NY man spends 6 years building this incredible, energy-efficient hobbit home

September 13, 2018 by  
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A lot of lives have been touched by the Lord of the Rings films, but super fan Jim Costigan took it one step further by building his own Bag End-inspired hobbit home . The New York construction supervisor and his family spent more than six years building the energy-efficient cottage with a curved shape and lush green roof that would even make Bilbo Baggins a little bit envious. Like millions of people, Jim Costigan was enthralled by The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. Specifically, though, he was drawn to the home of Bilbo Baggins, Bag End. The curved home enveloped in greenery spoke to Costigan’s love of design.  “I thought that was the coolest house I’d ever seen,” Costigan said. “Architecturally, I thought that that house in the movie was just really well-done, that it was really original. The curvatures, everything about it was unique.” Although Costigan had spent most of his career working on skyscrapers in Manhattan, he decided to re-create the charming design in his own backyard, with a cottage he now calls Hobbit Hollow. Related: This earth-sheltered Australian hobbit home stays cozy all year More than just a fan’s whimsy, the ambitious builder set about to not only recreate the famed hobbit home, but to make it an earth-sheltered passive house . From the start, the entire project was integrated with energy-efficient details, including thermal bridge-free construction that provides a tightly insulated shell, as well as triple-pane thermal windows and a heat recovery ventilator. Starting with a concrete foundation, the 1,500-square-foot home was built with various creative features that showed off his attention to hobbit detail as well as his commitment to sustainability . Just like Bag End, the exterior of the house is clad in natural stone. However, when it came to putting in the signature round door, there was a bit of a snag, because it didn’t meet Passive House standards. Working around the problem, Costigan built a circular red frame that hides the rectangular door. And of course, no hobbit home would be complete without a lush green roof that follows the curve of the design, blending it deep into the landscape. On the inside of the home, a high barrel-vaulted ceiling gives the tiny space character and depth. The abundance of windows and skylights in every room, except the guest bathroom, flood the interior with natural light . Adding to the charm is the various geometric shapes and patterns that the family imprinted into the concrete ceiling and skylight borders themselves. As an extra nod to the beloved films, a replica sword hangs over the electric stone fireplace, a gift to Costigan from his sons. Located in Pawling, New York, the two-bedroom, two-bathroom hobbit home sits on 1.7 acres of natural forestscape with an open-air bluestone patio in the back. From there, the family and visitors enjoy the sounds of a babbling stream that leads to an idyllic Shire-like waterfall and pond. + My Hobbit Shed Via Houzz Images via Jim Costigan

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Mark+Vivi convert a tire shop into an artsy, energy-efficient live/work studio

December 9, 2016 by  
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Look inside Mark+Vivi’s live/work studio and it’s hard to imagine that this beautiful light-filled space used to be a 1920s tire shop. The dramatic transformation from industrial roots to a new chic appearance is a testament to the skills of Mark+Vivi, an interdisciplinary design/build studio based on Montreal, Canada. Located in the transitioning city of Verdun, Quebec, the studio, named the Tire Shop Project, consumes 35 to 50% less energy than similar sized homes in the city thanks to energy-efficient retrofits like double-glazed windows and an inverter ducted heating and cooling system. The Tire Shop was Mark+Vivi’s inaugural project that functioned as the designers’ live/work studio and the home to La Façade Art + Architecture, a storefront gallery dedicated to the exhibition of local contemporary art and experimental architecture. Sustainability was at the heart of the 800-square-foot renovation , from the reuse of the building to the designers’ focus on passive energy design. “One of the greatest sustainable aspects of our building is not what was used to revitalise it but rather how we live because of it,” said designers Mark Fekete and Viviana de Loera. Related: JZA+D transforms a defunct Princeton gas station into a pumping pizza joint Mark+Vivi preserved the original building footprint but replaced all of the windows with double-glazed, low-E units. A shop window with commercial-grade storefront glazing was added in the front to show off the art on the display. All the internal floors, shelving, and cabinetry were built from locally sourced Canadian plywood , and the painted and exposed surfaces were finished in low-VOC treatments. An energy-efficient 12,000-btu interior wall-mounted inverter ducted system provides all the heating and cooling. Natural light floods the interior, which further minimized energy use. The Tire Shop project was completed at a cost of $150 per square foot, a considerable savings from the typical $200-$350 per square foot for new construction of projects of comparable size in Montreal. + Mark+Vivi Via v2com Images by Adrien Williams

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Mark+Vivi convert a tire shop into an artsy, energy-efficient live/work studio

Solar-powered DURAhome is a 100% self-sufficient shelter built for disaster zones

October 6, 2015 by  
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Barkow Leibinger’s timber-clad campus puts a contemporary spin on medieval architecture

May 19, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Barkow Leibinger’s timber-clad campus puts a contemporary spin on medieval architecture Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Barkow Leibinger , energy efficient , Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS , Fraunhofer Research Campus by Barkow Leibinger , larch , passive energy rating , patina , post and beam , standing seam copper , timber truss work , Waischenfeld

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Barkow Leibinger’s timber-clad campus puts a contemporary spin on medieval architecture

Now you can carry around your own pop-up hotel room with Travelbox

May 19, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Now you can carry around your own pop-up hotel room with Travelbox Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green design , Juust , pop-up hotel , portable furniture , sustainable design , Travelbox

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Minga Verde is a Spectacular Sustainable Shelter Set in the Foothills of Chile

October 24, 2011 by  
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A young couple had a dream of owning a space where they could invite both their family and friends during holidays away from Santiago, Chile . To create a spectacular and cozy space, the couple’s core concepts for their home, Minga Verde , was to incorporate a single large display window that would provide panoramic views of the surrounding site, and to create and outdoor space that would promote outdoor activities, socials, and more. The home is split between a bedroom, a bathroom, a kitchen, a living room, and an exterior terrace with a barbecue spot. All the areas are sheltered under a big roof, and users can appreciate the surroundings from inside at all times, given the side-to-side glazing on south façade. The home also incorporates  passive energy technologies and the installation of solar panels atop the roof, ensuring the provision of free hot water and electricity year round. + Minga Verde The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!   Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: architecture chile , Chile , Green Building , Minga Verde , passive energy technologies , santiago , solar energy homes , solar panels atop the roof , Sustainable Building , Sustainable Shelter

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Minga Verde is a Spectacular Sustainable Shelter Set in the Foothills of Chile

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