Guallart Architects unveil winning bid for a self-sufficient community in China

August 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Guallart Architects unveil winning bid for a self-sufficient community in China

Barcelona-based Guallart Architects has won an international competition for its design of a mixed-use, self-sufficient community in China’s Xiong’an New Area. Presented as a model for sustainable urban growth, the project champions local energy production, food production, energy efficiency and material reuse. The tech-forward proposal also takes the needs of a post-COVID-19 era and growing work-from-home trend in account by designing for comfortable telework spaces in all residences. Established in April 2017, China’s Xiong’an New Area was created as a development hub for the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei economic triangle. Guallart Architects’ winning proposal for a mixed-use community is part of a scheme to raise the cachet of Xiong’an New Area and provide a post- COVID model that could be implemented in different cities around the world. Related: UNSense to develop a 100-home “real-life testing environment” for the future of housing “We cannot continue designing cities and buildings as if nothing had happened,” Guallart Architects said. “Our proposal stem from the need to provide solutions to the various crises that are taking place in our planet at the same time, in order to create a new urban life based in the circular bioeconomy that will empower cities and communities.” At the heart of the proposal is self-sufficiency ; residents would produce resources locally while staying connected globally. The mixed-use development would consist of four city blocks with buildings constructed with mass timber and passive design solutions. In addition to a mix of residential typologies, the community would include office spaces, recreational areas, retail, a supermarket, a kindergarten, an administrative center, a fire station and other communal facilities. All buildings would be topped with greenhouses to produce food for daily consumption as well as rooftop solar panels. On the ground floor, the architects have included small co-working factories equipped with 3D-printers and rapid prototyping machines for providing everyday items. All apartments would come with telework spaces, 5G networks and large south-facing terraces. + Guallart Architects Images via Guallart Architects

Read the original here: 
Guallart Architects unveil winning bid for a self-sufficient community in China

Tiny minimalist cabin in the Pyrenees uses natural materials

May 21, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Tiny minimalist cabin in the Pyrenees uses natural materials

Although known as one of the most idyllic areas in Spain, the Catalan Pyrenees are also known for their rugged landscapes and harsh winter climate, both of which make construction very challenging. Barcelona-based firm  Agora Arquitectura  recently took on this challenge by building the Weekend Shelter — a tiny, minimalist cabin constructed out of carefully-selected natural materials that make the structure extremely  resilient. At just 430 square feet, the Weekend Shelter was designed to be a part-time refuge set in the remote area of Isòvol, Spain .  The region is known for its breathtaking landscapes and extremely harsh winters, which are marked by heavy snow and rain. Accordingly, the  shelter’s construction  is a complex combination made out of resilient and sustainable natural materials that can withstand the test of time. Related: These solar-powered prefab cabins can be set up in just 4 hours The structure was  prefabricated off-site  to save on construction costs and minimize environmental impact. Once the prefab pieces were delivered on-site, the cabin was assembled quickly. The first step was to elevate the structure off the landscape to protect it and add a flexible option to move the shelter in the future if necessary. The shelter design consists of three thermal layers. First, the frame of the structure is made out of concrete blocks to help create a strong barrier from snow and moisture. Then, a shell of oriented strand board was used to cover the main frame. To add an extra layer of resilience, the exterior was then clad in panels of expanded  corks  and topped with a rubber membrane, again creating an impermeable shell. Three large sliding glass doors lead to the interior, which is flooded with natural light. The interior walls, ceilings and flooring are all covered in  sustainably-sourced  plywood panels, which, according to the architects, help provide great thermal and acoustic protection to the living space. Throughout the structure, the cabin counts on several  passive strategies  to reduce its energy use. Being oriented towards the south ensures that the interior is illuminated by natural light. The glass doors are double-paned to limit heat loss during winter. Additionally, wrapping around the front walkway is a simple system of roll-up shutters that allow the residents to fully control the amount of shade and sun that enters the living space. + Agora Arquitectura Via Archdaily Photography by Joan Casals Pañella

Read the original:
Tiny minimalist cabin in the Pyrenees uses natural materials

‘Hovering’ gardens passively cool this energy-efficient home

May 19, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on ‘Hovering’ gardens passively cool this energy-efficient home

Indian design firm Niraj Doshi Design Consultancy has unveiled a stunning home in Pune, India that proves that greenery is much more than just decoration. Built for a large family of six, the Hovering Gardens House is an exquisite example of how combining natural materials, such as rocks and plants, can result in a contemporary, energy-efficient home  that sits in harmony with nature. The three-story home has plenty of indoor and outdoor space. The main volume is an H-shaped structure with a massive central courtyard , all surrounded by a barrier wall made of natural rock. Related: This café in Vietnam is a modern-day Hanging Gardens of Babylon Keeping India’s hot and humid climate in mind, the architects designed the house with several passive features , such as the cantilevered balconies that “hover” over the spaces below. These balconies are covered in hanging vegetation to further protect the interiors from harsh sunlight. Additionally, the house was installed with several vertical screen facades, which provide the family with privacy while also permitting sun and air to filter through the main living areas. For additional cooling, the family can use a state-of-the-art indirect evaporative cooling system that reduces reliance on conventional, energy-intensive air conditioners. Throughout the interior, triple-height ceilings, white walls and massive panels of glass add to the home’s contemporary style. The large residence was arranged to accommodate the family of six currently, but it is also designed to be flexible for the family’s future needs when the youngest children leave the nest. Each wing has a distinctive use but can be converted into separate living areas in the future. The designers also focused on using natural materials to create a strong connection to the surroundings. From interior rock walls to water features, plus bridges that join several pocket gardens, the Hovering Gardens House has an incredibly soothing atmosphere. + Niraj Doshi Design Consultancy Via ArchDaily Images via Niraj Doshi Design Consultancy

View post:
‘Hovering’ gardens passively cool this energy-efficient home

Spains first Passivhaus nursing home generates surplus energy

May 13, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Spains first Passivhaus nursing home generates surplus energy

Madrid-based design studio CSO Arquitectura has completed Spain’s first Passivhaus-certified nursing home in Camarzana de Tera. Built as an expansion of the nursing home that the firm had completed in 2005, the new addition provides additional bedrooms and stronger connections with the outdoors. The new, airtight building is also equipped with solar panels to power both the old and new buildings. Conceived as an “energy machine”, the new nursing home extension boasts a minimal energy footprint thanks to its airtight envelope constructed from a prefabricated wooden framework system. The prefabricated components were made in a Barcelona workshop and were then transported via trucks to the site, where they were assembled in one week. This process reduced costs and construction time and has environmentally friendly benefits that include waste reduction. Related: Spanish elderly care center wrapped in a pixelated green facade The new construction is semi-buried and comprises three south-facing “programmatic bands” linked by a long corridor. The first “band” houses the daytime services and a north-facing greenhouse with planting beds for the residents. The two remaining sections consist of the bedrooms, each of which opens up to an individual terrace and shares access to a communal patio. Exposed wood, large windows and framed views of nature were key in creating a welcoming sense of home — a distinguishing feature that the architects targeted as a contrast to the stereotypical cold feel of institutions and hospitals. The new nursing home extension is topped with an 18 kW photovoltaic array along with 20 solar thermal panels and rooftop seating. When combined with the building’s airtight envelope, which was engineered to follow passive solar strategies, the renewable energy systems are capable of producing surplus energy, which is diverted to the old building. The Passivhaus-certified extension also includes triple glazed openings, radiant floors, rainwater harvesting and mechanical ventilation equipped with heat recovery.  + CSO Arquitectura Photography by David Frutos via CSO Arquitectura

See the original post here: 
Spains first Passivhaus nursing home generates surplus energy

This modular, off-grid design can adapt to any landscape

April 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This modular, off-grid design can adapt to any landscape

DIY home design is a life-long dream of many, and today’s architects are making it easier than ever to build your own home without toiling for years. Genoa-based firm  TEKE Architects  has just unveiled the MU50, a modular  off-grid home  designed to be configurable to virtually any landscape. Using modules of prefabricated timber frames that can be connected in various layouts, the innovative design is meant to be incorporated into any landscape with minimal impact. The MU50 design is meant to be a feasible solution to sustainable and convenient modern  home design . According to the architects, a basic principle of the innovative home design was to create a modular, highly-flexible system that incorporates reusable and recyclable materials that would ensure minimal environmental impact across the board. The modular frames and enclosure panels, which are prefabricated off-site, are easily delivered on-site where they can be installed in just a few days, depending on size. Related: This ready-made tiny home can be shipped to any destination Part of the design includes a severe pitched overhang roof made out of three possible building materials, either wood, aluminum or copper. As one of the design’s many passive features, the roof offers several climate control features. First, the underside of the roof includes tight thermal insulation and waterproofed panels. Secondly, the large overhangs shade the interior spaces. The roof will also be installed with  solar panels,  which depending on the location and size of the home, should provide sufficient energy to power the entire house. The living space is designed to be an open plan that allows for optimal natural lighting and air ventilation. No matter what the size, the system’s modular pods allow for  maximum flexibility , meaning minimalists can create the tiny home of their dreams, and families can create larger spaces that are suited to their individual needs. This flexible system also allows homeowners to adjust their living space to their changing needs throughout the years. Additionally, the home can run off-grid in any number of climates or terrains thanks to several active and passive climate control features. The modular frames are designed to be elevated off the landscape to allow for air circulation below its base. With proper building orientation, custom windows with double-paned glazing, and piston-operated pine sunshades, the home’s interior is protected from harsh sunlight and heat. In terms of active sustainable systems, the home design is created to run solely on solar power, but additional clean energy-generating systems can be used as well, such as a water collection system. Additionally, ground source heat pumps and underfloor heating create optimal  energy-efficiency  for the beautiful home design. + TEKE Architects Via Archdaily Images via TEKE Architects

Here is the original post: 
This modular, off-grid design can adapt to any landscape

Costa Rican eco-lodge is made of reclaimed wood from a 100-year-old home

April 20, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Costa Rican eco-lodge is made of reclaimed wood from a 100-year-old home

Costa Rican architectural firm Gussa has unveiled a peaceful eco-lodge located on the country’s beautiful Caribbean coastline. Esquina Verde is a cozy rental accommodation made out of locally sourced materials and reclaimed wood salvaged from a 100-year-old home. Surrounded by lush vegetation and native wildlife, the lodge’s multiple hammocks that hang from the thatched roofs make it an idyllic place to disconnect. Located just outside of Cahuita National Park in Limon, Esquina Verde is a serene retreat that provides park visitors with a place to stay while they explore the area. The indoor/outdoor nature of the two bedroom, two bathroom guest house lets guests completely immerse themselves in the tropical forest backdrop, which is home to some incredible wildlife. Related: Sustainable eco huts built on stilts in an idyllic French pine forest Inspired by the natural setting, the architects wanted the project to reflect and protect the environment. The first step was to repurpose loads of reclaimed wood that was salvaged from a 100-year-old home being demolished near the site. This timber was originally imported from the U.S. to be used in the island’s banana plantations. The rest of the lodge was almost entirely prefabricated off-site in San Jose. Once delivered to the lot, it was put together using a simple bolt system that held the steel frame in place. To protect the structure from the region’s infamous heavy rains and high humidity, the lodge incorporates several resilient design features. Esquina Verde has multiple connecting volumes, all of which are elevated off of the landscape to reduce the impact on the terrain . The lifted building also protects itself from flash flooding, which commonly occurs in this part of the country. The eco-lodge is arranged around a central courtyard with a small swimming pool. The main structure, which is two stories, features a wide thatched roof and a wrap-around porch, where guests can enjoy views of the lush tree canopy. Underneath the roof overhangs, floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors open up completely to provide air circulation and a deeper connection to the environment. + Gussa Images via Gussa

Originally posted here: 
Costa Rican eco-lodge is made of reclaimed wood from a 100-year-old home

Office building uses 112 ‘smart’ chimneys to regulate light, air and energy

April 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Office building uses 112 ‘smart’ chimneys to regulate light, air and energy

Mario Cucinella Architects has created a sustainable public building that uses several active and passive elements to lower its environmental footprint. Specifically, the new timber-clad headquarters for the Regional Agency for Prevention, Environment and Energy (ARPAE) uses a soaring rooftop made up of 112 smart chimneys to regulate its air, light and energy so that the building relies on minimal technical systems. At more than 53,000 square feet, the immense public works building features a central courtyard. Its cladding is made up of thin timber panels that top a ground floor with floor-to-ceiling glass panels, creating a natural harmony with its woodland surroundings in the small city of Ferrara, in northern Italy. Related: 3D-printed home inspired by a wasp’s nest is made of local clay The architect chose the building’s materials based on their ability to help the structure reach a “maximum level of environmental sustainability.” Mario Cucinella explained, “The building in Ferrara explores the relationship between form and performance, that makes it the first hybrid public building in Italy.” The stand-out characteristic in the design is, without a doubt, its eye-catching rooftop, which is comprised of 112 chimneys. An essential element in regulating the building’s energy use, each chimney features a skylight that lets natural light and air filter down into the spaces below. Some of the chimneys feature solar panels that generate ample energy for the building. The passive building system also acts differently in the summer and winter months. During the hotter months, the chimneys constantly move air through the interior, creating a healthy working space for employees and visitors. In the winter months, they operate more like a greenhouse, where they accumulate solar heat to keep the spaces warm. All in all, the unique system helps the building enjoy a comfortable temperate year-round all while reducing energy demand. + Mario Cucinella Architects Images via Mario Cucinella Architects

See original here: 
Office building uses 112 ‘smart’ chimneys to regulate light, air and energy

Reclaimed wood home resembles barns in Sonoma Valley

April 3, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Reclaimed wood home resembles barns in Sonoma Valley

California firm Faulkner Architects has unveiled a beautiful, modern farmhouse that pays homage to the rural vernacular in California’s beautiful Sonoma Valley. Clad in salvaged redwood and weathered steel, the Big Barn House features a stunning design that incorporates several passive features to boost its energy efficiency. Earlier this year, the team from Faulkner Architects completed another project for the same family — a converted 1950s tack barn that was used by the homeowners while awaiting completion of the larger project. Using salvaged wood on the small barn conversion set the tone for the main residence. Related: 6 barns converted into beautiful new homes From its robust wood exterior to the modern, light-filled interior, the 3,900-square-foot home boasts a breathtaking design. Wrapped in reclaimed redwood and corrugated weathered steel, the two-story dwelling stretches out over a slightly sloped landscape. From afar, the asymmetrical gabled rooftop stands out over the undulating terrain. Built into a gentle slope, the modern farmhouse extends dramatically from a flat landing to the far end of the structure, which  slightly cantilevers over the landscape. This design was strategic to reduce the project’s impact on the site . According to the architects, the home’s orientation was also determined by the path of the sun. To help reduce heat gain during the summer months, the designers ensured that the smaller side of the roof faces the west, where the sun is the most intense. Alternatively, the east side of the home takes full advantage of natural light. Here, sash windows and glazed sliding doors provide a seamless connection with the surrounding nature. The ground floor houses the central social spaces: a massive kitchen and dining space and an open-plan living space with double-height ceilings. For added time in the sun, the far end of the home includes an all-glass enclosure that looks out over the incredible landscape. Accessible via an exterior walkway or central staircase, the second story is home to the master suite and two additional bedrooms. In addition to its strategic orientation, the Big Barn House boasts a number of energy-saving features . Throughout the space, multiple openings allow for ample air ventilation to help cool the home naturally. For the chilly months, radiant floor heating keeps the living spaces nice and toasty. To maintain comfortable interior temperatures year-round, the house also has tight insulation. + Faulkner Architects Via Dezeen Photography by Joe Fletcher (exterior images) and Ken Fulk (interior images) via Faulkner Architects

Original post:
Reclaimed wood home resembles barns in Sonoma Valley

Green-roofed Honey Bee Research Centre targets LEED Gold

March 25, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Green-roofed Honey Bee Research Centre targets LEED Gold

Toronto-based architecture firm Moriyama & Teshima Architects has unveiled renderings for the new Honey Bee Research Centre, a state-of-the-art research and education facility for promoting honeybee health and awareness that’s slated for completion next month. Developed for the University of Guelph, Ontario College of Architecture, the new center will not only host scholars and researchers, but also welcome visitors of all ages from around the world to its multifunctional Discovery and Learning Space. The project’s mass-timber architecture is reflective of its sustainable mission and will target LEED Gold certification. The Honey Bee Research Centre (HBRC) spans 19,200 square feet to include research and events programming both inside and out. The building will seamlessly blend into its natural landscape with an accessible green roof featuring a trail that leads to an Interpretative Tower, a public space that doubles as a solar chimney. Inside, the adaptable building will emphasize flexibility to adjust to the needs of the center for years to come.  Related: Urban Beehive Project creates a buzz around honeybee education “Designed to high energy performance and LEED Gold standards, the mass timber HBRC will be a demonstration of sustainability, reinforcing the importance of climate change and its relationship to the vital role of honey bee health and well-being,” the architects explained. “The facility will utilize passive design techniques and features such as natural ventilation, a high performance envelope and mechanical systems, and landscape features such as rain gardens and a green roof system.” As a research center and home for honeybees , HBRC will host working hives and agricultural plots. To further the notion of a “productive and social landscape,” both the rooftop and surrounding grounds will be planted with pollinator-friendly flora and edible gardens to sustain “Pollinator Pathways” for local species such as bees, butterflies, birds and more, while providing attractive gathering spaces for employees and visitors alike. + Moriyama & Teshima Architects Images via Moriyama & Teshima Architects

See more here:
Green-roofed Honey Bee Research Centre targets LEED Gold

Nature-inspired home uses passive design to stay cool in Taiwan

March 12, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Nature-inspired home uses passive design to stay cool in Taiwan

Just outside Kaohsiung’s city center, Taiwanese architecture firm Chain10 Architecture & Interior Design Institute has completed Comfort in Context, a contemporary new home nestled in a lush hillside. Crafted as a respite in nature, the building is set far back from the road and is wrapped in floor-to-ceiling glazing to take in mountain views. Nature also informed the design and orientation of the home, which relies on cross breezes and strategically located roof eaves to stay naturally cool while minimizing the use of electricity. Though strikingly contemporary in appearance, the design of Comfort in Context relies on age-old passive design principles for providing a comfortable living environment year-round. Oriented east to west, the home features a facade that mitigates unwanted solar gain at all times of the day while taking advantage of southwesterly winds to combat Taiwan’s hot and humid summers. In winter, the neighboring hills protect the building from cold winds. Related: Modular materials make up an eco-friendly restaurant in Taiwan “Nature doesn’t have to be the second thought for an architect in 2020, it must always be his or her first,” the firm explained. “The earth isn’t getting any better and everyone needs to do everything they can to reduce the emissions of their projects.” To further reduce the carbon footprint of the home, the architects planted a number of Taiwanese beech trees around the property. Environmentally friendly recycled materials were also used for the building structure, facade, finishes and interior. By building with the existing landscape to minimize site impact, the architects were able to reduce construction costs. As a result, more resources were diverted to the clients’ most important space in the house: the open-plan living room, dining area and kitchen that occupy a large part of the ground floor. The upper floor contains a spacious master bedroom, secondary bedroom, two atriums and five balconies. + Chain10 Architecture & Interior Design Institute Photography by Moooten Studio / Qimin Wu via Chain10 Architecture & Interior Design Institute

Go here to see the original: 
Nature-inspired home uses passive design to stay cool in Taiwan

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 5903 access attempts in the last 7 days.