Kraft Heinz sustainability chief reflects on ‘interdependence’

October 28, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Kraft Heinz sustainability chief reflects on ‘interdependence’

Kraft Heinz sustainability chief reflects on ‘interdependence’ Heather Clancy Wed, 10/28/2020 – 01:00 Food company Kraft Heinz has been relatively quiet about its corporate sustainability strategy in the five years since it was formed through the merger of food giants Kraft and Heinz — stepping out in early 2018 to provide an update . In September, the maker of well-known brands such as Kraft Macaroni & Cheese, Planter’s Nuts and Heinz Ketchup — which had $25 billion in revenue last year — spoke up again with a second combined report that shows it stalled on 2020 goals for energy and water through last year (it will miss both) and doubles down on work to create circular production processes for packaging (it’s ahead of schedule and will introduce the first circular Heinz bottle in Europe next year). Kraft Heinz also updated its commitments with new targets pegged to 2025. Here are some of the latest commitments, along with perspective on progress so far: Procure most electricity from renewable sources by 2025 and decrease energy usage by 15 percent. The company didn’t previously have a renewables target, but it has been emphasizing a goal to reduce energy consumption (per metric ton of product produced) by 15 percent, which it had hoped to achieve by this year. Through 2019, it managed a 1 percent reduction against a 2015 baseline. Decrease water usage by 20 percent at high-risk sites and 15 percent overall by 2025 (per metric ton of product made). The company had hoped to reduce consumption by 15 percent by this year, against a 2015 baseline, but it actually increased water use by 1 percent per metric ton of product produced.   Decrease waste by 20 percent across all Kraft Heinz manufacturing operations by 2025. That’s a higher percentage than its previous commitment, which focused on waste to landfill. The company actually increased waste to landfill by 16 percent through 2019 but is has pledged to focus more closely on “a strong byproducts plan, product donation strategy and improved forecasting.” Make 100 percent recyclable, reusable or compostable packaging by 2025. Through 2019, it has achieved 70 percent. Kraft Heinz is undergoing an assessment so it can set a science-based target for greenhouse gas emissions reduction. Emissions have increased since its 2015 baseline, although the company managed a 5 percent cut from 2018 to 2019. Responsible sourcing is a big focus , with the company aiming for 100 percent sustainably sourced tomatoes by 2025, 100 percent sustainable and traceable palm oil by 2022, and 100 percent cage-free eggs globally by 2025 (among other ingredients). Rashida La Lande, general counsel at Kraft Heinz, took on responsibility for the company’s environmental, social and governance (ESG) strategy at the end of 2018. I caught up with her recently for a brief conversation as the company disclosed its new target, chatting about how best practices from the previously independent companies have been shared, how the pandemic has affected progress and what’s to come for sustainable agricultural practices. Below is a transcript of that discussion, edited for style and length. Heather Clancy: It seems unusual for a general counsel to have this role. What prompted the decision to make it part of your responsibilities? Rashida La Lande: I think it was a couple of things. There are some general counsels that have it. It sometimes falls within corporate affairs, sometimes it falls within procurement. I think for depending on where you see it, it kind of reflects the way that the company might focus on the issue. From our perspective I think it reflects several things. One, it reflects the fact that it’s a passion of mine. It’s something I view, and I think is important. And I think at the time our CEO wanted to make sure that someone who was passionate about it and had real sense of the business and the industry was leading it. The environmental and, of course, the social are hugely important to us but we really start from the perspective of how can we design policy and reporting to maximize our result. In addition, when we look at ESG, I think the fact that it’s within legal also reflects the heavy importance that we put on its governance. From the governance part of it — meaning the reporting level of the board, the oversight, the disclosure — we really truly do believe that what you track, what you measure, what you report on, what you compensate on are the things that you see effectively change. So, of course, the environmental and, of course, the social are hugely important to us but we really start from the perspective of how can we design policy and reporting to maximize our result. Clancy: How is your team blending the legacy knowledge of the two separate programs at Kraft and Heinz? La Lande: That’s a really good question. Business continuity was the primary focus of the merger and of aligning the two companies. And they had very different sustainability programs at the time. Right now, what we’re trying to do is to make sure that the ESG focuses on the key parts of our enterprise strategy so we put the time and resources behind our commitments and where we think we can drive the biggest change. With the merger, we’re able to assess what each company was doing and how they were thinking about it. Frankly [we could] identify where we can take the things that they were doing best and then identify the things that each side needed to do better. So, for example, we had strong sustainable palm oil sourcing programs on the Kraft side whereas on the Heinz side there was a really strong focus on agricultural and sustainable agriculture commitments stemming from ketchup and our use of tomatoes. … Both companies had really strong histories of philanthropical support, Heinz in particular with the relationship it had in Pittsburgh. And so it’s coming together and really thinking about as a food company how can we best talk about food insecurity and feeding people globally, which is something that really gels from both companies’ background. Media Source Courtesy of Media Authorship Kraft Heinz Close Authorship Clancy: How has the pandemic changed the focus of the Kraft Heinz ESG team? La Lande: It really put a focus on how much of a global company we are and our interdependence through all of our systems, businesses, units and people. And frankly, it has highlighted some of the ways that our global ESG perspective [is a strength] for us as a company and how important it is for our strategy. One of the things that we have been talking about since I started working on ESG is how important it is for us to support our community in their time of need. So we really looked at places where we’ve got employees and factories and consumers and customers, and we started to do more programming around not only the food insecurity but also making sure that we were available to people at the time of the disaster. So when the pandemic hit, it really caused us to quickly recognize that how we were thinking about this already, in terms of community, disaster relief and feeding people, put us in a really unique position to be impactful and to think about the global need that was going to be coming from the pandemic. So, we committed to provide meals to those in need and trying to do what we could to eliminate global hunger. And the pandemic just punctuated the need. At this point, to date, we’ve donated more than $15 million in financial and product support to help people all across the globe access the food that they need. And we’ve done it both in a fast time, mobile way as well as [through] a local touchpoint where we have business and community impact. Clancy: I know I’m jumping around a little bit. That’s the nature of having only a few minutes with you. What is the company’s policy for protecting biodiversity? La Lande: Right now, we’re working to update our sustainable agricultural practice by the end of 2020. We’re doing the work with a very seasoned agricultural team … primarily coming from the Heinz side but not exclusively. We have a strong history of sustainable agriculture. We’re working with developing that program further based on input from our growers and our suppliers, the farmers that we buy from. And we even have an upcoming “In Our Roots” program where we’re going to be working with suppliers to ensure that all of their agricultural practices satisfy our customer needs for safe food and traceable origin, [and] satisfy consumer demands for reliable supply, particularly of affordable nutritious food. We focus on promoting and protecting the health and welfare and the economic prosperity of the farmers, the workers, the employees and the communities within our supply chain. We’re very focused on minimizing our adverse effects on the Earth’s natural resources and biodiversity. We think those are the ways that we’re going to contribute, and that’s what we’re focusing on as we develop this program. We expect to roll it out more effectively — more widely, I should say — in 2021. Our main focus is on being good stewards of the environment, sourcing responsibilities, tracking and verifying where our ingredients come from, making our concerns and commitments with our suppliers and our supply chain very clear. Clancy: Will regenerative ag be part of that? La Lande: I think that is one of the things that we’re talking about, but I think we’ll have an ability to think more specifically about it once we make a more specific announcement in 2021. Clancy: Fair enough. How does Kraft Heinz blend environmental justice considerations into its ESG strategy? La Lande: Our main focus is on being good stewards of the environment, sourcing responsibilities, tracking and verifying where our ingredients come from, making our concerns and commitments with our suppliers and our supply chain very clear. Working and partnering with our supply chain to make sure that they have the training and expertise and understanding of our expectations. And verifying our ingredients, where they come from, what the impacts of our operations are. Through all of this, we think we’re better able to ensure that our environmental impacts are not so delineated by socioeconomic or demographic lines and instead really focus on how we can impact and have good stewardship worldwide. That’s why you see one of our key pillars being environmental stewardship as a global strategy. Clancy: You probably have 18 priorities or probably 18 million priorities. But what do you feel is your most important priority in this moment? La Lande : My goodness. I do have 18 million priorities. But for me, I think in this moment in the pandemic it’s really the focus on feeding people. There is a lot of hardship that people are facing. Unfortunately, I think there’s going to be more hardship kind of globally before we [as a society] get ourselves out of the position that we’re currently in. So I think while everything that we’re doing is extremely important, I think the day-to-day needs that we’re seeing and addressing those needs for people have to be at the forefront of what we do and have to be our first commitment. Pull Quote The environmental and, of course, the social are hugely important to us but we really start from the perspective of how can we design policy and reporting to maximize our result. Our main focus is on being good stewards of the environment, sourcing responsibilities, tracking and verifying where our ingredients come from, making our concerns and commitments with our suppliers and our supply chain very clear. Topics Food & Agriculture Collective Insight The GreenBiz Interview Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Kraft Heinz general counsel Rashida La Lande leads the giant food company’s corporate social responsibility and ESG strategy. Courtesy of Kraft Heinz Close Authorship

Go here to read the rest:
Kraft Heinz sustainability chief reflects on ‘interdependence’

AMD’s energy-slashing feat

July 17, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on AMD’s energy-slashing feat

AMD’s energy-slashing feat Heather Clancy Fri, 07/17/2020 – 01:00 It isn’t often I have the mindspace to proactively follow up on every commitment proclaimed by the companies I cover. But I recently paused to catch up about one that has particular relevance as more companies act to address their Scope 3 emissions reductions, those generated by supply chains and customers: AMD’s bold pledge back in 2014 to improve the energy efficiency of its mobile processors — the components used in notebook computers and specialized embedded systems, such as medical imaging equipment or industrial applications — by 25 times by 2020. Not-so-spoiler alert: The fact that I’m bringing it up should be a big hint that the company has delivered. In fact, AMD overachieved the goal, delivering a 31.7 times improvement with its new Ryzen 7 4800H processor. In layperson’s terms, that means that the chip consumes 84 percent energy, while taking 80 percent less compute time for certain tasks. For you and me, that means batteries last longer. For companies buying entire portfolios of devices based on these processors, they will see their electricity consumption reduced. (The specific reduction you’d see by upgrading 50,000 laptops would be 1.4 million kilowatt-hours.) Consider this perspective from tech research analyst Bob O’Donnell, president of TECHnalysis Research: “Lower energy consumption has never been more important for the planet, and the company’s ability to meet its target while also achieving strong processor performance is a great reflection of what a market-leading, engineering-focus company they’ve become.” Indeed, when I chatted with Susan Moore, AMD’s corporate vice president for corporate responsibility and government affairs, she told me it took “a full company focus and a lot of innovation” by the AMD engineering team to make the goal happen. Note to others attempting the same sort of thing. Although the company had pretty good visibility into what it would be able to pull off early on during the six-year period, there were plenty of questions marks, and it took unwavering support (and faith) from AMD CEO Lisa Su to keep true, Moore said.  Actually getting there took some very specific design changes, outlined in a blog by AMD Chief Technology Officer Mark Papermaster. Here are some of them: Investments in new semiconductor manufacturing processors (specifically 7 nanometer technology) Changes to the real-time power management algorithms The integration of the central processor and graphics architecture into a common “system on a chip” (among other architecture changes) Changes to the interconnections between the components (its proprietary approach for this is called the Infinity Fabric) Moore said close collaboration with customers (such as the original equipment manufacturers using AMD chips for their computers) was also critical. “A large part is the ability to sit down with likeminded organizations,” she noted.  Plus, disclosure. AMD decided to declare its progress year to year. (Here’s the report card from 2018, for an idea of how it shared the information.) “That was definitely a risk, but we thought it was very important that is was something that we talk about along the way, so we did measurements every year,” Moore said.  I wish every company were that transparent. Topics Information Technology Energy & Climate Energy Efficiency Featured Column Practical Magic Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Courtesy of AMD Close Authorship

Read the original:
AMD’s energy-slashing feat

Bill McDonough: We are here to make goods, not ‘bads’

February 7, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Bill McDonough: We are here to make goods, not ‘bads’

The legendary designer says it’s time to view the economy from the perspective of how much we can give for all we get.

Excerpt from:
Bill McDonough: We are here to make goods, not ‘bads’

TreeHugger Live from Austin: Watch #SxSWEco Video

October 4, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on TreeHugger Live from Austin: Watch #SxSWEco Video

We’re excited to be here in Austin, Texas for the inaugural SxSW Eco conference! Below is a video player where you can watch some of the panels and keynote speeches throughout the next three days. While not all of the conference will be streamed live, we’ll be busy bringing you our perspective live on Twitter and posting blog updates throughout the week. … Read the full story on TreeHugger

Excerpt from: 
TreeHugger Live from Austin: Watch #SxSWEco Video

From Scrap To Stylish Stump: Recycled Timber Furniture By Ubico Studio

October 4, 2011 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on From Scrap To Stylish Stump: Recycled Timber Furniture By Ubico Studio

Photos: Ubico Studio We admit it: we can’t get enough of stump-themed furniture. And now, from Tel Aviv-based Ubico Studio comes this tongue-in-cheek creation, made from salvaged wood scraps, glued together and skillfully shaped to give the appearance of wholesome stumpiness. … Read the full story on TreeHugger

Here is the original post: 
From Scrap To Stylish Stump: Recycled Timber Furniture By Ubico Studio

Trashy TV Takes On a Whole New Meaning

August 23, 2010 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Trashy TV Takes On a Whole New Meaning

Reality shows have taken over television, like a virus or a breath of fresh air, depending on your perspective.

The rest is here:
Trashy TV Takes On a Whole New Meaning

Incredible Underwater Photography of Breaking Waves by Alex Tipple

August 3, 2010 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Incredible Underwater Photography of Breaking Waves by Alex Tipple

Photo by Alex Tipple, via the Telegraph We thought wave photography had reached its pinnacle when we saw Clark Little’s colorful and dramatic images of cresting waves last year. But an equally creative and committed photographer has pushed the perspective and drug us underneath the crashing waves for a clear sight of what it looks like to be right there in the tumbling water

Originally posted here:
Incredible Underwater Photography of Breaking Waves by Alex Tipple

Friggebod Fun: MiniHouse From Add-A-Room

August 3, 2010 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Friggebod Fun: MiniHouse From Add-A-Room

Image via Onen So much of what we build is a response to regulation; from garden sheds to modular homes, it is the rules that define the forms. Swedish Housing Minister, Birgit Friggebo exempted buildings under 150 square feet from the building codes; Her name will live forever in the explosion of lovely little cabins that bear the name Friggebod. The latest we have seen is the Minihouse 1 from Add-a-Room , designed by Lars Frank Neilsen of OneN.

More here:
Friggebod Fun: MiniHouse From Add-A-Room

The Global Cooling Myth Debunked (Video)

August 3, 2010 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The Global Cooling Myth Debunked (Video)

Image via Space4Case Why do some climate skeptics continue to claim that the earth is in the middle of a ‘global cooling trend’ despite the fact that every reliable source — NASA, NCAR, NOAA, etc — has shown temperature records proving otherwise? Why do climate deniers seem to revere satellite data? And why do some skeptics still blame global warming on solar activity?

Continued here: 
The Global Cooling Myth Debunked (Video)

Keeping Things in Perspective: An Electric Car is About as Power-Hungry as an Air Conditioner

April 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Keeping Things in Perspective: An Electric Car is About as Power-Hungry as an Air Conditioner

Image on left: Nissan “EVs would come to an annual cost of between US$190 and $278 to consumers” There’s no doubt that a large number of electric vehicles would use a lot of electricity.

More here:
Keeping Things in Perspective: An Electric Car is About as Power-Hungry as an Air Conditioner

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1923 access attempts in the last 7 days.