This is what ‘responsible’ climate lobbying looks like

April 4, 2022 by  
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The new Global Standard on Responsible Climate Lobbying offers detailed suggestions for how companies can ensure their lobbying aligns with the Paris Agreement.

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This is what ‘responsible’ climate lobbying looks like

How do you redesign your supply chain in a chaotic world?

April 4, 2022 by  
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What keeps our fraying world connected? At the moment, our supply chain is a good bet.

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How do you redesign your supply chain in a chaotic world?

6 stops on the roadmap to net zero emissions for the apparel sector

March 4, 2022 by  
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These actions can deliver 60 percent of the emissions reductions needed for the industry to stay in line with the Paris Agreement.

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6 stops on the roadmap to net zero emissions for the apparel sector

New study charges oil companies with greenwashing

February 17, 2022 by  
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Many people have listened with skepticism as major oil companies have touted clean energy and made net zero pledges. And they’re right to doubt the fossil fuel giants, according to a new study that concludes there’s a lot of  greenwashing  going on. “The clean energy claims of BP, Chevron, ExxonMobil and Shell: A mismatch between discourse, actions and investments,” was published in PLOS ONE on Wednesday. After examining records and analyzing data from the four titular oil companies, the researchers determined that oil exploration is increasing rather than decreasing. While the companies more and more frequently bandy about the terms “low-carbon,” “climate” and “transition,” concrete action plans are scant. Related: ExxonMobil plays dirty to deny role in the climate crisis “Financial analysis reveals a continuing business model dependence on fossil fuels along with insignificant and opaque spending on  clean energy ,” the researchers wrote. Which is the opposite of what the companies claim and what every country that signed the Paris Agreement allegedly supports. The three study authors, Mei Li, Jusen Asuka and Gregory Trencher, are affiliated with Japanese universities. “If they were moving away from fossil fuels we would expect to see, for example, declines in exploration activity, fossil fuel production, and sales and profit from  fossil fuels ,” Trencher said, as quoted in The Guardian. “But if anything, we find evidence of the reverse happening.” He compared the oil companies to naughty schoolboys who promised teachers to do their homework but just slacked off. Spokespeople from all four companies answered the study with more of the same.  ExxonMobil  framed its commitment in an especially noncommittal way. According to a spokesperson, “The move to a lower emission future requires multiple solutions that can be implemented at scale. We plan to play a leading role in the energy transition, while retaining investment flexibility across a portfolio of evolving opportunities, including for example carbon capture, hydrogen and biofuels, to maximise shareholder returns.” Unfortunately, the shareholders won’t find much to spend their returns on once the planet heats up past the point of habitability. Via The Guardian Lead image via Pexels

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New study charges oil companies with greenwashing

Eco-friendly and safe ways to dispose your cooking oil

February 17, 2022 by  
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Cooking oil comes from plants, yet it is difficult to return to the environment in an eco-friendly way. Because of the consistency of the liquid, canola, vegetable, corn, olive, avocado and other oils can create an oily coating on plants, which restricts oxygen intake. It also has a negative effect on animals too.  Even if you choose a type of cooking oil that is better for your body, getting rid of it creates challenges. The solution to the problem depends heavily on where you live and what resources are available in the region. Here are some of our methods. Related: 15 fresh ideas for leftover fruit that will reduce your food waste Don’t dump cooking oil down the drain For starters, understand where you shouldn’t get rid of cooking oil. Never dispose of it down the sink or toilet drain. There are several reasons for this, starting with the fact that oil can and will clog drains within your home’s plumbing. It can happen quickly or take awhile to accumulate, but eventually the build up will affect water flow. After the oils are flushed out of your home, they either go into a septic tank or are diverted to a local treatment plant. Not all particles are filtered out at the plant, resulting in the greasy substance being released back into the path of plants and animals that need fresh water.  Reuse the oil Some people are surprised to find cooking oil can be used multiple times. Choose a storage container. Glass jars work well. After cooling the oil, filter and hold onto it for next time. For deep frying foods like meat or fish, you can reuse the oil up to four times. For lighter foods , such as potatoes, you may get up to eight uses out of the same oil.  Cool it However you decide to dispose of your oil, make sure it is completely cooled before sending it away. You can freeze oil to make the process less messy or save it for later use. Even putting it into the fridge or outside on a hot pod during cold weather will drop the temperature for proper disposal.  Receptacle disposal In many areas, the garbage can is the best, and perhaps only, place to get rid of cooking oil. Rather than simply pouring used cooking oil directly into the garbage, however, corral it in a non-recyclable container. If you don’t have a location to return plastic film, such as grocery and bread bags, you can use those bags to collect the oil. You’ll need to be careful not to puncture the plastic and double-bagging is a good idea. You can also use non-recyclable milk cartons, broth containers or other vessels that seal tightly.  Local restaurants, fire stations or recycling center s Connect locally to see what restaurants in your area are doing with their oil waste. Some may be recycling through a service that converts it into oil for other uses, such as fueling cars.  Also check in with a nearby fire department. In many areas, the fire department coordinates recycling cooking oil, as well as other hard-to-recycle items around the house.  Your local waste disposal company is another resource. Give them a call to ask about options. Even if they don’t provide a regular drop-off location or curbside pickup service, they may have an option a few times each year in conjunction with chemical roundup events.  Consider compost ing Some say adding cooking oil to the compost bin will make worms and insects happy. Others say it will attract unwanted animals , especially if the oil was used to cook fragrant meats. There does seem to be a balance where small amounts of plant-based oils benefit the compost ecosystem. To be safe, only add oils that were used to cook vegetables and other non-animal foods. Also, add oil to the compost in moderation. Too much oil will create a layer that stifles out oxygen in the mixture.  Create solid waste Part of the reason oils are challenging to dispose of is simply because they are so messy. You can combine the oils with other waste materials around your home, however, to result in solid waste that is easier for you and waste management professionals to deal with.  Before tossing your oil, mix it with absorbent materials such as sawdust . You can also mix it with other kitchen waste like flour. If you have cats, dump the used oil into the kitty litter when it’s time for a cleanout. The same goes for guinea pig or rabbit cages. Sand makes another nice absorbing-material option.  Make soap out of it Soap relies on fat, so it makes sense you can include high-fat cooking oils in the soap recipe. You’ll want to purify dirty oil before adding it to the mix, but blending in olive, soybean, avocado, almond and other oils provides you a way to recycle it and save money on soap-making supplies. It also keeps used cooking oil out of the garbage can and the landfill.  Make an insecticide The same reason that oil can limit oxygen and suffocate animals makes it an ideal ingredient in insecticides. Combined with soap and water, oil helps prevent insects from ruining crop development.  While you might find yourself dealing with used cooking oil from time to time, you can collect small amounts for an extended period before finding the best way to dispose of it.  An even better approach is to limit the amount of oil you use in the first place. Avoid oil waste by using an air fryer, baking goods or cooking on the grill instead.  Via Act Enviro and Green Matters Images via Pexels

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Eco-friendly and safe ways to dispose your cooking oil

Can a 700 million dollar pledge save the Great Barrier Reef?

February 1, 2022 by  
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The Australian government will channel $700 million (AUD 1 billion) toward the protection and rehabilitation of the Great Barrier Reef . The announcement by Prime Minister Scott Morrison came on Friday, just a few days before UNESCO’s February 1 deadline requiring Australia to provide a detailed reef conservation report. In July, the reef narrowly escaped being placed on UNESCO’s danger list due to climate change threats. UNESCO allowed the Australian government more time to enact reef protection measures and submit a report. Failure to act would lead to the reef being delisted as a World Heritage site, among other consequences. Related: Coral reef collapse could be coming to the Indian Ocean “We are backing the health of the reef and the economic future of tourism operators, hospitality providers and Queensland communities that are at the heart of the reef economy,” Morrison  said  in a statement. The funds will help finance a roughly decade-long program to improve reef health. Key areas of concern include water quality management, protection of important species and biodiversity , among others. While the Australian government has pledged its largest-ever amount for reef protection and conservation , questions still abound. Action only came after sufficient pressure from public figures and environmental groups. On July 13, public figures wrote a joint letter urging global leaders to act fast to save the Great Barrier Reef. “We urge the world’s major emitters to undertake the most ambitious climate action under the Paris Agreement ,” the letter read. “There is still time to save the Great Barrier Reef, but Australia and the world must act now.”  People have also questioned the announcement’s timing. In May, Australia will have a general election. Many think the recent move is a campaign strategy. The Australian Climate Council also criticized the announcement, saying that just funding the reef is not an adequate solution. “Unless you are cutting emissions deeply this decade the situation on the Reef will only get worse,” said Professor Lesley Hughes of Macquarie University. The Great Barrier Reef remains the world’s largest reef, covering approximately 133,000 square miles. The reef is home to about 1,500 types of fish and over 400 types of coral . Over the past decades, the climate crisis has devastated the reef’s health. A study published in October 2020 shows that the reef has lost up to 50% of its coral population in the last three decades. Via CNN Lead image via Pexels

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7 countries vow to end new oil and gas exploration

November 12, 2021 by  
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Yesterday at  COP26 , seven countries and one Canadian province joined forces as the Beyond Oil and Gas Alliance. BOGA members committed to stop exploring for and producing  oil  and gas. Since none of the seven is a major oil or gas producer, the pledge seems more symbolic than practical for solving the climate crisis. But  Costa Rica , Denmark, France, Greenland, Ireland, Sweden, Wales and Quebec are bravely taking the lead as BOGA’s core members. Portugal, New Zealand and California were dubbed associate members for their “significant, concrete steps” in reducing oil and gas production. Related: Will promises from world leaders at COP26 actually happen? “If we want to address the climate crisis, we need a managed but decisive phase-out of oil and gas production,” said Andrea Meza, the minister of environment and energy of Costa Rica, in a statement. Costa Rica — which doesn’t produce oil or gas — and Denmark founded and are co-chairing the new alliance.  Denmark  is the European Union’s biggest oil producer, but that’s not saying much, as they produce less than 1% of the United States’ 2019 oil output. In addition to ending exploration and oil drilling, BOGA members have promised to decrease all fossil fuel production in line with the  Paris Agreement  timeline. Lars Koch of ActionAid Denmark said BOGA presented a test for oil-producing countries. “If they don’t become members of this alliance, what they are actually saying is, ‘We don’t mean what we say about 1.5,’” he said, as reported by Grist. “It is just pure, deep greenwashing.”  Despite a lot of nice words in Glasgow, most of the world’s major economies are still on track to produce way more oil, coal and gas than the Paris Agreement  global warming  target can bear: about 110% of that target, according to a report the United Nations released last month. In the U.S., the Biden administration plans to open 80 million acres in the Gulf of Mexico to drilling next week and to lease huge tracts of public lands for new gas and oil development early next year. So, uh, how are we cutting  emissions  in half by 2030? Via Grist Lead image via Pixabay

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7 countries vow to end new oil and gas exploration

How Your Organization Can Buy Paris Agreement-Verified Rainforest Carbon Credits for the First Time

October 20, 2021 by  
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Date/Time: November 18, 2021 (1-2PM ET / 10-11AM PT) As governments step up efforts to strengthen the Paris Agreement at COP26 and tackle the climate emergency, corporate action has never been more critical. Join our webinar and learn how, for the first time, corporations can achieve carbon neutrality, protect tropical rainforests, and directly support the global climate agreement. Formalized in Article 5 of the Paris Agreement, the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+) Mechanism was designed to “slow, halt and reverse forest cover and carbon loss” globally. The initiative has led to sequential declines in emissions and helped protect over 90% of the world’s tropical rainforests for over two decades. Previously only available through the UNFCCC to governments and multilateral banks, Paris Agreement-verified rainforest carbon credits can now be purchased directly from countries by corporations, institutional investors, and consumers.  In March this year, Papua New Guinea was the first country to join a new trading platform called REDD.plus when it onboarded 9 million metric tons of carbon reductions. These credits will be followed by over 110 million tonnes from Belize and Gabon in the next twelve months. Join the webinar and learn about: Natural-based solutions and how they can help tackle the climate emergency The global rainforest conservation initiative UNFCCC REDD+ mechanism, and how effective it has been Paris Agreement-verified REDD+ rainforest carbon credits, and what makes them high quality How corporations can purchase UNFCCC REDD+ carbon credits Moderator: Jim Giles, Carbon Analyst, GreenBiz Group Speakers: Kevin Conrad, Executive Director, Coalition for Rainforest Nations Federica Bietta, Managing Director, Coalition for Rainforest Nations Peter Boyd, Advisor, REDD.plus & Resident Fellow, Yale Center for Business and the Environment Mark Grundy, Director, Marketing & Communications, Coalition for Rainforest Nations If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast.

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How Your Organization Can Buy Paris Agreement-Verified Rainforest Carbon Credits for the First Time

Advice for scaling nature-based carbon removal programs

August 24, 2021 by  
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Sponsored: Carbon removal is an important and immediate part of the many actions companies are taking to reach the aims of the Paris Agreement.

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Advice for scaling nature-based carbon removal programs

China’s new emissions trading has transformational potential

August 24, 2021 by  
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China’s sheer population size means it is already the largest absolute emitter.

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China’s new emissions trading has transformational potential

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