Rammed-charcoal home extension is a handsome oasis between the trees

August 8, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Melbourne-based Branch Studio Architects crafted this dark and handsome number hidden away among the trees in Victoria. Built as a house extension with a master suite, the Pavilion Between Trees features rammed-charcoal walls, clean and crisp lines, and a dark earthy palette of complementary materials. Full height glazing opens the interior up to the outdoors and frames view of the forested surroundings. Connected to the main house via a corridor, Pavilion Between Trees is a semi-detached structure that appears to standalone in the landscape. The 85-square-meter compact extension is simply but tastefully furnished and includes a master bedroom, en-suite bathroom, and extra storage space arranged in a linear plan. The rooms are delineated by subtle changes in floor level rather than walls. Natural light plays a key role in the design and is let in through clerestory windows and full-height glazing. The lighting brings out the texture of the earthy material palette, from the grainy rammed-charcoal walls to the smooth naturally finished timber and steel joinery, that are left exposed to develop a patina over time. Related: Rustic Off-Grid Pump House is a Solar-Powered Weekend Getaway in Australia The home addition was built on a clearing between existing mature trees to reduce site impact. Full-height glazing, which wraps around the western end and that also punctuates the north and south sides, frame views and strengthens connection to the outdoors. The clerestory windows also offer glimpses of the tree canopy. An outdoor washing area also allows the homeowners to enjoy the outdoors in a private space protected by a mesh screen. + Branch Studio Architects Via Dezeen Images via Branch Studio Architects

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Rammed-charcoal home extension is a handsome oasis between the trees

Drone video reveals progress on Heatherwicks tree-covered mountain architecture in Shanghai

August 8, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Shanghai’s “tree-covered mountains” are coming to life as evidenced in #donotsettle project’s latest video. Filmed with a DJI Mavic Pro drone, architects Wahyu Pratomo and Kris Provoost’s footage shows a sneak peek into the construction progress of the Heatherwick Studio-designed project for M50, the city’s contemporary art district. The six-hectare plot will feature staggered, mountain-like volumes enveloped by 1,000 trees. Par for the course for Shanghai’s futuristic cityscape, this unusual 330,000-square-meter mixed-use development will comprise housing, offices, retail, a hotel, and a school. As seen in the drone footage, trees have already been installed on the undulating building’s columnar planters. The planting will help soften the appearance of the concrete volume once they mature. Related: Heatherwick Studio wants to build a tree-covered mountain in the middle of Shanghai “Conceived not as a building but as a piece of topography , the design takes the form of two tree-covered mountains, populated by approximately one thousand structural columns,” said Heatherwick Studio . “Instead of being hidden behind the facade, the columns are the defining feature of the design, emerging from the building to support plants and trees.” The development is slated to open in 2018. + Heatherwick Studio Via ArchDaily Images via #donotsettle

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Drone video reveals progress on Heatherwicks tree-covered mountain architecture in Shanghai

Dutch engineers test floating island to combat rising sea levels

August 8, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

It’s no secret that sea levels are rising and land is becoming even more scarce. This is particularly sobering in the Netherlands , where two-thirds of the country dips below sea level . Fortunately, Dutch engineers are already developing solutions, including a “floating mega-island” comprised of 87 floating triangles tethered to the ocean floor. Engineers from the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) revealed the prototype of the design in a bid to entice investors. The floating island concept, which is made up of triangles composed of wood and polystyrene , was tested out in a water tank, complete with simulated wind and waves. MARIN’s goal for the future is to see the floating islands grow to 5 kilometers or 3.1 miles. The space will be large enough for a city-sized settlement of homes, farms , parks, recreational areas, and ports. As IFLScience reports, it would also be an ideal setting for sustainable energy projects that require access to the sea. Offshore wind farms, tidal energy, wave energy and floating solar panels would power the mega island. Related: Amazing Dutch Windwheel is a green energy generator you can live in Olaf Waals, project manager and designer of the concept at MARIN, said in a statement, “In a time of rising sea levels, overpopulated cities, and an increasing number of activities at sea, raising dikes and spraying of sand may not be the most effective solution. Floating ports and cities are an innovative alternative that fits the Dutch maritime tradition.” Though there are numerous obstacles to developing the floating island concept, Waals told AFP News Agency that both he and the Institute are confident the project will be feasible — as well as necessary — within the next 10 to 20 years. Waals told the Dutch newspaper Telegraaf that faced with rising sea levels and a lack of space, “the Netherlands will have to divert back towards the water.” Via CNN Images via MARIN

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Dutch engineers test floating island to combat rising sea levels

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