Breezy Ecuadorian brick home on stilts embraces cool tropical winds

August 7, 2018 by  
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Ecuadorian architecture firm Natura Futura Arquitectura has completed the Stilts House, an elevated brick home that opens up to the outdoors with a perforated facade. Located in General Villamil, a coastal canton of the province of Guayas, the Stilts House celebrates the UNESCO-recognized region’s superb climate and culture of great craftsmanship through its site-specific design. Built of local natural materials and concrete, the home spans 1,722 square feet across two floors. Named after its system of teak pillars, the Stilts House includes three bedrooms, three bathrooms, a kitchenette, dining area, an enclosed outdoor courtyard , hammock space and two living areas, one on each floor. The main living spaces of the brick home, including the hammock area, are placed on the first floor, and the secondary living area and the bedrooms are located above. To tie the residence into its surroundings, the architects used locally sourced materials including traditional baked bricks laid in a pattern that allows ventilation; no glass was used. Related: This weekend home in Mexico blends in with the forest landscape “On the ground floor, and integrated with the outside and their day-to-day activities, there is a social area that closes in on itself, and opens toward the interior of the house as a rest area with hammocks ,” said Natura Futura Arquitectura in its project statement. “This will generate micro-climates, through the material and its new features.” Timber shutters and sliding doors provide additional privacy and can be easily opened up to connect the interior with the outdoors. + Natura Futura Arquitectura Images via JAG Studio

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Breezy Ecuadorian brick home on stilts embraces cool tropical winds

Lego-like kindergarten sparks creativity with a playful brick facade

May 17, 2018 by  
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Brick may often be seen as boring and traditional, but that’s not the case when the material falls into the hands of KIENTRUC O . The Vietnamese architecture studio creatively used the ancient building block to breathe life into Ho Chi Minh City’s new Chuon Chuon Kim 2 Kindergarten located in the city’s District 2. The building is made entirely from bare brick arranged in patterns to form an eye-catching and playful facade that also promotes natural ventilation. Likened to a “giant Lego building,” the Chuon Chuon Kim 2 Kindergarten features perforated brick walls with sections painted vibrant yellow for a spectacular effect. While a playful atmosphere conducive to exploration was crucial in the design, the architects also wanted to create a space that felt calm and relaxed. To that end, the building is organized around a central active core that branches out to serene  classroom settings. “Instilled within the school is an openness with a spark of curiosity that allows people of all ages to venture and explore the space in a relaxing and calming atmosphere,” the architects wrote. “As we have engaged in numerous educational projects, we recognize that these experiences are equally as important as the responsibility of nurturing the kids. It invokes a sense of pride, and interests within the teacher and the staffs. It inspires and embraces them, for they have chosen to dedicate their life for the education and the well-being of the children on a daily basis.” Related: This stunning brick “cave house” in Vietnam is open to the elements Each floor features alternating patterns that encourages children to become more attuned to their surroundings. The walls are punctuated by large windows for continuous views inside and out. Access to daylight , cross breezes and a natural material palette help promote a healthful environment. A rooftop garden tops the building with panoramic views of the Saigon River. + KIENTRUC O Via ArchDaily Images by Hiroyuki Oki

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Lego-like kindergarten sparks creativity with a playful brick facade

The all-natural ‘Wellness Kitchen’ includes a beautiful living herb wall

May 17, 2018 by  
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Kitchens are often the heart of any home, and now an innovative company is giving our beloved cooking space a healthy and sustainable makeover. Interior design company  Finch London recently unveiled its beautiful bespoke rose-colored “Wellness Kitchen” that’s built with various chemical-free and eco-friendly materials  and features a stunning herb wall. The London-based company’s Wellness Kitchen — which recently took home the grand prize at the Grand Designs Live event for its spectacular design — offers a glimpse into the future of eco-friendly kitchen design . The space includes a number of wellness features such as incandescent Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) light bulbs, a doTerra essential oil diffuser, a steam oven, an alkaline water purifier and much more. The countertops are made of Jesmonite, a water-based material that, unlike cast concrete, does not release volatile organic compounds . Related: Artisan Moss ‘plant paintings’ are maintenance-free alternatives to living walls The flooring is made from natural cork  harvested through an environmentally-friendly process. Resistant to dust and toxic absorption, cork is an ideal choice for people who suffer from allergies. It’s also antimicrobial and water-resistant, which helps to combat mold. A major feature of the kitchen is its verdant living herb wall installed on the kitchen island. In addition to various air-purifying plants found hanging throughout the space, the indoor herb garden allows homeowners to grow their own herbs and spices organically. + Finch London Via Household Beautiful Images via Finch London

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The all-natural ‘Wellness Kitchen’ includes a beautiful living herb wall

New Feyenoord sports center has a perforated facade made from weathered steel

June 1, 2017 by  
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A perforated weathered steel envelope shelters the interior of the new Feynoord Training Complex in Rotterdam , providing privacy and daylight for players and staff. Moederscheim Moonen Architects designed the complex as a new landmark for the city which will house various medical and wellness facilities, changing rooms for players, hospitality spaces and an auditorium. Offering facilities in line with the needs of a modern football club, the Feynoord Training Complex will be realized in a sub-area of the new Stadionpark district in Rotterdam as part of a larger masterplan . The building opens up towards two football pitches, while its rear facade “turns its back” to the public road. This provides privacy while enabling as much transparency and interaction as possible between the fields and the building. Related: Zigzagging Het Anker community center in the Netherlands is partially buried underground A sharply delineated facade doubles as a pronounced roof overhang . This element is made up of trapezium-shaped, expanded weathering steel panels with varying degrees of perforation . A red hue referencing the club’s distinctive colors reinforces the unique Feyenoord atmosphere. + Moederscheim Moonen Architects

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New Feyenoord sports center has a perforated facade made from weathered steel

This stunning vintage Airstream is a Scandinavian design dream come true

June 1, 2017 by  
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We always love a great Airstream conversion , and this Scandinavian-inspired renovation is making us green with design envy. Natasha Lawyer and Brett Bashaw renovated the vintage 1971 Airstream Sovereign by implementing simple, but gorgeous design principles inspired by Scandinavian functionality. Using white walls and semi-minimalistic decor, the tiny 200-square-feet space is now a beautiful home the couple affectionately calls their “ Tin Can Homestead .” The adventurous couple are no strangers to breathing life into vintage vehicles. Before buying the old airstream, they converted a 1978 Volkswagen van into a livable camper to travel around the country. Once that trip was over, they had been permanently bitten by the tiny home living bug and decided to buy the 1971 Airstream, which gave them more living space. After one year of renovations and restorations, they now have a beautiful 200-square-foot home with an amazing interior. Related: 7 retro-chic Airstream renovations The Tin Can Homestead is a stunning example of Airstream conversion done right. The renovation process as well as the interior design was inspired by Scandinavian design, meaning that the process focused on custom-made furniture and a clean, clutter-free design. The result is a living space that is light and airy, but doesn’t take itself too seriously. All-white walls and ceilings open up the interior, which is enhanced with fun hints of colors, warm wood tones, and personal knick-knacks from the couple’s travels. The couple’s most prized possession – besides their two little dogs – is a patterned daybed mattress that adds a hint of “bohemian eclectic glam” to the interior design . The kitchen design is an enviable space thanks to its clutter-free layout and simple black-and-white tiled backsplash. The bedroom is also a warm space, with a king-size bed that is big enough for 6-foot tall Bashaw. The camper is equipped with plenty of storage and various hanging plants around the home also enhance the healthy, airy atmosphere. Although the transformation resulted in a beautifully mellow space, the conversion process was anything but uncomplicated. When asked about the hardest part of the process, Lawyer said that building furniture to fit around the airstream’s curves presented quite the challenge, “Never again will I build furniture to fit inside what is basically a Twinkie.” Such a dreamy day in Seattle today so I threw open all the windows and did a little planting. A post shared by tin can homestead (@tincanhomestead) on May 3, 2017 at 4:30pm PDT The couple recently sold the home to a new family, but you can check out tons of dreamy photos of the Tin Can Homestead on their Instagram page. + Tin Can Homestead Via Apartment Therapy

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This stunning vintage Airstream is a Scandinavian design dream come true

Korean barista creates incredible works of latte art

June 1, 2017 by  
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Latte art is nothing new; your favorite barista at the local coffee shop probably serves up drinks adorned with hearts or flowers. But Korean barista Kangbin Lee’s latte art, which he calls creamart, will totally blow your mind. From Vincent van Gogh’s Starry Night to Disney-inspired pieces, these pieces of art look far too beautiful to drink. Lee, owner of Cafe C.Through in South Korea, has been a barista for 10 years. He says he’s never had any training in drawing, but that didn’t stop him from creating stunning latte art. You might be suspicious there was some Photoshop involved, but Lee demonstrates how he creates his art in the video below. Related: Artist paints stunning leaf art from leftover coffee grinds and stains Lee actually paints the colors on with a small spoon, using the foam as a backdrop and a color in many pieces. A metal stir stick allows him to add smaller details or blend colors. My Modern Met noted the process is remarkably similar to conventional painting . In another method of his latte art, Lee adds the pigments to the foam first before pouring it out over a cup of coffee to create colorful swirling shapes. #Rainbowlatteart . . . . . . . . #??? #cthrough #????? #?????? #???? #?????? #?????? #??? #????? #??? #????? #????? #???? #???? #????? #latteartporn #dailyart #coffee #barista #baristalife #latte #latteart #baristadaily #cafelatte #coffeetime #creamart #espresso #artwork A post shared by ??? (@leekangbin91) on May 18, 2017 at 4:48pm PDT In an Instagram post Lee said creamart is cold coffee, but that the taste doesn’t change as time passes. He’s as serious about coffee as he is about art and said taste is important to him. According to UPROXX , the artist uses espresso, chocolate sauce, and food coloring to create the works of art – so they’re entirely edible. He said customers always say they’ll never be able to drink the works of art but eventually doing just that. Lee is working to share his art with the world and has also started giving classes in creamart. + Kangbin Lee Via My Modern Met Images via leekangbin91 on Instagram

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Korean barista creates incredible works of latte art

Natural ventilation and light filters through this glittering perforated facade

February 17, 2017 by  
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Photo by W Workspace The natural environment permeates through the faceted,  perforated facade of this shopping center in Bankok. Taiwan-based studio Architectkidd designed the project, named The Street Ratchada, by renovating an existing retail development and combining Thailand’s traditional metalwork techniques with digital design to create an engaging envelope that allows air and light to filter through the porous diamond panels. The building features a semi-outdoor atrium , a variety of programs and public activities that help embed the project into the existing urban tissue of Bangkok . Traditionally planned interior gave way to a more flexible layout. Related: Architectkidd’s Blue Bird Hut saves injured birds in Thailand One of the building’s most prominent features is its facade which creates an inviting glow from within at night. Gradient transparencies of the panels facilitate natural ventilation and ever-changing lighting conditions. The metallic surface has a monumental appearance, while delicately influencing the use of the building by functioning as a porous layer composed of triangulated, uniquely cut slivers. + Architectkidd Lead photo by Luke Yeung

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Natural ventilation and light filters through this glittering perforated facade

Green-roofed gallery in Hanoi lights up like a lantern at night

November 29, 2016 by  
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This green-roofed gallery and lighting showroom in Hanoi is wrapped in a layer of perforated terracotta that filters sunlight into the narrow, tall volume of the building. Natural materials and different patterns and textures, trademarks of Vo Trong Nghia Architects , turn the building into a beautiful combination of traditional Vietnamese architecture and contemporary design. The building is located within Dong Da district in Hanoi. Its interior spaces are organized around a central void that houses a staircase which provides glances of the exhibitions. The terracotta blocks, traditionally used in Vietnamese architecture , facilitate natural ventilation and provide shade from harsh sunlight. These affordable building elements are coupled with a bespoke fixing system, enabling quick and simple assembly. Related: Lush green rooftop terrace invites homeowners outdoors in the foothills of Vietnam The top floor, where the gallery is located, overlooks a large neighboring tree and receives additional lighting through skylights that expose the roof garden above. While the building is in shade during the day, its internal nighttime illumination makes it look like a beautiful lantern. + Vo Trong Nghia Architects Via Archdaily Photos by Hiroyuki Oki , Trieu Chien

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Green-roofed gallery in Hanoi lights up like a lantern at night

A beautiful perforated facade filters natural light into this office building in Rio de Janeiro

November 4, 2016 by  
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The open-plan floors of the building are supported by concrete waffle slabs, peripheral columns and load-bearing walls. All the installations and structural elements are distributed along the perimeter of the building. Related: Tivoli Eco Residences Leave a Light Footprint on the Coast of Northern Brazil The facade of the building comprises three different layers-a lattice of perforated aluminium, a green buffer and soundproof windows. It semi-transparent quality allows natural light into the interior and is aided by a large skylight . The library is separated by glass partitions that filter in daylight. + Bernardes Arquitetura Via Archdaily Photos by Leonardo Finotti

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A beautiful perforated facade filters natural light into this office building in Rio de Janeiro

Schmidt Hammer Lassen transformed a boring office building into a vibrant high-tech startup incubator

September 22, 2016 by  
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The incubator is located in the the CaoHeJing Hi-Tech Park, a high-tech industrial development zone in Shanghai. It was developed as a pilot project of a series of shared office developments meant to nurture innovation in the field of technology. Related: Renovated Paris Rail Station Will House 1000 Start-Ups! The architects overclad the existing facade and wrapped the building in an aluminum skin coated with corrugated and perforated polyester powder. The new envelope provides insulation and shading to every workspace, while allowing optimal amount of natural light to reach the interior. The design team also introduced a central atrium that facilitates visual connections between the workspaces and encourages collaboration. A mural designed by Shanghai based graffiti artist, The Orange Blowfish, adorns the walls of the incubator. + Schmidt Hammer Lassen architects Photos by Peter Dixie and Leiii Zhang

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Schmidt Hammer Lassen transformed a boring office building into a vibrant high-tech startup incubator

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