Dibdo Francis Kr unveils 2017 Serpentine Pavilion with rain-gathering roof

February 21, 2017 by  
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Burkina Faso-born architect Diébédo Francis Kéré has been selected as this year’s designer of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion —making him the first African architect of the annual pavilion. Kéré, who leads the Berlin-based practice Kéré Architecture, unveiled preliminary designs of a pavilion strongly influenced by the rural vernacular of his home country. Designed to mimic the functions and form of a large tree, the temporary pavilion will be topped by a large wooden disc that offers shelter and will help collect rainwater. Now in its 17th iteration, the annual Serpentine Pavilion commissions an international architect to build his or her first structure in London on the lawns of Kensington Gardens . Kéré draws from his experience in socially engaged and ecologically responsible design in his pavilion proposal that aims to connect visitors to nature, to Burkina Faso architecture, and with one another. The steel-framed pavilion is built mostly of wood and will be accessible via four separate entry points that lead to a central open-air courtyard. Related: BIG selected to design the 2016 Serpentine Pavilion Kéré wrote in his architect’s statement: “In Burkina Faso , the tree is a place where people gather together, where everyday activities play out under the shade of its branches. My design for the Serpentine Pavilion has a great over-hanging roof canopy made of steel and a transparent skin covering the structure, which allows sunlight to enter the space while also protecting it from the rain. Wooden shading elements line the underside of the roof to create a dynamic shadow effect on the interior spaces. This combination of features promotes a sense of freedom and community; like the shade of the tree branches, the Pavilion becomes a place where people can gather and share their daily experiences.” The pavilion’s design promotes natural ventilation for cooling in the summer. An oculus funnels collected rainwater from the roof to create a “spectacular waterfall effect” before it drains into a tank for reuse as park irrigation. The 2017 Serpentine Pavilion will be open to the public from June 23 to October 8, 2017. + Serpentine Galleries Images via Serpentine Galleries

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Dibdo Francis Kr unveils 2017 Serpentine Pavilion with rain-gathering roof

Ship-like Hidden Pavilion uses the surrounding forest like a protective envelope

February 15, 2017 by  
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This ship-like pavilion in Spain reconciles the openness of glass architecture and the need for privacy. Penelas Architects designed the Hidden Pavilion as a quiet retreat that protects its occupants not through the use of curtains or blinds, but by treating the surrounding forest as a kind of natural envelope. The pavilion is nestled in a forest glade just northwest of Madrid, Spain . Its isolated location allowed the architects to completely open up the building toward the surroundings and draw maximum natural light into its interior. Designed to become one with nature, the building incorporates an existing 200-year-old oak tree, along with younger trees, to grow through gaps in its terraced areas. Related: Kengo Kuma unveils “blossoming” glass and timber villas for Bali With a floor space of 753 square feet spread over two floors, the pavilion includes a veranda and a rooftop terrace that overlook the surrounding forest. Natural materials , steel and glass are combined to create a kind of industrial appearance of an ocean liner that, instead of oceans, navigates the lush landscapes of central Spain. + Penelas Architects Via New Atlas Photos by Miguel de Guzmán + Rocio Romero

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Ship-like Hidden Pavilion uses the surrounding forest like a protective envelope

Award-winning grass-covered pavilion in India constructed with over 1,000 recycled pallets

February 14, 2017 by  
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Over a thousand discarded shipping pallets went into the making of this partly planted, undulating pavilion in New Delhi. Local architecture firm M:OFA Studios drew inspiration from India’s ruins and their love of upcycling to create Pensieve, an award-winning experimental pavilion with a name inspired by the “memory basin” in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series. The temporary installation served as an urban playground and public gathering space that inspired people to contemplate their surroundings. Built as part of India Design ID 2014, the Pensieve is no longer standing though it continues to be recognized in awards, such as its nomination in the Kohler Bold Design Awards 2016. Over 1,200 recycled pallets were stacked together in an asymmetrical shape inspired by the hundreds of stone ruins that dot the capital, where many locals used as playgrounds in their childhood. Compost added inside some of the open pallets was used as a growing medium for grass and other plants. Related: Charming Wine Shop Built with Repurposed Shipping Pallets Pops Up in Poland “The concept initiated from the basic idea of ‘fluid’ thoughts,” write the architects. “Built out of recycled wood , this pavilion was asked on the idea of unobstructed thoughts associated often with the children. The pavilion became a reminder of those simpler times, where the kids looked at the world beyond a 4 inch by 3 inch display screen in their hands.” The large 800-square-foot installation framed a public gathering space that also included solar-powered furniture that lit up when people sat on them and a hundred fiber-optic sculptures that used motion sensors to light up at night. + M:OFA Studios Images via M:OFA Studios

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Award-winning grass-covered pavilion in India constructed with over 1,000 recycled pallets

Prefabricated garden retreat snaps together in less than a week

February 10, 2017 by  
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If your dream garden look like something from a fantasy world, you’ll love this Dragonfly Pavilion built for a backyard in Hoboken, New Jersey. Built from sustainably harvested and FSC-certified Sapele mahogany and recycled aluminum, this beautifully intricate garden shed takes inspiration from the complex pattern of butterfly and dragonfly wings. New York-based CDR Studio Architects designed this prefabricated backyard retreat, which took less than one week to install. Prefabricated by SITU Fabrication , Dragonfly Pavilion is made with a recycled aluminum frame clad in Sapele lumber and large sections of glazing. A single timber bench is built into the interior while a laminated-tempered glass sits on the roof. The glazing is broken up by a gradient of complex geometric shapes, or cells, that give the structure its delicate, dragonfly wing-like appearance. “These cells are more than just aesthetically appealing,” write the architects. “Their shape and size respond directly to the forces acting on it.” Related: Glowing bamboo pavilion promotes ecological design in Hong Kong The wing-like pattern was derived from a computer-generated algorithm. Mosquito netting is also installed on the interior of the mahogany cells, giving the structure a second, inner skin. The Dragonfly Pavilion’s simple rectangular form allows for a variety of programs, from use as a yoga studio to a small dining area. The pavilion was prefabricated offsite and then reassembled onsite in less than one week. + CDR Studio Architects Photography by John Muggenborg

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Prefabricated garden retreat snaps together in less than a week

New material converts sunlight, heat, and movement into electricityat the same time

February 10, 2017 by  
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Like harnessing the power of the sun or getting a charge from physical movement, the conversion of ambient energy into electricity is getting pretty old hat. Tapping multiple sources simultaneously, on the other hand, is something else altogether. The secret was under our noses this whole time. While minerals known as perovskites have shown promise for extracting one or two types of energy concurrently, one particular member of that family leaves them in the shade by distilling sunlight, heat, and movement into electricity at once. Like all perovskites, KBNNO is ferroelectric in nature. This means it contains tiny electric dipoles, packed with positive charges on one end and negative charges on the other, according to scientists from University of Oulu , who described the material in the journal Applied Physics Letters this week. Changes in temperature coaxes these dipoles to shift, which in turn induces an electric current. Likewise, mechanical stress causes parts of the material to attract or repel charges, producing another current. KBNNO’s photovoltaic and ferroelectric properties have been the subject of prior research, but the Oulu study marks the first time anyone has evaluated properties relating to temperature and pressure. Previous studies also operated at temperatures hundreds of degrees below freezing, rather than above room temperature, as the latest experiments did. Related: Piezoelectric device harvests wasted heat energy from tech Still, there was one wrinkle: Although KBNNO proved “reasonably good” at generating electricity from heat and pressure, scientists didn’t think it quite measured up to its fellow perovskites—at least, not without some tinkering, say by preparing KBNNO with sodium to amplify certain piezoelectric or pyroelectric properties. “It is possible that all these properties can be tuned to a maximum point,” Yang Bai, who led the study, said in a statement. By next year, Bai and his team say they hope to construct a prototype of a multi-energy-harvesting device – one that could render batteries for portable devices obsolete. He said, “This will push the development of the Internet of Things and smart cities, where power-consuming sensors and devices can be energy sustainable”. + American Institute of Physics Via PhysOrg Photos by Arcadiuš and TimOve

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New material converts sunlight, heat, and movement into electricityat the same time

Desert Rain House in Oregon is one of the greenest homes in the world

February 10, 2017 by  
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There’s a new contender for the world’s greenest home: Desert Rain House in Bend, Oregon . Designed by Tozer Design , the LEED Platinum home recycles all its water, produces more power than it can use, and it is the first residential compound to be certified by the Living Building Challenge . Solar panels and a rainwater collection cistern help this super green home pioneer a new paradigm for sustainable family living. The five-building Desert Rain House boasts seriously environmentally friendly features. Human waste is composted thanks to a central composting system, and greywater is reused for irrigation via a constructed wetland. Natural and local materials comprise the elegant dwellings; reclaimed lumber and plaster made with local clay, sand, and straw are among the sustainable building materials utilized. Related: Kansas University students build net-zero home with LEED Platinum and Passive House certification Materials from old buildings that once occupied the site were repurposed for Desert Rain House, such as old stone salvaged from old foundations and used in concrete for patios. The team that built the home looked for ways to reduce their carbon footprint as much as possible. For example, instead of having a manufacturer ship them roofing panels, the team assembled roofing onsite from a large roll of steel. Red List-compliant sealants and finishes also make for a non-toxic environment. Indoors the air is clear: not only can the owners open large windows for air circulation, but a waste heat-capturing energy recovery ventilator also means fresh air continually wafts through the main residence. Three homes and two out-buildings add up to 4,810 square feet situated on 0.7 acres. Elliott Scott, who owns the home with his wife Barbara, said in a statement, “We can’t continue thinking we are building a better world by making a ‘less bad’ version of the world we have created. The Living Building Challenge forces us to think in terms of a new paradigm.” + Tozer Design + Desert Rain House Via International Living Future Institute and Curbed Images via Desert Rain House Facebook and Desert Rain House

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Desert Rain House in Oregon is one of the greenest homes in the world

Flexible Una Pavilion is designed to be super stable and easy to construct

January 24, 2017 by  
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All the elements of this multi-purpose pavilion in Brazil contribute to its structural stability and the ease of its construction. Brazilian architecture office Apiacás Arquitetos designed the Una Pavilion using standardized elements, achieving a high degree of programmatic flexibility. The pavilion is located in a residential condominium near São Paulo in Brazil. Surrounded by a lush rainforest with a running stream nearby, the building had to be elevated from the ground in order to avoid flooding. Metal connections were used to assemble the wooden elements, including large pivot doors that make up the facade. Related: Ecocentric cantilevered home was designed to conform to the sloping Brazilian landscape Interspersed wooden slats facilitate a visual connection to the forest, while protecting the interior from excessive sun and rainfall. The minimalist wood furniture follows the constructive logic based on simplicity. + Apiacás Arquitetos Via Plataforma Arquitectura Photos by Leonardo Finotti

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Flexible Una Pavilion is designed to be super stable and easy to construct

Nature and art overlap in this sinuous pavilion in Taipei City

January 19, 2017 by  
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Indoor and outdoor scenery overlap in this sinuous pavilion by Emerge Architects . The SINICA Eco-Pavilion was tailored to the existing trees on the site, and meanders in-between them to create an organic space where nature is as much on display as the exhibition housed inside the building. The building, located within a restoration area of Taipei ‘s leading academic institution, Academia Sinica, features long stretches of curved glass surfaces that facilitate ambiguous spatial perception for visitors. The line between the inside and outside disappears as one navigates the interior space and explores different exhibitions. Different spatial pockets such as the lobby, screening room and exhibition areas create fluid transitions. Related: Sinuous concrete pavilion is a spiritual oasis at the City of Hope research and treatment center Through interdisciplinary integration and collaboration between curators and architects, the pavilion establishes a strong dialogue with its surroundings. This diminished the distinction between architecture, landscape and art, merging them all into a single, unified experience. + Emerge Architects Via Architizer Photos by Kyle Yu, Sam Yang, WK Chou

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Nature and art overlap in this sinuous pavilion in Taipei City

Ron Arad designs the modular Armadillo Tea Pavilion for indoor and outdoor use

October 18, 2016 by  
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As a modular structure, the Armadillo Tea Pavilion can be expanded as needed and reconfigured to suit a variety of needs. The base model measures 18 square meters and comprises five molded shells connected together with fixings crafted from hand-patinated brass and bronze. Made from timber , the shells can be completed using the buyer’s choice in a set range of finishes depending on the pavilion’s intended use. Durable PVDF-coated timber composite is offered for outdoor applications, while oiled hardwood-veneered plywood is suggested for internal use. Related: The Nest Pod is futuristic prefab home that can pop up anywhere in the world “The Armadillo Tea Pavilion is designed as an independent shell structure, for use indoors and outdoors, which provides an intimate enclosure, shelter or place of reflection within a garden, landscape, or large internal space,” says the description on Revolution Precrafted. Interested buyers can submit a form on Revolution Precrafted’s website to inquire about availability and price. + Armadillo Tea Pavilion Via Fubiz Images via Revolution Precrafted

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Ron Arad designs the modular Armadillo Tea Pavilion for indoor and outdoor use

Studio Mumbai completes handmade pavilion crafted from seven kilometers of bamboo

October 4, 2016 by  
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When we first reported on the 2016 MPavilion , organizers hoped the structure would be Australia’s largest bamboo structure, but whether or not that goal has been achieved is yet to be confirmed. Architect Bijoy Jain originally planned to build the roof and awning with karvi panels, made from a mix of cow dung and earth, however the material proved unsuitable for Melbourne’s climate. Despite the setback, the MPavilion 2016 is an impressive example of handmade architecture constructed from handcrafted Indian techniques and materials. Seven kilometers of bamboo, 50 tons of stone, and 26 kilometers of rope sourced from India and Australia were used to make the 16.8-square-meter summer pavilion. Instead of Karvi panels, the roof is built using sticks from the Karvi plant woven together by craftspeople in India over four months. Related: Handmade MPavilion will be the largest bamboo structure ever built in Australia “MPavilion is a space for the people of Melbourne to gather, talk, think and to reflect,” said Jain. “My objective has not just been to create a new building, but to capture the spirit of the place by choosing the right materials, respecting the surrounding nature and working collaboratively with local craftspeople to share design and construction ideas.” An opening at the center of MPavilion’s roof brings additional light to the space, while a golden well below collects rainwater . An elaborate ‘tazia’ entrance tower, seen in Indian ceremonies, sits adjacent. The pavilion will host a light and music show activated at dusk every night. The annual MPavilion is in its third iteration and was initiated and commissioned by the Naomi Milgrom Foundation with support from the City of Melbourne and the Victorian State Government. After this year’s MPavilion season is over, the structure will be moved to a new permanent location in Melbourne. + Studio Mumbai + MPavilion Images by John Gollings

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Studio Mumbai completes handmade pavilion crafted from seven kilometers of bamboo

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