What we know so far about countries’ 2020 climate commitments

December 5, 2019 by  
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The stakes are high — how can we ensure the new nationally determined contributions raise confidence that we are on track to a 1.5 degree C world?

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What we know so far about countries’ 2020 climate commitments

COP25: Diving into the first Blue COP

December 5, 2019 by  
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There’s a new tide of global awareness rising about the critical role of our oceans in climate mitigation and adaptation.

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COP25: Diving into the first Blue COP

Four questions answered on the US leaving the Paris Climate Agreement

November 18, 2019 by  
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One question — what does the U.S. exit mean for curbing climate change?

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Four questions answered on the US leaving the Paris Climate Agreement

America chose the path to self-destruction. What about the rest of us?

November 7, 2019 by  
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Don’t mourn. Organize.

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America chose the path to self-destruction. What about the rest of us?

America chose the path to self-destruction. What about the rest of us?

November 7, 2019 by  
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Don’t mourn. Organize.

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America chose the path to self-destruction. What about the rest of us?

Demand from first-time, repeat buyers powers new era of large-scale renewables growth

November 7, 2019 by  
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The fall gathering of the Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance brings fresh faces and fresh ideas.

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Demand from first-time, repeat buyers powers new era of large-scale renewables growth

World leaders’ commitments fall short at UN Climate Action Summit

September 25, 2019 by  
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“We are running out of time,” said Oxfam International executive director Winnie Byanyima.

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World leaders’ commitments fall short at UN Climate Action Summit

Where the 2020 candidates stand on climate change

July 9, 2019 by  
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Climate change was predicted to be a hot topic for the first democratic presidential debates. Despite pressure from activists , the issue received just seven minutes of airtime on the first night of the debates and eight minutes on the second night. Still, it is important to be informed on where each person stands when it comes to the climate crisis. Below is a breakdown of the candidates’ current climate platforms (in no particular order). Jay Inslee (Governor, WA) Inslee has established himself as “the climate candidate.” Vox’s climate reporter went so far as to say that other candidates should simply adopt Inslee’s climate plan as their own platforms, as it is the only plan that adequately address the gravity of the crisis. Inslee’s Our Climate Movement plan includes: • Eliminating carbon emissions by 2045 • Investing $9 trillion in clean energy , green jobs and resilient infrastructure • Phasing out fossil fuel production Joe Biden (former Vice President) On June 4, Biden released a $1.7 trillion Clean Energy Revolution plan, which includes: • 100 percent net-zero emissions by 2050 • Investing in resilient infrastructure • Committing to the Paris Agreement • Spurring economic growth and green jobs Biden’s platforms are generally more moderate than other candidates, and he is wooing the labor unions. While some activists are sour about his appeal to moderate votes, others believe his ability to garner bipartisan support and labor votes may make him more effective in pushing through legislation. On June 27, Biden signed a pledge to refuse campaign money from oil companies. Elizabeth Warren (Senator, MA) Warren’s main focus is taking down big banks and big oil companies, including protecting public lands from oil corporations. She backed the Green New Deal , supports a ban on fracking and wants to focus on green job development and industries. She has also presented a plan to greatly reduce emissions produced by the military. Amy Klobuchar (Senator, MN) Klobuchar backed the Green New Deal and supports further development of nuclear energy as an alternative to dirty fossil fuels . Her proposal, released on March 28, includes a major investment in infrastructure adaptation and clean energy. She will also reinstate clean power rules and gas mileage standards and will rejoin the Paris Agreement. Seth Moulton (Representative, MA) Moulton backed the Green New Deal, plans to focus on green jobs and supports further innovation in carbon sequestration with farmers and rural communities. Kirsten Gillibrand (Senator, NY) Gillibrand co-sponsored the Green New Deal and avidly supported a carbon tax in the past. She opposes opening new land and water to oil drilling and supported legislation that would help the U.S. surpass its previous Paris Agreement commitment. Tim Ryan (Representative, OH) Ryan has defended his moderate stance on climate change and commitment to prioritizing jobs development and economic growth. He is critical of a carbon tax, arguing it would encourage companies to take jobs overseas. Pete Buttigieg (Mayor, South Bend IA) Buttigieg supports the Green New Deal, nuclear energy and a ban on fracking. He wants to focus on solutions that center low-income Americans and mentioned putting rural communities at the forefront of climate adaptation, such as supporting carbon sequestration innovation among farmers. He is also in favor of a carbon tax. Buttigieg would recommit to the Paris Climate Agreement and plans to decarbonize transportation and industries as well as support energy efficiency in homes. Marianne Williamson (author) Williamson wants to close existing nuclear power reactors and ban fracking. She supports the Green New Deal. Tulsi Gabbard (Representative, HI) Gabbard has been outspoken about climate action during her time in Congress. She supports aspects of the Green New Deal, including reaching carbon neutrality, but does not support nuclear power unless there is a solution for nuclear waste. She also supports a ban on fracking. Bill de Blasio (Mayor, New York City) Mayor de Blasio recently passed New York City’s own version of a Green New Deal, so he is expected to be an advocate for progressive climate action. Kamala Harris (Senator, CA) Harris has not taken a firm stance on a fracking ban, nuclear energy nor a carbon tax. She has come out in support of the Green New Deal and promised to rejoin the Paris Agreement. Joe Sestak (former Representative, PA) Sestak’s climate plan includes rejoining the Paris Agreement, ceasing subsidies for fossil fuel corporations, implementing a carbon tax and investing in regenerative agriculture . Bernie Sanders (Senator, VT) Sanders’ climate platform on his campaign website promises to: • Pass the Green New Deal • Invest in infrastructure for front-line communities • Reduce transportation-related pollution • Ban fracking and drilling • End exports of coal, gas and oil Corey Booker (Senator, NJ) Booker officially backed the Green New Deal, supports nuclear energy and wants to ban fracking. He also has an outspoken commitment to climate justice and to addressing the disproportionate impact that the climate crisis has on people of color and low-income families. Beto O’Rourke (former Representative, TX) O’Rourke has a $5 trillion climate plan that aims for net-zero emissions by 2050, but he still supports natural gas. His plan also includes $1.2 trillion in grants for energy and economic transformation at the community level. John Hickenlooper (former governor, CO) Hickenlooper previously worked as a geologist for a major oil company. He has not signed on to the Green New Deal and believes the U.S. should continue fracking. His climate plan includes: • Rejoining the Paris Agreement • Making $100 billion available annually in climate finance • Establishing a climate corps national service program Michael Bennet (Senator, CO) Bennet believes the U.S. should continue using natural gas and has not signed on the Green New Deal. On May 20, he released a climate plan with eight points: • Create 10 million green jobs by 2030 • Launch a 2030 climate challenge to push states to develop climate plans • Conserve 30 percent of land and oceans by 2030 • Establish a climate bank with $1 trillion to spend on infrastructure by 2030 • Cut energy waste in half by 2040 • Achieve 100 percent clean emissions by 2050 • Decarbonize agriculture • Develop options for houses to purchase retrofits, renewable energy and zero-emissions vehicles Andrew Yang (entrepreneur) Yang’s website mentions support for fossil fuel regulation and investment in renewable energy both for the environment and for the economy.  He also favors a carbon tax and dividend but believes much of the climate action needs to happen at the state and local level, with general support from the federal government. Steve Bullock (Governor, MT) Bullock said he would rejoin the Paris Agreement and invest in renewable energy; however, he does not support the Green New Deal nor does he think it will get very far. Bullock also has a long record of supporting the coal industry in his home state of Montana.  Wayne Messam (Mayor, Miramar FL) When pressed for his ideas about the climate crisis, Messam told radio station WBUR that he would develop an infrastructure bill that focused on resilience for bridges, dams and levees. He would transition the country to renewable energies and transition fossil fuel jobs toward the green economy. John Delaney (former Representative, MD) Delaney supports nuclear power and does not support the Green New Deal. He released a $4 trillion dollar climate plan that includes: • Establishing a carbon tax • Promoting negative emissions technology • Increasing renewable energy budget • Developing a climate corps national service program • Creating a pipeline network that delivers carbon dioxide to oil fields for sequestration Julián Castro (former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development) Castro supports the Green New Deal and was one of only three candidates to say climate change will be the No. 1 priority of his presidency. He has mentioned that his first action as president would be to rejoin the Paris Agreement, and he is opposed to subsidizing oil corporations. Greenpeace developed a report card to grade all candidates on their climate policies. See the visual here . Via Politico , Inside Climate News , NRDC and Greenpeace Images via Shutterstock

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Where the 2020 candidates stand on climate change

These cities in red and blue states are accelerating clean energy

June 5, 2019 by  
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Movement from Albuquerque to Orlando is making an impact despite U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Agreement.

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These cities in red and blue states are accelerating clean energy

Glenwood Springs, Colorado set to run on 100 percent renewable energy

May 30, 2019 by  
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Like many cities around the world, Glenwood Springs, Colorado has set a goal to run on renewable energy . But instead of picking a date a year or two ahead, they’re going renewable now. As of June 1, Glenwood Springs is the seventh U.S. city to run on 100 percent renewable electricity. “Many cities and towns across the country have set aggressive targets, and we are doing our part now — our future is now,” Glenwood Springs Mayor Jonathan Godes told the Post Independent . Related: India will surpass Paris Agreement pledges with renewable energy investment In April, the Glenwood Springs City Council resolved to move entirely to wind power supplied by Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska (MEAN). They’ve since modified this commitment to include seven percent hydroelectric renewable power. Signing a contract is not usually a public event, however, the city decided to celebrate the move to renewable energy by signing the contract at Glenwood Caverns Adventure Park, a theme park perched atop Iron Mountain with an elevation of more than 7,000 feet. Since Glenwood Caverns is a city electric customer, it will be the one of the country’s first amusement parks to be powered by 100 percent renewable energy. “Protecting the environment and natural resources has been our primary goal since we gave our first cave tour in May 1999,” Glenwood Caverns Adventure Park owner Steve Beckley told the Post Independent. “Sustainable tourism is an important issue these days and this move is a huge step in the right direction for Glenwood Springs as a whole.” To celebrate the signing, the park gave free gondola rides to visitors and the first 50 attendees received free LED light bulbs. The city will save money with the new contract, dropping the per-megawatt hour cost from $51 to $46 and saving Glenwood Springs a half million dollars per year. However, the city will be constructing a new electrical substation that will cost approximately $2.5 million. The other six cities that are already running on 100 percent renewable energy are Aspen, Colorado, Burlington, Vermont, Georgetown, Texas, Greensburg, Kansas, Rock Port, Missouri and Kodiak Island, Alaska. Via The Hill Image via inkknife_2000

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Glenwood Springs, Colorado set to run on 100 percent renewable energy

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