Wild in Africa jewelry supports wildlife conservation charities

August 14, 2020 by  
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When National Geographic filmmaker Shannon Wild moved to Africa in 2013 to make wildlife documentaries, she found herself in the hospital after a near-death experience in Masai Mara. After pushing her body to the point of complete exhaustion for her career, she was medevaced to Nairobi and became bedridden for three months. Unable to even hold a camera initially, and with the knowledge that going back into the field would take months of stamina-building physical therapy, she started a grueling 6-month recovery period. Shannon had built up a collection of beaded bracelets throughout her travels, and one day, yearning for a creative outlet, she began dismantling and redesigning them. Using her past experience in graphic design and marketing, she was able to establish a business, Wild In Africa – Bracelets for Wildlife , to commemorate her healing journey and the love for animals and wildlife that brought her to Africa in the first place. Related: Make a statement with Serendipitous Project’s eco-friendly jewelry Today, Wild responsibly sources beads from all over the world and donates 50% of the purchase price of the Wild in Africa jewelry to 10 separate wildlife charities . The gender-neutral bracelets include a combination of stone beads, tribal charms and pendants that pay homage to the colors and textures found in the natural world. On the company’s website, the charity that each bracelet supports is outlined on the product’s page. It includes a general description of the organization’s values and goals, from bringing an end to the global rhino horn trade to conservation plans for Zambian carnivores. There is also a link to the charity so customers can learn more about where their contributions are going. The packaging is eco-friendly and recyclable , and materials are sustainably sourced. The company also offers a membership for first access to special, limited-edition bracelets and behind-the-scenes looks at featured charities. + Wild in Africa Images via Wild in Africa

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Rec Room presents ethically produced dresses for summer

July 21, 2020 by  
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Comfort, style, equality, sustainability — these values encapsulate the essence of Rec Room and its products, including a new line of ethically crafted summer dresses you’ll want to wear every single day. The company’s newest release is a line of versatile and comfy dresses, constructed with Italian-made fabric that is antimicrobial and wrinkle-resistant, making it a performance fabric that is machine-washable and quick-drying. It’s also a forgiving fabric for any type of lifestyle. It packs well thanks to the wrinkle-resistance. It’s also stain-resistant. Related: These funky sandals upcycle fabric from the cutting room floor The dress line, called Summer of Comfort, offers a variety of style options such as tank, slip, strap, tie and open back, all made with the same silky, breathable fabric. Rec Room is a business partnership — and friendship — between two women, Dre and Val. Although the company has many goals around clothing quality and sustainability, it also recognizes the racial injustices of the world. In response, it contributes 1% of gross sales to organizations working to eradicate systems of racial injustice, including The Equal Justice Initiative and The Loveland Foundation. Rec Room chose a production facility in California , so all products are made in the U.S. by the same company that produces athleticwear for the U.S. Olympics teams. With that in mind, it makes sense that each dress is breathable and stretchy, and, as the company says, “puts the leisure back in athleisure.” Both the manufacturing plant in California and the fabric manufacturer in Italy have earned high marks for employee wages, hours and work environment, as well as water management and low environmental impact. However, every business has to measure its carbon footprint, so even though it has made an effort to create a brand that ethically and sustainably produced, Rec Room also gives back to reforestation initiatives via 1% For the Planet and One Tree Planted. Customers can purchase additional carbon offsets directly through the company website. Rec Room Review Rec Room generously offered to send me a sample dress, which I eagerly accepted. I chose the tie dress in burgundy. For reference, I stand around 5’6” tall and weigh around 140 pounds, carrying most of my weight around my waist. I received a large and could likely have been comfortable in a medium, but the tie feature really allows me to tighten and loosen the fit to where I feel comfortable. The fabric is divine — breathable, stretchy, very soft and very comfortable to move in. It offers a luxurious feel without any concern for damaging it while wearing it during activities. I love that it is machine-washable and releases wrinkles nicely, even right out of the package. The dress I selected allowed me to play around with how to use the tie, creating quite different looks that made me feel confident. My favorite was criss-crossing it in the front; I also tried it with different jewelry . It’s very adaptable to dressing up and dressing down with a change from tall boots to sandals to Keds. I’m no model, but I’ve included a few candid shots to show how it fit my body type. Honestly, I rarely even wear dresses, but this is the most comfortable and versatile item of clothing in my closet and will likely sub in for times I would typically wear shorts or jeans. + Rec Room Images via Rec Room and Dawn Hammon / Inhabitat

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Rec Room presents ethically produced dresses for summer

Passively cooled Californian beach house channels Australian vibes

July 21, 2020 by  
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American architect Alec Petros has completed the Seaside Reef House, a timber-clad home that celebrates indoor/outdoor living at Solana Beach, California. Designed for Australian clients, the beach house takes cues from the Australian vernacular with its breezy, coastal appearance. Sustainability was also emphasized in the design, which features FSC-certified cedar and passive cooling strategies . Petros gained the commission after a serendipitous meeting with the client at a local bookstore, where the two coincidentally picked up the same architecture book and struck up a conversation that revealed a shared design aesthetic. The challenge with the project was not only the site’s odd shape but also the client’s desires for maximized ocean views and an open floor plan while preserving a sense of privacy in the densely populated coastal area. Related: A Brisbane cottage is sustainably updated to gracefully age in place As a result, Petros strategically placed a floor-to-ceiling door system and large windows to capture ocean views and cooling cross-breezes along the western and southern facades instead of wrapping the entire building in glass. To further emphasize the indoor/outdoor connection, Petros included deep roof eaves that measure 7 feet in length and a natural materials palette. The open-plan layout and interior pocket door systems help maintain sight lines and ensure flexibility for long-term use. “Another strong detail in the thought process behind the design related to sustainability,” Petros explained in a design statement. “The siding is composed of vertical FSC-certified cedar boards attached to a horizontal sleeper system, which created an air gap between the siding and the water-proofing. This allows sunlight to heat the boards without transferring a majority of that heat into the building itself. The beauty of this design is that it reduces the energy usage on the house where cooling is considered.” The wood siding was also selected for its ability to age gracefully in the humid, coastal region. + Alec Petros Studio Images via Alec Petros Studio

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Passively cooled Californian beach house channels Australian vibes

These sustainable shoes by Rackle are made from hemp

May 11, 2020 by  
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What better way to put your best eco-friendly foot forward than with a stylish, comfortable pair of sustainable shoes? Rackle, a Boston-based footwear brand, is on a mission to create sustainable shoes, starting with the release of its hemp-based Alex line. The unisex Alex sneakers come in three color options that include redwood, natural and blue. Weighing in at only 6 ounces, these shoes are better suited for leisure and errands than athletics, but they still offer a supportive, tri-density foam sole with EcoPure foam that aids in biodegradation and a hemp-based upper material. Each pair comes with two sets of laces — solid and checkered — each of which are made from a combination of hemp and 100% recycled materials. The shoes aim to meld style, versatility and sustainability. Related: Good Clothing releases capsule collection made from hemp and organic cotton “Rackle uses innovative plant-based materials, such as industrial hemp, in our products,” said Joe Napurano, senior designer for Rackle. “We also incorporated a special foam sole technology that promotes biodegradation. Once your shoes have completed their life of providing you style and comfort, we’ll help you find a home for them through our non-profit partners, or should you discard, they are designed to breakdown in just one year under active enclosed landfill conditions.” Choosing hemp was a calculated decision. It grows faster than cotton yet requires a fraction of the water to grow. Plus, it is antimicrobial and is a durable and washable material. Hemp is a sustainable product that has become popular in the shoe industry because of its eco-friendliness and the ease with which it converts into a strong fiber. According the company’s website, “The 100% sustainable hemp upper is made of high grade hemp and provides year-round comfort and support thanks to the plant’s natural benefits: cool in the summer and warm in the winter; anti-microbial; lightweight; water-resistant; UV-resistant; and extremely durable.” + Rackle Images via Rackle

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These sustainable shoes by Rackle are made from hemp

Intergravity launches sustainable clothing that reduces the need to do laundry

March 9, 2020 by  
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An exciting trend is hitting the fashion market, and it’s not about the coolest design or newest fad — it’s about corporate responsibility and sustainable practices. There are companies who believe fashion can be eco-friendly, ethical and affordable, and this Kickstarter campaign for sustainable, anti-bacterial clothing by Intergravity is the perfect example of this mindset. The company started out as a design and production house aimed at helping start-up designers build their collections. Along the way, it discovered a desire to make a clothing line that was long-lasting and eco-friendly, so the team evaluated every step in the operation and made every improvement they could think of. Related: Designer Dana Cohen creates unique, recycled fabric garments Intergravity begins its process by making its own fabric in-house. This way, it can control waste and production resources, such as water and electricity. All clothing is made from organic cotton, recycled polyester, Lenzing Ecovera and Tencel. Any leftover fabric will be donated to make cuff gloves for people who are at high-risk of being exposed to bacteria (e.g. street cleaners and janitors). All garments are produced by a small, family-run factory with a staff comprised of 80% women. Workers receive 15-20% of each garment’s price and are guaranteed a fair wage. To ensure the clothing meets the highest standards for eco-friendly practices, it is OEKO Tex 100 Standard, Bluesign and Global Organic Textile Standard certified. Intergravity’s focus is not only on conservation during production but also during the life of the garment. With this in mind, it coats products with Polygiene, an anti-bacterial and odor-control treatment. With the knowledge that cutting back on washing and drying clothing consumes less resources, Intergravity clothing can be worn longer between washings, saving time, money, water and electricity over the life of the garment. Each design factors in a wide size range to suit a variety of body types and includes an adjustable fit in shirts. Quality stitching, copious pockets and functional design round out the reasons to hold on to each garment for the long-haul rather than subscribing to fast fashion . To further its goal of protecting the Earth, Intergravity has joined 1% For the Planet as a way of giving back. At the time of writing, the campaign is nearly fully funded. If it achieves its goal, Intergravity is scheduling shipments for June 2020. + Intergravity Images via Intergravity

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Intergravity launches sustainable clothing that reduces the need to do laundry

Everlane introduces long-lasting outerwear made from recycled water bottles

November 12, 2018 by  
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The ReNew outerwear line, launched in late October by Everlane , has yanked three million water bottles out of the waste stream and turned them into fibers for the venture. The new collection offers cleaner fashion in an industry known for heavy pollution and resource consumption. This first round of renewed clothing includes four fleece pullover options, six puffer jackets and three parkas. While other companies have edged toward the trend of incorporating recycled materials into their production, Everlane is taking it a step further. Everlane has vowed to eliminate all virgin plastic from its manufacturing processes by 2021 and instead will rely 100 percent on recycled materials . Furthermore, the company will eliminate all single-use plastics from corporate offices and retail store locations. It has also committed to the use of recycled bags when shipping merchandise. The commitment is a firm one, as evidenced by the process involved to turn plastic into usable fibers. First, the facility receives large bales of compressed plastic bottles that are sorted using a combination of human and machine efforts. After sorting, the bottles are ground down into tiny flakes and subsequently melted into molten plastic. Next, that plastic is sent through a machine that turns it into long strands and then dices the strands into crystals. Once they arrive at the spinning facility, those crystals are melted down once again, turned into thread and spun into yarn for fabrics. Related: Clothing made from recycled water bottles highlights the ongoing crisis in Flint In addition to the ReNew line aimed at conscientious material sourcing, Everlane offers sustainability with the goal for its products to last for decades. This is in steep contrast to many textile industry business plans that market trendy and disposable clothing to encourage consumers to constantly purchase the newest, flash-in-the-pan item. In addition, the company demands fair trade practices from the factories it works with and believes in ethical treatment of employees. In fact, all Black Friday profits are returned to the employees in some fashion. As a case in point, the 2018 profits are earmarked to build an organic farm on the campus of a facility in Vietnam, a country with otherwise excessive pesticide use that pollutes the food supply. + Everlane Via Treehugger Images via Everlane

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