Endangered green and loggerhead turtles make Mediterranean comeback

August 17, 2018 by  
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For 10,000 years, green and loggerhead turtles have been nesting on the Mediterranean coast of Cyprus. In the last 100 years, they have been hunted to the brink of extinction. Thankfully, due to pioneering conservation efforts made by Cypriot marine biologists, these endearing reptiles have seen a promising bounce-back in numbers, pulling them away from the brink of extinction. Related: Turtle hatchlings spotted on Mumbai beach for the first time in nearly 20 years For thousands of years, the turtles have hatched on Cyprus’s Lara Beach, fighting the waves as they make their way to the ocean and begin their lives. The reptiles return 20 to 30 years later to lay eggs and bring about the next generation of turtle hatchlings. This phenomenon is a result of the turtles’ own biological programming, which calls them back to the same beaches that their ancestors chose long ago. Conservationists have been working tirelessly to save the endangered green and loggerhead turtle populations for four decades. Their efforts began in 1978, when only 300 turtle nests remained on Cyprus’s shores. The result is “quite spectacular,” according to Andreas Demetropoulos, founder and co-head of a turtle conservation program overseen by Cyprus’s Fisheries and Marine Research Department. His program reported approximately 1,100 nests last year alone, over three times as many as there were at the program’s beginning. Related: Sea turtles appear to be “bouncing back” from the brink of extinction The green and loggerhead turtles only nest in two countries, Turkey and Cyprus. Of the 1,500 egg-laying female green turtles, approximately 200-300 return to Cyprus to lay their eggs. More than twice as many loggerhead turtles do the same. To protect them, Cyprus’s government began its conservation program long before any other EU country, and in 1989 it passed legislation that protected two beaches that the turtles use as hatching grounds. Prior to this, residents would use the beach without regard for the turtles, but in the intervening years a conservationist culture has arisen. According to the program’s other co-head, Myroula Hadjichristophorou, “When people come [to the beaches] with their families, their children, they see the babies coming out of their nests, this is something that they will never forget.” + Sea Turtle Organization Via Phys.org

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Endangered green and loggerhead turtles make Mediterranean comeback

Venice’s canals go dry following weeks without rain

February 5, 2018 by  
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Venice has historically had a problem with too much water inundating its canals, but thanks to a combination of low tides and a lack of rain over the last few weeks, the sinking city’s waterways have turned into channels of mud. Indeed, unusual weather patterns have caused Venice’s water levels to plummet by more than two feet (60cm), rendering a number of channels completely unusable. And with no way to move through the city, many locals have left their boats and gondolas to languish in the muck. The Independent reports that dip in water is the direct result of low tides caused by the super blue blood moon paired with unseasonably dry weather. This, however, is not the first time the Italian city has seen its canals go dry; in 2016, water levels fell by 2.16 feet (66cm), and in 2008 and 1989 levels dropped by 2.95 feet (90cm). The canals are expected to return to normal when the rain returns. Related: Italy is giving away hundreds of historic castles and villas for free  While the phenomenon is surely alarming, flooding remains the biggest threat to the city.  Quarternary International published a report last year forecasting that Venice could disappear by the end of the century as a result of rising sea levels caused by climate change . The Mediterranean Sea is in fact predicted to rise by 4.59 feet (140cm) before 2100. The city itself is also sinking at a rate of about 1-2mm a year. Via Independent UK Images via Wiki Commons and Flickr

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Venice’s canals go dry following weeks without rain

Two photographers are sailing through Europe in amazing handbuilt houseboats

February 5, 2018 by  
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Collaborative artists Claudius Schulze and Maciej Markowicz are sailing through Europe in two self-built tiny homes. The 2BOATS (Übermut) will serve as traveling studios for the artists while they sail from Hamburg to Paris. Schulze’s houseboat is a wooden pontoon-style vessel, complete with an outdoor disco ball and hammock. Markowicz’s sleek floating studio pulls double duty as a fully functioning camera obscura, capturing the photographers’ journey in real time. Schulze’s houseboat is a wooden platform with an amazing covered deck and rooftop seating area, big enough to enjoy the stunning scenery as they sail through Europe’s waterways. The floating home and studio were made with reclaimed wood panels and a variety of old windows, which flood the homey interior with plenty of natural light. Related: How this photographer escaped the grid with her tiny Teardrop Trailer Markowic’s boat is a more modern vessel, and one that is used for pure photography purposes. Doubling as a camera obscura , the innovative vessel is capturing the photographer’s amazing journey. Once at port, the photographer invites guests on board to experience a real-time projection or see the photographic record of the artists’ journey. Schulze and Markowicz created the floating photography studios to make their way from Hamburg to Amsterdam’s Unseen Photo Fair and Paris Photo event, ending their journey at the Hamburg Triennale of Photography in June. Both artists are posting from their man-made ships. Schulze’s explorations can be found on his Instagram page and Markowicz can be found at ObscuraBus . + Claudius Schulze + Maciej Markowicz + 2BOATS Via This is Colossal Photography by Kevin McElvaney courtesy of Übermut Project

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Two photographers are sailing through Europe in amazing handbuilt houseboats

Scientists find the Earth’s constant hum is best heard from the ocean floor

December 12, 2017 by  
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European scientists have determined that the Earth’s unceasing humming is best heard from the ocean floor , presenting opportunities to better understand this mysterious phenomenon. Although the sound is far below the human hearing threshold, the Earth is constantly humming. While scientists have been aware of the Earth’s humming since 1959, with more definitive research emerging in 1998, the source of the sounds remains a mystery. Nonetheless, recent research using ocean-bottom seismometer stations has provided scientists with a clearer picture of the phenomenon than ever before. “It’s like taking a piano and slamming all the keys at the same time,” said Spahr Webb of Columbia University’s Earth Institute, according to National Geographic . “Except they’re not nice harmonics. They’re oddball frequencies.” The researchers, who hail from various earth science institutes across Europe , searched through seismometer records gathered from an area that stretches more than 1,200 square miles to the east of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean . Using this data, the team determined two high-quality seismometer stations from which it extracted the sound of a humming Earth. However, at 2.9 to 4.5 millihertz, the vibrations are nearly 10,000 times lower than the frequencies that humans can detect. From this data, scientists were able to determine that the loudness of the hum does not change over time, contradicting previous studies that documented a range of amplitude for the sound. Related: Everything we know about the Earth’s mantle is completely wrong A better understanding Earth’s humming may prove invaluable to creating a more comprehensive map of Earth’s interior, which is usually only able to be studied during earthquakes . Although the recent study has not definitely determined the source and nature of Earth’s humming, it has clarified the phenomenon and offered opportunities for further research. “To better understand where the signal comes from, we believe that observing oscillations from the ocean bottom can help,” said study co-author Martha Deen, according to National Geographic. The most recent study credits atmospheric turbulence and ocean waves with causing the sounds, though this is far from conclusive. Via National Geographic Images via Depositphotos (1)

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Scientists find the Earth’s constant hum is best heard from the ocean floor

Radioactive “Petrified” Forests in Chernobyl’s Exclusion Zone Could Spread Contamination to Safe Areas

March 18, 2014 by  
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It would be logical to think that after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster , forests around the site would slowly rot. But the terrible radiation blast in 1986 has left dead trees and leaf litter unable to decompose. A recently published study conducted by a team of US scientists explains the phenomenon of these “petrified” forests, and explores the consequences of the meltdown on local wildlife. Read the rest of Radioactive “Petrified” Forests in Chernobyl’s Exclusion Zone Could Spread Contamination to Safe Areas Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Chernobyl forest fires , Chernobyl forests , Chernobyl nuclear disaster , Chernobyl petrified forests , Chernobyl wildlife , nuclear radiation Chernobyl , radiation blast , scientific study University of South Carolina , University of South Carolina biologists        

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Radioactive “Petrified” Forests in Chernobyl’s Exclusion Zone Could Spread Contamination to Safe Areas

Escaped Pet Birds Are Teaching Wild Birds to Speak English

September 15, 2011 by  
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Photo: enlewof / cc Across parts of Australia, reports have been pouring in of strange voices chattering high in the treetops — mysterious, non-sensical conversations in English. But while this phenomenon is certainly quite odd, its explanation isn’t paranormal. It turns out that escaped pet birds, namely parrots and cockatoos, have begun teaching their wild bird counterparts a bit of the language they picked up from their time in captivity — and, according to witnesses, that includes more than a few explicatives…. Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Bringing Black Turtles Back from the Brink With Photography

September 15, 2011 by  
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Photo via Neil Ever Osborne Have you heard of the black sea turtle? Odds are you haven’t. Species like loggerhead, leatherback and hawksbill tend to dominate conservation news headlines. However, the black sea turtle (a morph of the green turtle) nearly disappeared from the planet, and still teeters precariously toward extinction. A special project aims to shed light on not only the plight of this species, but the amazing story about how it has made a recovery thanks to the hope-beyond-hope efforts of a handful of people…. Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Bringing Black Turtles Back from the Brink With Photography

How Social Networks Influence Consumer Behavior

September 2, 2010 by  
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Ask ten people about how to make Twitter work for a company and you’ll likely get ten answers.  But, as Lynn Miller of OrganicMania said to me recently: [laughing] “There’s really no science here.”  And while there’s no science, the tenets of classic consumer behavior may shed some light on the why. I teach consumer behavior and use the text book Consumer Behavior: Building Marketing Strategy .  The book tells us: …even in an individualistic society like America, group membership and identity are important to all of us.  And while we don’t like to think of ourselves as conformists, most of us conform to group expectations most of the time

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How Social Networks Influence Consumer Behavior

We Ecopreneurs- empowering local village women for sustainable income generation

September 1, 2010 by  
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Recently our campaign Climate Project Connectors started a new voluntary initiative “We Ecopreneurs” to empower local village women in the sub division Balakot (Pakistan) by exploiting opportunities for income generation through organic farming.

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We Ecopreneurs- empowering local village women for sustainable income generation

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