The UN just passed a historic treaty banning nuclear weapons worldwide

July 10, 2017 by  
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Could world peace be on the horizon? Last Friday the United Nations passed a total ban on nuclear weapons in an attempt to prevent WWIII from breaking out. The 10-page document, entitled Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons , was inspired after the U.N. reopened discussion of a global nuclear ban in March of 2017, prompting 2,500 scientists from 7 countries to sign a petition urging nuclear disarmament. Now that the first-of-its-kind ban has passed, some are optimistic for a world in which the threat of nuclear war no longer exists. In a press briefing last Thursday, U.N. conference president Elayne Whyte Gomez said, “We are on the verge of adopting the treaty on the prohibition of nuclear weapons . She added, “This will be a historic moment and it will be the first multilateral nuclear disarmament treaty to be concluded in more than 20 years. The world has been waiting for this legal norm for 70 years.” TIME reports that more than 120 countries are prepared to adopt the treaty. The United States, Russia, Britain, France, China, India, Pakistan, and North Korea, on the other hand, are boycotting the initiative – supposedly because they are armed with nuclear weapons. In fact, the handful of countries has suggested strengthening the nearly 50-year-old Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty which gives only the U.S., Russia, Britain, France and China (the five original nuclear powers) the right to keep their destructive arsenal. Related: Climate change threat is as serious as nuclear war, UK minister warns Despite this, 122 member states voted in favor of negotiating “a legally-binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons.” North Korea was the only nation that did not participate in the voting. Singapore abstained, the Netherlands voted against the decision and eight other nations voted yes . In a joint statement , the U.S., Britain, and France wrote: “We do not intend to sign, ratify or ever become party to it.” The three countries explained, “a purported ban on nuclear weapons that does not address the security concerns that continue to make nuclear deterrence necessary cannot result in the elimination of a single nuclear weapon and will not enhance any country’s security, nor international peace and security.” Though the nuclear disarmament is controversial, Beatrice Fihn, the executive director of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, is certain nuclear weapons need to be banned to preserve life and ensure a habitable planet for future generations. She said , “If the world comes together in support of a nuclear ban, then nuclear weapons countries will likely follow suit, even if it doesn’t happen right away.” Via TIME , Futurism Images via Depositphotos and Pixabay

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The UN just passed a historic treaty banning nuclear weapons worldwide

Why 2,000-year-old Roman concrete is stronger than our own

July 10, 2017 by  
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The exact formula for Roman concrete has been lost. This is unfortunate, as many 2,000-year-old Roman concrete piers and breakwaters structures are even stronger today than they were when they were built millennia ago, while our modern marine concrete structures break down in decades. An international team of researchers recently discovered that seawater has a role to play in the ancient material’s surprising longevity. Concrete in ancient Rome was comprised of volcanic ash, lime, and seawater, mixed with chunks of volcanic rock. A team led by University of Utah geologist Marie Jackson discovered it’s seawater that could help the building material last – the substance fosters the growth of interlocking minerals that provide cohesion to the concrete. Related: Family accidentally discovers “extraordinarily well-preserved” Roman villa in England Back between 2002 and 2009 Jackson and colleagues found the rare mineral aluminous tobermorite, or Al-tobermorite, in Roman harbor concrete gathered by the ROMACONS project. The mineral is incredibly difficult to make in a laboratory, requiring high temperatures. Going back to those drill cores to scrutinize them with new methods for this research, Jackson found the mineral again along with a related one, phillipsite, in pumice particles and pores. The team knew something had to encourage those minerals to grow in low temperatures after the concrete hardened, and it turns out seawater washing over those piers and breakwaters could be the key. Jackson said in a statement, “We’re looking at a system that thrives in open chemical exchange with seawater…No one has produced tobermorite at 20 degrees Celsius. Oh – except the Romans!” Jackson has never come across the Roman recipe for concrete in an extensive search of old texts. But she’s working with geological engineer Tom Adams on a replacement recipe. The rocks the Romans used aren’t common throughout the world, so they’ll have to make substitutions. And if they’re successful, Roman concrete probably won’t start popping up everywhere, but could be perfect for certain projects like a proposed tidal lagoon for tidal power in the United Kingdom. Jackson is the lead author on a study published on July 3 in American Mineralogist . She was joined by researchers at institutions in China, Italy, Washington, and California. Via The University of Utah Images via J.P. Oleson and Marie Jackson

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Why 2,000-year-old Roman concrete is stronger than our own

How Earth Day began and how it helps the planet

April 17, 2017 by  
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Earth Day is April 22nd, and to get prepared for the big day, here are a few Earth Day facts that you may not know. Founded by United States Senator Gaylord Nelson as an environmental teach-in, the first ever Earth Day was held on April 22nd, 1970. Earth Day not only marks the beginnings of moving toward a more sustainable world, it’s a time to come together and contemplate our global environmental situation, as well as participate in community and global “green” activities. Read on to find out all about this important eco-holiday . Earth Day is one of the most widely celebrated environmental events across the globe. The first Earth Day was focused on protesting an oil spill off the coast of California, but today, the focus is on increasing awareness of the planet and all the issues around its health, from fracking and water pollution to rainforest depletion and animal extinctions. More than 20 million people and thousands of local schools and communities participated in the first Earth Day of United States that took place on 22 April 1970, and one of the results of that first celebration was the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Clean Air Act. It became an international event in 1971, when UN’s Secretary-General U Thant spoke about it at a Peace Bell Ceremony at the United Nations in New York City. On that first celebration, NYC’s mayor shut down Fifth Avenue for use on Earth Day, and allowed it to be celebrated in Central Park. Today, over 1 billion people celebrate Earth Day around the world. Earth Day is celebrated in 192 countries. This day is a time dedicated to increasing awareness about the Earth, its issues and its problems, and people in different countries take action that will benefit their region the most. For example: On Earth Day 2011, the Earth Day Network planted 28 million trees in Afghanistan. On Earth Day 2012, more than 100 thousand people in China rode their bikes to save fuel and reduce CO2 emissions from motor vehicles. In Panama, in honor of Earth Day, they planted 100 species of endangered orchids to prevent their extinction. In 2014, NASA participated in Earth Day with the agency’s #GlobalSelfie event , asking people to take a photo of themselves outside and post it to social media using the hashtag #GlobalSelfie. We can all use Earth Day as a time to reflect on our personal impact on the environment. Simply implementing something that promotes sustainability, such as a weekly recycling regimen, can truly make a difference. Let’s use today as a starting point for great change, and make every day an Earth Day. + Vangel The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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How Earth Day began and how it helps the planet

Earth Day Every Day: 5 Ways To Actually Make It Happen

April 22, 2016 by  
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It shouldn’t surprise anyone that Earth Day began in the 1970’s, the decade of hippies. The day was developed to celebrate mother nature – and in my mind, its founders dreamed it up while wearing tye-dye, flashing the peace sign…

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Earth Day Every Day: 5 Ways To Actually Make It Happen

Upcycle That Dingy Drawer Into This Beautiful DIY Bookcase

October 7, 2015 by  
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There are never enough bookcases for a bibliophile like me. Books are stacked beside my bed, they fill my (non-functioning) fireplace, and my actual bookcase is stuffed with tomes ranging from the weighty War and Peace to hot pink chick lit. What…

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Upcycle That Dingy Drawer Into This Beautiful DIY Bookcase

Earth Day: How it began, and how it helps the planet

April 22, 2015 by  
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Earth Day is April 22nd, and to get prepared for the big day, here are a few Earth Day facts that you may not know. Founded by United States Senator Gaylord Nelson as an environmental teach-in, the first ever Earth Day was held on April 22nd, 1970. Earth Day not only marks the beginnings of moving toward a more sustainable world, it’s a time to come together and contemplate our global environmental situation, as well as participate in community and global “green” activities. Read on to find out all about this important eco-holiday . Read the rest of Earth Day: How it began, and how it helps the planet Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: #earthdayfacts , clean air act , earth day , Earth Day 2015 , Earth Day facts , Earth Day information , environmental protection agency , Peace Bell Ceremony , reader submissions , Vangel

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Earth Day: How it began, and how it helps the planet

These sensory-friendly clothes make it easier to keep autistic kids safe

March 1, 2015 by  
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Parents of autistic children have a lot to keep tabs on. One of the most frightening tendencies for some children with autism is the tendency to wander off, which can be dangerous or even life-threatening, depending on the surroundings. Independence Day Clothing has created a smart, fashionable answer to this problem. They’ve embedded a tiny GPS-tracking device in sensory-friendly kids clothing to help parents keep track of their children . The monitoring device is so small and lightweight that neither the wearer, or their friends, will be notice it, but the peace of mind it can bring to a parent of an autistic child is priceless. Read more to find out about Independence Day Clothing’s current products, and what they have in mind for the future of autistic kids’ fashion. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: autism , children with autism , clothing for autistic children , dangerous autistic behaviors , dangers of autism , GPS enabled clothing , GPS tracking clothing , GPS tracking shirt , parents of autistic children , safe kids clothing

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These sensory-friendly clothes make it easier to keep autistic kids safe

Keystone XL battle should be about food security and climate change, not economics

February 24, 2015 by  
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As we await President Obama’s veto of the Keystone XL  pipeline, expected later today, news outlets far and wide are recapping the evolution of the debate. Unfortunately, the headlines often focus on the economy and only mention some vague connection to the environment. In reality, the Keystone XL battle isn’t just about money. It is about reducing fossil fuel emissions and protecting the land necessary for our food and water supplies. Read the rest of Keystone XL battle should be about food security and climate change, not economics Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: action , activism , ban fracking , capitalism , climate , Climate Change , climate chaos , Climate Disaster , congress , conservatives , creativity , drilling , earth , ECO:nomics , economy , Environment , Facebook , fight , Fossil Free , fossil fuels , fracking , frontlines , Future , future generations , gas , green , Grow , hydraulic fracturing , keystone pipeline , keystone pipeline climate change , keystone pipeline food security , keystone pipeline policy , keystone politics , keystone xl , KXL , Love , money , movement , natural gas , NOKXL , obama , oil , Op Ed , peace , pennsylvania , politics , protests , renewable energy , renewables , republicans , revolution , shale , shale gas , shalefields , skills , social media , XL Dissent

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Keystone XL battle should be about food security and climate change, not economics

Watch Leonardo DiCaprio’s Powerful Speech at the UN Climate Summit (Video)

September 24, 2014 by  
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Actor and environmental activist Leonardo DiCaprio delivered a brief but powerful speech Tuesday morning before world leaders gathered in New York City for the United Nations Climate Summit . DiCaprio, who on Sunday participated in the People’s Climate March — the biggest climate march in history with an estimated 400,000 concerned citizens hitting the streets of Manhattan to demand climate action — humbly implored the international community to “answer the greatest challenge of our existence on this planet” before it is too late. The recently appointed UN Messenger of Peace issued a bold challenge to the attendees, saying that “you can make history or be vilified by it.” Read the rest of Watch Leonardo DiCaprio’s Powerful Speech at the UN Climate Summit (Video) Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: clean energ , climate march , Leonardo DiCaprio , People’s Climate March , un climate summit

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Watch Leonardo DiCaprio’s Powerful Speech at the UN Climate Summit (Video)

BFI Announces Seven Pioneering Finalists for the 2014 Buckminster Fuller Challenge

September 24, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of BFI Announces Seven Pioneering Finalists for the 2014 Buckminster Fuller Challenge Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2014 Buckminster Fuller Challenge , bfi , bonobo peace forest , Buckminster Fuller , buckminster fuller challenge , living breakwaters , Makoko/Iwaya Waterfront Regeneration Plan , Socially-Responsible Design’s Highest Award , the food commons , The Force Majeure , The Lake Tanganyika Floating Health Clinic , Thunder Valley Regenerative Community Plan

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BFI Announces Seven Pioneering Finalists for the 2014 Buckminster Fuller Challenge

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