7,000 methane gas bubbles in Siberia on the verge of exploding

March 22, 2017 by  
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Last summer researchers revealed crazy bubbling tundra in Siberia in a surreal video. Scientists believe the weird phenomenon is caused by methane released by melting permafrost . Now around 7,000 of those bubbles are getting ready to explode. The bursts could result in small potholes – or large craters . Researchers uncovered 15 bubbles causing the ground to lurch like a waterbed on Bely Island in Siberia last summer. Then scientists found around 7,000 more bubbles on the Gydan and Yamal peninsulas. Yamal Department for Science and Innovation director Alexey Titovsky recently told The Siberian Times, “With time the bubble explodes, releasing gas. This is how gigantic funnels form.” Related: Insane video shows Siberian ground bubbling like a “wobbling waterbed” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06Xc3LtZRWo Scientists think the mysterious craters – or funnels – are connected to climate change . They think when permafrost melts, it releases methane, which causes eruptions that then result in craters. That’s the theory, anyway – Titovsky said they’re continuing to research the bubbles. He told The Siberian Times, “We need to know which bumps are dangerous and which are not. Scientists are working on detecting and structuring signs of potential threat, like the maximum height of a bump and pressure that the earth can withstand.” According to The Siberian Times, scientists are making a map of Yamal’s underground gas bubbles, which could threaten infrastructure and transport in what the publication described as a key energy production region. The Russian Academy of Science’s Ural branch also connected thawing permafrost with the phenomenon. A spokesperson told The Siberian Times of the bubbles, “Their appearance at such high latitudes is most likely linked to thawing permafrost which is in turn linked to overall rise of temperature on the north of Eurasia during the last several decades. An abnormally warm summer in 2016 on the Yamal peninsula must have added to the process.” Researchers Dorothee Ehrich and Alexander Sokolov punctured one of the 15 bubbles found last year, and found the air escaping from the bumps included 20 times more carbon dioxide and 200 times more methane than nearby air, according to EcoWatch. Via EcoWatch and The Siberian Times Images via screenshot ( 1 , 2 )

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7,000 methane gas bubbles in Siberia on the verge of exploding

Dramatic disintegration of Canada permafrost threatens huge carbon release

March 3, 2017 by  
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Permafrost , or frozen soil , is rapidly collapsing across a 52,000 square mile area in northwest Canada – about the size of the entire state of Alabama. New research from the Northwest Territories Geological Survey (NTGS) finds the permafrost thaw is intensifying, a dramatic disintegration that could speed up climate change . When these slabs of Arctic permafrost collapse, they send silt and mud rich in carbon into waterways. The research shows the decay is resulting in landslides that could alter large swaths of landscape. Similar phenomenon have been noted in Scandinavia, Siberia, and Alaska. The new study sought to measure permafrost decay in Canada using satellite images and other data – and Steven Kokelj of NTGS, lead author of a paper published in February by Geology , said “things have really taken off” in the face of climate change. Scientists from universities in New Zealand and Canada also contributed to the research. Related: Alaskan permafrost could melt in the next 55 years, says world’s leading expert The scientists observed permafrost disintegrating in 40- to 60-mile stretches of the terrain, revealing “extensive landscapes [that] remain poised for climate-driven change.” Other research has suggested thawing permafrost could lead to the collapse of coastlines or creation of new lakes or valleys. All that silt and mud could affect fish and other species living in the waterways, limiting development of aquatic plants, but scientists still need to determine how exactly this added mud might impact fish. Also up for debate is how quickly the carbon in melted permafrost becomes carbon dioxide (CO2). Scientist Suzanne Tank of the University of Alberta told InsideClimate News the carbon in permafrost becomes coarse particles that don’t become CO2 right away. But Swedish researchers conducted a study suggesting soil particles are in fact converted rapidly to CO2 when the soil is carried along to the sea. Via InsideClimate News Images via Wikimedia Commons and U.S. Geological Survey on Flickr

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Dramatic disintegration of Canada permafrost threatens huge carbon release

5 deadly diseases caused by global warming

August 24, 2016 by  
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Modern science has prevented deadly diseases ranging from tetanus to polio, but man-made global warming could unravel our collective progress as new deadly diseases emerge as a result of climate change. We’ve rounded up a list of five deadly diseases below. That said, it’s important to note the spread of new deadly diseases could potentially be prevented if the world would listen to warnings from atmospheric scientists and do everything humanly possible to mitigate climate change . ANTHRAX Out of control methane pouring into the atmosphere is not the only concern from the thawing Siberian permafrost. As global warming melts the permafrost, deadly diseases lying dormant for hundreds or thousands of years could be unleashed, quickly spreading to livestock and humans. A preview of this emerging threat came as recently as July 2016 when a 75-year-old reindeer carcass became unfrozen from soaring temperatures, causing the first anthrax outbreak since 1941. The outbreak killed more than 2,000 reindeer and sickened 13 people in Siberia. Related: Zombie anthrax outbreak hits Siberia after blistering heatwave ZIKA With temperatures rising in higher latitudes, diseases once confined to the tropics are now traveling far from the equator to the United States and other parts of the world not used to dealing with mosquito-borne diseases like Zika . Mosquitos carrying the virus have already crossed the U.S. border and are spreading across South Florida, creating a public health emergency. The National Institutes of Health’s Anthony Fauci recently warned that Texas and Louisiana could be next for Zika. “As we get continued warming, it’s going to become more difficult to control mosquitoes,” Andrew Monaghan, an atmospheric scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., recently told The New York Times. “The warmer it is, the faster they can develop from egg to adult, and the faster they can incubate viruses.” Related: Zika outbreak declared in Miami Beach ZOMBIE DISEASES There could be other deadly viruses safely frozen for now underneath the permafrost. But as the permafrost continues to thaw from global warming, Neanderthal viruses, smallpox or other ancient illnesses could become released into the environment again after laying dormant for thousands of years. In 2015, researchers discovered a giant virus buried in the permafrost for 30,000 years that was still infectious, although the virus only infects amoebas and isn’t dangerous to humans. However, there could be other viruses harmful to humans lurking underneath the permafrost. Neanderthals and humans both lived in Siberia as recently as 28,000 years ago and there is a chance that some of the diseases that plagued both species could still be around. TICK-BORNE ILLNESS Ticks are another disease transmitter like mosquitos that will likely migrate to new regions and become more active as the climate changes and summers became longer and hotter. Babesiosis is a tick-borne disease that has been increasing in the United States. The protozoan infection is mostly found in the Northeast and upper Midwest. In 2011, more than 1,100 cases of babesiosis from 15 states were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Lyme disease is another tick-borne illness that could move northward if global warming is allowed to continue unabated. The tick that carries Lyme is the American blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis), otherwise known as deer tick. According to the Minnesota Department of Health, the incidence of Lyme disease in the state has been increasing in recent years, an indication that deer ticks are migrating north. Related: How a Bite from This Tick is Turning Some People into Vegetarians CHOLERA Deadly cholera outbreaks could increase with climate change because the bacterial disease that causes severe diarrhea and dehydration is attracted to warm weather and warm water. The disease spreads through contaminated water and cholera could increase in developing countries with poor sanitation that are on the front lines of climate change. Extreme heat and intense storms caused by climate change could lead to flooding that spreads contaminated water. Cholera kills more than 100,000 people globally every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “I would put cholera highest on my list to worry about with respect to climate change,” Dr. David M. Morens, senior advisor to the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told Think Progress . “Cholera likes warm weather, so the warmer the Earth gets and the warmer the water gets, the more it’s going to like it. Climate change will likely make cholera much worse.” Via Live Science Images via YouTube , Public Domain  and Wikimedia

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5 deadly diseases caused by global warming

Scientists conclude that permafrost melting may not be as devastating as predicted

May 14, 2015 by  
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Earth’s permafrost is thawing and the consequences for the planet are concerning. Scientists estimate that 1,330 billion to 1,580 billion tons of organic carbon are stored within the permanently frozen soil of the Arctic and subarctic regions. As the Earth’s temperature increases, the previously frozen soil releases its long-trapped greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. This creates a positive feedback loop, in which these gases then further warm the climate, which then melts more permafrost, and so on. Over the past thirty years, the Arctic has warmed twice as fast as other regions and its thawing permafrost could accelerate the effects of climate change. While scientists have been aware of this cycle for quite some time, researchers have recently clarified how the powerful destabilizing effect of melting permafrost will unfold. In short, it could be worse. Read the rest of Scientists conclude that permafrost melting may not be as devastating as predicted Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Arctic , arctic permafrost , arctic thaw , arctic thawing , Climate Change , climate change research , effects of climate change , global warming , global warming permafrost , permafrost

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Scientists conclude that permafrost melting may not be as devastating as predicted

Remote Alaskan town is the canary in the US climate change coal mine

December 17, 2014 by  
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The town of Shishmaref, Alaska lies on an island 30 miles south of the Arctic Circle and next to the Chukchi Sea. Its residents, Native Alaskan Inupiaq people, can really see Russia from their house! However, the rapidly changing climate, which  is changing faster in Alaska  than anywhere else in the nation, is keeping the Chukchi Sea from freezing as early as it used to – leaving the shoreline exposed to fall and winter storms. It’s also melting the permafrost upon which the town’s nearly 600 residents have built their homes, and the island is eroding as the permafrost melts. Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Read the rest of Remote Alaskan town is the canary in the US climate change coal mine Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alaska , Alaska warming , Climate Change , coastal erosion , global warming , infrastructure , permafrost , permafrost melting , Shishmaref , urban development

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Remote Alaskan town is the canary in the US climate change coal mine

Canada’s Toxic “Dumpcano” Finally Extinguished After Four Months

September 18, 2014 by  
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A dump fire that has been burning for nearly four months in the remote northern Canadian city of Iqaluit has finally been extinguished. The “Dumpcano” as it has been known locally has been spewing toxic fumes into the town’s air, forcing residents indoors over the summer months due to the short- and long-term health risks of the smoke. The fire began when garbage in the four-story pile spontaneously combusted, forming a molten core that at times burned at temperatures of 500 degrees Celsius. The incident has highlighted the difficulties of managing waste materials in an environment that is frozen solid for around nine months of the year. Read the rest of Canada’s Toxic “Dumpcano” Finally Extinguished After Four Months Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Air quality , canada , Dumpcano , fire , garbage dump , garbage separation , human waste , Iqaluit , Iqaluit Dumpcano extinguished , Nunavut , permafrost , public health , recycling , toxic fumes , toxic smoke , waste disposal , waste treatment

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Canada’s Toxic “Dumpcano” Finally Extinguished After Four Months

British Columbia’s First Earthship Built with Pop Cans and Old Tires is Still Standing Strong!

September 18, 2014 by  
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In July 2009, Sandra Burkholder and her family began building an  Earthship  in Kamloops, BC;  a  sustainable house  built with used tires and pop cans. Known as the  Darfield Earthship , the home features green building methods, water conservation, organic growing techniques, and renewable energy. In 2011, this inspiring project won $5,000 in the So Nice “A Better Organic World” contest, and both the home and its  surrounding gardens  have been evolving beautifully ever since. Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Read the rest of British Columbia’s First Earthship Built with Pop Cans and Old Tires is Still Standing Strong! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: darfield earthship , earthship , Eco Architecture , eco design , gray water , graywater , green architecture , green design , green home , grey water , greywater , Home Made from Old Tires and Pop Cans , hugelkultur , low impact , low impact house , low impact living , old tires , perennial , perennial garden , perennials , permaculture , permaculture gardening , raised garden beds , rammed earth , recycled home , Recycled Materials , Sandra Burkholder , sustainable design , sustainable permaculture , tires

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British Columbia’s First Earthship Built with Pop Cans and Old Tires is Still Standing Strong!

Melting Permafrost Changes the Landscape and Way of Life in Alaska

March 28, 2014 by  
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At one point, permanently-frozen ground, or permafrost , covered nearly 1/4 of the land on Earth — but that’s changing as global warming is melting the ice and changing the landscape in places like Siberia , Arctic Canada, and Alaska. Generations of ice, some of it hundreds of thousands of years old or more, has started slowly softening over the past 30 years. Now, roads, houses, and entire towns constructed in years past are collapsing and being ripped apart by the shifting earth. Read the rest of Melting Permafrost Changes the Landscape and Way of Life in Alaska Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alaska , carbon , Climate Change , climate refugees , collapsed buildings , destroyed roads , Disaster Relief , greenhouse gasses , houses on stilts , melting permafrost , methane , natural disasters , permafrost , public infrastructure , Sustainable Building , thermal raft        

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Melting Permafrost Changes the Landscape and Way of Life in Alaska

Geo-physicist Tries to Recreate an Ice Age Ecosystem in Siberia to Prevent the Release of 500 Billion Tons of CO2

January 2, 2012 by  
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Located south of Chersky in the Sakha Republic in northeastern Siberia is an expansive pocket of more than 500 billion tons of methane – more greenhouse gas than man has made since the Industrial Revolution. Permafrost has trapped the gases in the soil for the last 10,000 years, but over the last few decades, global warming has caused the permafrost to melt, allowing gas from the carbon rich soil to seep into the atmosphere. Scientists believe if the permafrost continues to melt, in just even 100 years, a cloud of noxious gas could overtake the Earth, causing catastrophic results for both the climate and global agriculture. However, Russian geo-physicist  Sergei Zimov has come up with an effective way to mitigate disaster, and he’s doing it by recreating the last ice age across 160 sq km of Siberian “desert”, a project he calls the Pleistocene Park . Read the rest of Geo-physicist Tries to Recreate an Ice Age Ecosystem in Siberia to Prevent the Release of 500 Billion Tons of CO2 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: arctic green house gases , biomimicry , Chersky , Climate Change , global climate change , global warming , green house gas in the arctic , ice age siberia , permafrost , permafrost and global warming , Pleistocene Park , recreating the ice age , Sakha Republic , Sergei Zimov , siberia , soberian ice age , stopping climate change

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Geo-physicist Tries to Recreate an Ice Age Ecosystem in Siberia to Prevent the Release of 500 Billion Tons of CO2

Yoyogi Village Features a Lush Interior Vertical Garden in Tokyo

January 2, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Yoyogi Village Features a Lush Interior Vertical Garden in Tokyo Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “living wall” , code kurkku , containers , Daylighting , green garden , Japan , lounge , music bar , shinichi osawa , takeshi kobayashi , Tokyo , urban development , urban retreat , vertical garden , wonderwall , yoyogi village

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Yoyogi Village Features a Lush Interior Vertical Garden in Tokyo

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