology, pesky mosquitos are supposedly driven away from the vicinity of the phone. The Mosquito Away feature was previously installed in the company’s air conditioners, washing machines, and TVs. According to LG , the ultrasonic waves are “absolutely safe” for humans. Additionally, the technology is silent, odorless and also user-friendly. It is presently selling for 7,990 rupees in India — or $121. Unfortunately, it’s not clear whether or not the technology actually works. The  BBC , for instance, says the tech is a myth. And according to Bart Knols, an entomologist who chairs the advisory board of the Dutch Malaria Foundation, there is “no scientific evidence whatsoever” that mosquitos can be driven away using ultrasonic sound technology. Related: Flesh-eating bacteria might be spread by mosquitoes in Australia If the Mosquito Away feature does work, the technology could have grand implications. Nearly half of the world’s population is at risk of malaria. In 2015,  212 million malaria cases were reported , which resulted in 429,000 deaths. Through prevention and control measures, there has been a 29 percent reduction in malaria mortality globally since 2010. However, the parasite which is spread by mosquitos still puts populations at risk, particularly in third-world nations. Via Phone Radar , The Verge Images via LG , Pixabay , YouTube

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LGs new smartphone repels mosquitos using sound waves

American fern inspires groundbreaking new solar storage solution

April 3, 2017 by  
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Energy storage has been a leading obstacle to widespread adoption of solar energy , but that may be about to change. A new nature-inspired electrode developed by two scientists at RMIT University in Australia could hold the key to drastically improved storage. Their electrode, which is based on patterns in the western swordfern, could boost the capacity of storage technologies by a staggering 3,000 percent. The groundbreaking electrode is made with graphene , and according to the university, could open the door to flexible, thin solar capture and storage technology. This would allow us to place a thin film on smartphones, cars, or buildings – enabling them to power themselves with solar energy. Related: Pocket-sized HeLi-on charger uses flexible, printed solar cells to power your phone The two researchers found inspiration for their prototype in the veins of the Polystichum munitum , a native western North American fern. Researcher Min Gu said in a statement, “The leaves of the western swordfern are densely crammed with veins, making them extremely efficient for storing energy and transporting water around the plant. Our electrode is based on these fractal shapes – which are self-replicating, like the mini structures within snowflakes – and we’ve used this naturally efficient design to improve solar energy storage at a nano level.” The electrode could be combined with supercapacitors , which have been combined with solar already but haven’t been widely utilized for storage due to limited capacity. But the scientists’ prototype can increase their capacity 30 times greater than current limits, according to Gu. The journal Scientific Reports published the research online the end of March. Paper lead author Litty Thekkekara said by using their electrode with a solar cell, we could develop flexible thin film solar, replacing the rigid, bulky solar cells that are limited in use. Smartphone batteries would become a thing of the past, and hybrid cars wouldn’t need charging stations, if scientists could build on this research to develop thin film solar. Via RMIT University Images via RMIT University

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American fern inspires groundbreaking new solar storage solution

Smart Taiga Tower is like having an 80 square foot garden right inside your home

October 11, 2016 by  
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People with limited space know all about the struggle: you want fresh produce but you lack the yard for a big garden and those indoor gardens take up all your counter space.  That’s why we are all about the genius Taiga Tower. It’s a smart home garden that fits in any space and leaves your counters free for chopping up all those fresh herbs you’ll be growing. It’s clever design is big enough for 50 plants – like having an 80 square foot garden inside. Better yet, it has full-spectrum LED lighting and a self-watering system built-in, so even the blackest thumb doesn’t have to suffer in a fresh produce-free nightmare. It even hooks up to an app so you can control everything from your phone. Like I said, genius. https://vimeo.com/183591660#at=121 + Taiga Tower The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Smart Taiga Tower is like having an 80 square foot garden right inside your home

Artist turns vintage postcards into extraordinary layered landscapes

October 11, 2016 by  
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Rossato is an Italian artist living between the  ultra-urbanized London and the romantic Venice. Her pieces celebrate vintage aesthetics and the juxtaposition of natural and man-made  designs. She gets inspired by old images and frequently asks herself what happens to the photographs not taken, or to the images captured only from the eyes – concepts she tries to reflect in her work. Related: Bovey Lee’s intricate paper-cut art questions the relationship between chaos and growth Dèja vu and Greetings are the latest series from an exercise of mixing 78 cutout postcards where snowy mountains, luscious trees and watercourses are recomposed in a new designed landscape. Although frequently pictured white, the sky works as a recurring reference point, unifying each landscape in its infinitive compositions. If you enjoyed Dèja vu and Greetings check Remapping Landscape , where Rossato takes the technique a step further by digitalizing and flattening the compositions. + Caterina Rossato Via Fubiz

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Artist turns vintage postcards into extraordinary layered landscapes

Not All Recycling Apps Created Equal

May 11, 2016 by  
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We’ve all heard the tongue-in-cheek ‘there’s an app for that.’  Spend a few minutes online (better yet on your phone) and you’ll likely be convinced yourself if skeptical.  Whether for connection, amusement, education,…

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Not All Recycling Apps Created Equal

The top 7 wearable tech innovations of 2015

December 26, 2015 by  
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Clothes have come a long way since the loin cloth. These days, they can fight ocean pollution , produce energy, and even charge your phone. If you haven’t been following the latest innovations in wearable technology, we highly recommend you head over to our sister site Ecouterre, where we’ve rounded up the top 7 new developments of 2015. Seriously, it will blow your mind. READ MORE >

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The top 7 wearable tech innovations of 2015

Cracked cellphone screens will soon be able to repair themselves

June 23, 2015 by  
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Have you ever been misfortunate or clumsy enough to drop your phone, leaving a spiderweb of cracks that, at best, serves as an embarrassing conversation starter or, at worst, turns your phone into an expensive paperweight? Within five years, our smartphones could all hold the technology to self-repair cracks completely on their own. Read the rest of Cracked cellphone screens will soon be able to repair themselves Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: carbon based healing agents , carbon fiber composites , cellphone screen crack , duncan wass , self repairing cellphone screen , self repairing screen , smartphone screen crack , university of bristol

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Cracked cellphone screens will soon be able to repair themselves

HOW TO: Make a $5 wind-powered phone charger for your bike

June 12, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of HOW TO: Make a $5 wind-powered phone charger for your bike Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: $5 Cell Phone Bike Charger , 16-Year-Old Inventor , CPU fan , DIY , old phone battery , phone charger instruction

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HOW TO: Make a $5 wind-powered phone charger for your bike

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