Gorgeous solar-powered Colorado home produces almost all its own energy

May 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Gorgeous solar-powered Colorado home produces almost all its own energy

Sustainability and a love for nature inspired Colorado-based CCY Architects’ design of the gorgeous Starwood Residence. Set on a ridge line, this luxury mountain home with floor-to-ceiling glazing overlooks the Roaring Fork Valley and Elk Mountains. Solar energy powers the energy-efficient Starwood Residence, which is capable of producing 70% of the energy that it consumes. The Starwood Residence lies low on the landscape with a series of sloping rooflines that appear to echo the surrounding mountain landscape. Weathered steel wraps the home to blend the building into the natural backdrop, while exterior sunshades maximize access to natural light and minimize solar heat gain in summer. In contrast to the steel-clad facade, the interior is richly layered with warm textures, from stone accent walls to Clear Vertical Grain (CVG) Douglas Fir siding. Large panoramic windows appear to extend the living areas outdoors. Related: Black Magic home sits lightly in a mountain oasis In addition to daylighting , the architects improved the home’s energy efficiency with exposed concrete floors—used almost exclusively throughout the home—that provide thermal mass to absorb and release passive solar heat in cold months. The nearly energy-sufficient home draws power from a 7-kw solar array , 12 evacuated tubes for solar thermal, and a ground source heat pump for radiant cooling and heating. The weathered steel siding contains a high percentage of recycled material and all the concrete used includes a minimum of 20 percent fly ash. + CCY Architects

Read more here:
Gorgeous solar-powered Colorado home produces almost all its own energy

Zero-carbon home generates income by making more energy than it needs

March 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Zero-carbon home generates income by making more energy than it needs

The home of the future could slash your utility bills and generate enough money to help pay the mortgage. UK firm Koru Architects designed and built one such house, named the Lloyd House, that’s effectively zero-carbon and runs entirely on renewable energy. Tucked away on a quiet street in England’s East Sussex, this contemporary home generates more energy than it consumes and even brings in a net income of £2650 per year from solar photovoltaics, solar thermal, and a wood-chip biomass boiler. Completed in 2011 as a case study, the Lloyd House is a large and contemporary three-bedroom home that only consumes around half the energy of a typical UK household thanks to its use of passive solar design, energy efficient appliances, effective insulation, and high airtightness. The home was built with mostly natural materials including sustainably sourced timber for the cladding and flooring, zinc roofing, hemp and wood-fiber insulation, recycled glass in the kitchen countertops, and lime-based natural plants. Sedum plants carpet the roof to add an additional layer of insulation and provide habitat to local insects and birds. A 4,700-liter Freewater UK Elite rainwater harvesting system collects rainwater for reuse in irrigation, the washing machine, and the dual-flush toilets. The Lloyd House produces all the hot water it needs for domestic use and for the underfloor heating with a 6-kilowatt solar thermal system and a 10.5-kilowatt wood-pellet boiler. A twelve 340-kilowatt peak solar array provides around 3800 kilowatt-hour of electricity annually, which is more than it uses thanks to its energy-efficient measures. Excess energy is exported to the grid and, with the help of renewable heat incentive and feed-in-tariff schemes, the home brings in a net annual income of £2650 ($3,300 USD) after bills are subtracted. The house emits 93% less carbon dioxide equivalent than the average UK household. Related: Colorful wind-powered community in Scotland is everything an eco-village should be Constructed with passive solar principles, the airtight home is oriented towards the south with large areas of glazing to take advantage of the sun’s heat and natural lighting to reduce energy demand. High-level skylights also flood the interior with natural light. In addition to the three bedrooms, the home comprises a home office, two bathrooms, living room, utility room, open plan kitchen and dining area, garage, and garden. The spacious and comfortable interior is organized into split-levels to make the most of the sloped site. “The house is expected to last around 80 years, and through its generation of clean energy it is expected to offset 41 tonnes of carbon over its life,” write the architects. “Including the replacement of the renewable energy technologies, it would take 48 years to become entirely carbon-neutral.” The project was awarded the RIBA Download Prize 2011 in the category for sustainability and serves as a source of green inspiration for the community. + Koru Architects

Go here to read the rest:
Zero-carbon home generates income by making more energy than it needs

A unique community of modern green homes hug the desert floor in Utah

June 20, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A unique community of modern green homes hug the desert floor in Utah

According to Joshua and Natsuko Shaffer, the couple behind Chibi Moku, Marten is a pioneer of “desert modern architecture .” Educated as an architect, Marten wanted to create homes that would protect the spectacular views, utilizing materials and colors that would blend in with the desert. The homes in Kayenta are low-lying, with plenty of windows so residents can appreciate the splendor that surrounds them. Related: Gorgeous desert home blurs the lines between indoor and outdoor living Marten brought the spirit of southern California to the Utah community. Kayenta began as ” a hybrid of beach culture and desert living ” and the homes in the community also have a southwestern flair. Kayenta homes incorporate a variety of ” energy-efficient features ” and draw on passive solar design . Some are equipped with solar panels. Builder Brent Smith summed up the vision behind the houses. He said, “It’s really important in architecture that a house grace the landscape, so when you see that house, and you have all the environment around it – the cliffs and everything else – it blends in.” The Shaffers describe Marten as “a very special man who never cared about money in his life.” Now in his 80’s, Marten has watched other like-minded people flock to Kayenta and embrace his dream. Some of the residents said in the documentary that since most have come to Kayenta from elsewhere, they all want to be there, and that’s part of what makes Kayenta such a special place to reside. The 2,000 acre Kayenta community is still open to new residents with lots of up to two acres. There’s also an inn there if people want to experience desert living without committing to living there full time. + Kayenta + Chibi Moku Images courtesy of Chibi Moku

Here is the original post: 
A unique community of modern green homes hug the desert floor in Utah

NASA confirms a second mini moon is circling Earth

June 20, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on NASA confirms a second mini moon is circling Earth

For most relationships, 100 years is well past the point in time when you can ‘make it official,’ but for planets, it’s just right. After nearly a century in Earth’s orbit, a tiny asteroid has earned NASA’s recognition as Earth’s new “mini moon.” Measuring between 120 feet to 300 feet in diameter, the minuscule rock slowly circles the sun on a similar orbit as Earth and NASA scientists now reveal that it circles Earth as well – not entirely unlike the moon we already know and love. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbbAnVU4rmY NASA scientists estimate that Earth’s new playmate, known as “asteroid 2016 HO3,” has probably been around for about 100 years. It was first detected on April 27 by the Pan-STARRS 1 asteroid survey telescope on Haleakala, Hawaii, which is operated by the University of Hawaii’s Institute for Astronomy. Although the asteroid moon is currently in Earth’s orbit, it may not stay for long—at least in the grand scheme of the timeline of the universe. The asteroid’s own orbit has a unique pattern, doing a slow back-and-forth twist over multiple decades, and it’s expected to continue flirting with our green planet for at least a few more centuries. Related: NASA rolls out new asteroid detection program to defend Earth from destructive meteors Paul Chodas, manager of NASA’s Center for Near-Earth Object (NEO) Studies at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, explains that because of its distance, the new mini moon is a “quasi-satellite” of Earth rather than a true satellite. “The asteroid ‘s loops around Earth drift a little ahead or behind from year to year, but when they drift too far forward or backward, Earth’s gravity is just strong enough to reverse the drift and hold onto the asteroid so that it never wanders farther away than about 100 times the distance of the moon,” said Chodas. “The same effect also prevents the asteroid from approaching much closer than about 38 times the distance of the moon. In effect, this small asteroid is caught in a little dance with Earth.” Over the years, other asteroids have done a similar dance with our planet , but those were more like flings than long-term relationships, if we’re going to continue the metaphor. Over 10 years ago, asteroid 2003 YN107 followed a similar orbital pattern for a short time, according to Chodas, but it has since left Earth’s vicinity. “This new asteroid is much more locked onto us,” he said, predicting that it will stick around for “centuries to come.” + NASA Images via NASA/JPL-Caltech

See the rest here:
NASA confirms a second mini moon is circling Earth

Solar-powered Floating Tidal House defies climate change with retractable legs

June 20, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered Floating Tidal House defies climate change with retractable legs

The concept house can flow with the tides and respond to environmental changes. Its legs can be deployed and retracted from the bottom of the San Francisco Bay using a rack and pinion gear system. Independently operable legs allow the structure to stay balanced and positioned closer to the surface of the water. Thanks to its aerodynamic spherical roof, the Tidal House can withstand strong winds and generate clean energy through integrated photovoltaic systems. Related: Two converging wings create a glass-clad fissure in the renovated mid-century Bal House Tidal House can be used as a prototypical floating structure for entire communities connected via a floating dock. The unique environmental conditions of each house, dependent on position around the dock, are addressed through the system of retractable legs and structural design. The solution can also accommodate different lifestyles and programs. + Terry & Terry Architecture Via v2com Photos by Patricia Parinejad

Excerpt from: 
Solar-powered Floating Tidal House defies climate change with retractable legs

2,000-year-old butter found in Irish bog is still edible

June 20, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 2,000-year-old butter found in Irish bog is still edible

Long before the invention of refrigerators, ancient people found creative ways to keep their dairy products fresh. In parts of Ireland and Scotland , that sometimes involved burying mounds of butter in local bogs, where the low temperature, high acidity, and minimal oxygen would provide safe, long-term storage. One such piece of “bog butter” was recovered recently from Ireland’s Emlagh Bog. It weighs a massive 10 kilos (22 pounds) and it’s estimated to be over 2,000 years old – yet it appears to still technically be edible (although scientists advise against trying it). The remarkable find was made by turf cutter Jack Conaway while he was cutting peat for fuel. Conaway discovered the butter 12 feet down and immediately contacted the Cavan County Museum about his find, which is now housing the bog butter in its Conservation Department. According to the Museum, butter was once a luxury product, used in medieval times to pay taxes and rents. This particular lump of butter, however, lacks any kind of protective covering and was likely never intended to be dug up and used, leading researchers to suspect it was left as an offering to the gods. Related: Massive 1,000 LB Butter Sculpture Will Power Pennsylvania Farm for Three Days Surprisingly, this isn’t the biggest or oldest lump of bog butter to be recovered in Ireland. In 2013, another turf cutter found a massive container containing 45 kilograms (100 pounds) of butter that dated back 5,000 years. + Cavan County Museum Via Epoch Times Images via Cavan County Museum

More here: 
2,000-year-old butter found in Irish bog is still edible

Giant bubble “greenhouse” covers this lush new retail center in Turkey

February 24, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Giant bubble “greenhouse” covers this lush new retail center in Turkey

Read the rest of Giant bubble “greenhouse” covers this lush new retail center in Turkey

Go here to read the rest: 
Giant bubble “greenhouse” covers this lush new retail center in Turkey

Stunning energy-smart home near D.C. looks like a super swanky Tetris ensemble

February 12, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Stunning energy-smart home near D.C. looks like a super swanky Tetris ensemble

Read the rest of Stunning energy-smart home near D.C. looks like a super swanky Tetris ensemble

Read the original here: 
Stunning energy-smart home near D.C. looks like a super swanky Tetris ensemble

Solar-powered Bush House exemplifies chic eco-friendly living in the Australian outback

January 19, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered Bush House exemplifies chic eco-friendly living in the Australian outback

Read the rest of Solar-powered Bush House exemplifies chic eco-friendly living in the Australian outback

Go here to read the rest: 
Solar-powered Bush House exemplifies chic eco-friendly living in the Australian outback

Beautiful contemporary farmhouse harnesses all of its water supply onsite

December 29, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Beautiful contemporary farmhouse harnesses all of its water supply onsite

Read the rest of Beautiful contemporary farmhouse harnesses all of its water supply onsite

Read more from the original source: 
Beautiful contemporary farmhouse harnesses all of its water supply onsite

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1448 access attempts in the last 7 days.