Trump admits humans have "some connectivity" to climate change

November 23, 2016 by  
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On Tuesday, President-elect Donald Trump seemed to soften his stance on climate change . As we’ve reported before, he’s called it a hoax invented by the Chinese , and pledged to renege on the US’s commitments under the Paris climate agreement . Yet when asked by a New York Times reporter about his stance this week, he hedged on whether human activity could be connected to climate change, saying, “I think right now … well, I think there is some connectivity. There is some, something. It depends on how much.” Trump went on to say that he would be keeping an “open mind” about the Paris accord , seeming to completely contradict his campaign promises to withdraw from the treaty. He emphasized his belief that the agreement would render US companies noncompetitive and referenced the 2009 “Climategate” email scandal in an attempt to discredit the science behind global warming. (While some of the emails involved certainly didn’t show individual scientists in the best light, it’s worth noting that fact-checking organizations have found the claim that these emails prove manmade global warming to be a hoax are unfounded .) This isn’t the first campaign statement he’s attempted to walk back since the election. During the Times interview, he also seemed to lose his enthusiasm for prosecuting Hillary Clinton for her private email server. He even dialed back his support of torture tactics like waterboarding in the fight against ISIS, along with his proposal to completely scrap the Affordable Care Act. And while Trump himself hasn’t abandoned the idea of building a massive border wall with Mexico, Congressional Republicans are beginning to question whether it would really be a practical national security measure. Related: China to Trump: Climate change is not a hoax While the fact that he seems to be moderating his more extreme promises could be seen by some as a promising sign, the fact that his policies are shifting so quickly isn’t likely to make progressives feel relaxed or secure any time soon. After all, this is a politician who has been recorded blatantly lying throughout his campaign . Who’s to say any of these supposed changes of heart are actually true? Via the Washington Post Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

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Trump admits humans have "some connectivity" to climate change

8 ways to help the water protectors at the Standing Rock Reservation

November 23, 2016 by  
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As the world watches the Dakota Access Pipeline protests and the horrific police attacks that have injured hundreds of people , you may be wondering what you can do to help. Despite President Obama calling for a halt to construction to the DAPL pipeline in September to explore a new route, the company behind the 1,172-mile-long underground pipeline is forging ahead with construction anyway – in defiance of the president’s orders . Meanwhile hundreds of activists fighting for clean water have faced violent resistance and brutal attacks by local police , including police attacks this past weekend with rubber bullets, freezing water and tear gas that left 26 people hospitalized and hundreds injured . If you want to support the water protectors but are feeling helpless, know that you CAN make a difference from your home through phone calls, donations, and social media . You can even close accounts at banks financing the pipeline or go to North Dakota to stand with the protesters . Here are eight ways to help the Standing Rock activists. Support the protesters financially on GoFundMe and FundRazr So far people have donated over $1.5 million on Sacred Stone Camp’s GoFundMe campaign , but with winter coming they still need donations. Campaign organizer Howaste Wakiya says money will go towards necessities like food and blankets, means of power generation like solar panels , and winter gear like wood stoves and teepee liners. As protesters are arrested, the activists also need help with legal defense; you can contribute at FundRazr . If you’d like to donate a physical item Sacred Stone Camp has a list of supplies they need on their website and an Amazon wishlist . Related: Dakota Access Pipeline protesters raise over $1 million on GoFundMe Sign 21 different petitions at Change.org You can make your voice heard on the issue through numerous petitions online. Change.org has a ” Stop the Dakota Access Pipeline ” movement page with 21 different petitions. There you can sign the Rezpect Our Water petition started by Standing Rock youth or petitions targeted towards the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and President Obama . Call President Obama, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and North Dakota governor Jack Dalrymple Let the president know how you feel about the Dakota Access Pipeline. You can call the White House at (202) 456-1111 or at (202) 456-1414. You can send an email here or send a letter to The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC, 20500. You can call the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at (202) 761-0011, fill out a contact form on their website, or write to Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 441 G Street NW, Washington, DC, 20314. You can also reach out to North Dakota governor Jack Dalrymple at (701) 328-2200 or via his website’s contact form . You can write to him at Office of Governor, State of North Dakota, 600 East Boulevard Avenue, Bismarck, ND, 58505. Call or email Energy Transfer Partners executives Tell Energy Transfer Partners executives to stop building the pipeline . TheFreeThoughtProject.com provided contact information for three Energy Transfer executives . You can call Executive Vice President Lee Hanse at (210) 403-6455 or email him at Lee.Hanse@energytransfer.com. You can call Vice President Glenn Emery at (210) 403-6762 or email him at Glenn.Emery@energytransfer.com. Both men can be written to at 800 E Sontera Boulevard #400, San Antonio, Texas 78258. You can also call Lead Analyst Michael (Cliff) Waters at (713) 989-2404 or email him at Michael.Waters@energytransfer.com. You can write to him at 1300 Main Street, Houston, Texas, 77002. Join a local peaceful protest You can search Facebook events under #NoDAPL to find an event near you, or organize your own peaceful protest at ActionNetwork.org . Peacefully protest or close accounts at banks financing the pipeline Multiple large banks are financing the Dakota Access Pipeline, including Citibank, Wells Fargo, and the Bank of America. According to Food & Water Watch Senior Researcher Hugh MacMillan who spoke to Amy Goodman of Democracy Now! , there are numerous banks from around the world involved. Find out if your bank is funding the pipeline in Democracy Now!’s interview or in this article by Yes! Magazine . If you bank with an institution financing the pipeline, you could consider closing your account, peacefully protesting at bank locations, or contacting bank executives. Create a #NoDAPL Solidarity video to share on social media If you can’t travel to North Dakota yourself, you can show solidarity on social media outlets like Facebook and Twitter. On the Sacred Stone Camp’s Solidarity with Standing Rock Tumblr page, you can upload a video or picture with the hashtag #NoDAPL showing your support. A Tumblr account is not necessary to post to the page. Raise money creatively, such as through a bake sale What if you want to donate but don’t have much extra money to spare? The author’s friend held a bake sale and garage sale at her home in California and raised nearly $400 for Sacred Stone Camp’s GoFundMe. You just might have a few items lying around you don’t need anymore and could sell or donate; or if you’re crafty or love to bake you might be able to make items to sell to raise money. Share your ideas and the ways you’ve either raised money or supported the movement on social media with Inhabitat on Facebook , Twitter , and in the comments section of this post. + Standing Rock Sioux Tribe + Sacred Stone Camp Images via Fibonacci Blue on Flickr ( 1 , 2 , 3 ), Sacred Stone Camp GoFundMe , screenshot , Lars Plougmann on Flickr , Carl Wycoff on Flickr , Sacred Stone Camp Facebook , and Wikimedia Commons

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8 ways to help the water protectors at the Standing Rock Reservation

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