Abandoned nuclear power plant given new life as a solar farm

July 10, 2017 by  
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Solar farms can pop up in unlikely places – like the site of an old, unfinished nuclear power plant in Tennessee . The Phipps Bend Nuclear Power Plant was abandoned in 1981, but today nearly 3,000 solar panels rest on the site. The new one megawatt (MW) farm provides clean energy for around 100 homes. The Phipps Bend Nuclear Power Plant has scarred the landscape since it was abandoned in 1981. Popular concern over the Three Mile Island incident and increased costs to meet regulations prompted the Tennessee Valley Authority Board of Directors to stop building the nuclear plant, which was once expected to re-energize the local economy. Phipps Bend was never operational, and for decades was utilized only for safety training exercises. Related: China is building a giant solar plant at Chernobyl That was until Birdseye Renewable Energy and United Renewable Energy came along. Birdseye already boasts over 430 MW of clean energy greenfield projects. They installed solar panels on around four acres on the old nuclear plant site. The panels rotate throughout the day to maximize the energy they absorb from the sun. Holston Electric will purchase the electricity to power homes in eastern Tennessee. The Phipps Bend Nuclear Power Plant would have been large if completed, offering more than 2,400 MW and powering around 1.8 million households. The new solar farm at Phipps Bend won’t be able to meet that, but it will generate around 1,100 to 1,400 megawatt-hours per year, and it will be operational for at least 30 years. United Renewable Energy executive vice president Keith Herbs said in a statement, “Due to its location, this project visibly demonstrates how clean, efficient solar energy matches other forms of power generation to meet our country’s growing energy needs.” The United States has around 100 cancelled nuclear power plants – perhaps some of them could receive new life as solar farms as well. Via PRNewswire and Electrek Images via United Renewable Energy and Wikimedia Commons

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Abandoned nuclear power plant given new life as a solar farm

Worlds largest rotating solar plant to be built in South Korea

July 10, 2017 by  
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South Korea is known for its workaholic culture and for hosting an enormous LEGO tower . But soon, the country may be known for something even more impressive: installing the largest rotating solar plant in the world. Solkiss, a South Korean solar developer, has plans to install a proposed 2.67 MW PV project at the Deoku Reservoir. Not only will the plant float on top of the water, it will follow the sun’s movement throughout the day. Solkiss’ technology enables solar power stations to float on water and rotate in unison with the sun’s movements. According to the developer, the technology delivers 22 percent extra solar energy yield compared to a fixed installation on land, as well as a 16 percent increase in yield compared to a typical floating solar array. The installation on Deoku Reservoir isn’t the only floating solar array Solkiss has planned. Two additional solar plants are planned for the Myeoku Reservoir. All three installations are expected to be completed by the end of November. When combined, they will add 3MW of solar PV capacity to the solar developer’s portfolio. Related: World’s cutest solar farm in China is shaped like a panda The company has made great progress since its first floating solar development , which was installed in 2014 at a reservoir in Anseong, south of Seoul. Using its patented rotating motors, Solkiss was able to generate 465 kW from the array. To help South Korea shift away from “dirty energy” sources, such as nuclear and coal , Solkiss will be installing more rotating solar plants at viable reservoir sites across the country. + Solkiss Via PV Magazine Images via YouTube screenshot , Solkiss , Pixabay

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Worlds largest rotating solar plant to be built in South Korea

100% solar-powered winery keeps naturally cool with cork-insulated roofs

July 10, 2017 by  
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An off-grid Spanish winery is harnessing the full power of the sun to ripen grapes and turn the fruit into wine. Local studio Munarq Arquitectes designed Son Juliana’s winery that’s entirely powered by renewable energy on the Spanish island of Majorca. The low-lying building comprises a prefabricated concrete structure built in just 15 days and uses natural materials to blend into its surroundings. Built facing the Tramuntana mountains in the distance, the off-grid winery lies low to the flat, clay terrain in a linear shape informed by the landscape and wine production process. The grapes enter the entrance to the east, where it then passes through several processing rooms until the wine is bottled and labeled and finally put on display and tasted in the sales room at the west entrance. The 1,300-square-meter facility can produce 40,000 liters of wine each year. The winery’s prefabricated concrete structure is clad in marés, a local sandy stone, for the facade and lined in ceramic bricks for the interior. Powered entirely with renewable energy, the winery keeps cool with passive ventilation and use of concrete and stone walls, as well as the sloping cork -lined roof, for insulation. Taking advantage of the earth’s thermal mass, the architects built the winery in the basement to meet the special temperature and humidity requirements. Related: Mexican winery built from recycled wood and rammed earth blends into the valley landscape “The retaining walls are stone gabions to take advantage of the thermal mass and soil moisture that remained during the summer,” wrote the architects. “The contribution of ventilation and temperature is carried through pipes connected to geothermal heat pumps.” + Munarq Arquitectes Via Dezeen Images via Munarq Arquitectes

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100% solar-powered winery keeps naturally cool with cork-insulated roofs

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