Nature: the one partner every company should work with

March 14, 2019 by  
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Natural capital stewardship like restoring forests could deliver almost one-third of the emissions cuts needed to stave off global temperature increases.

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Nature: the one partner every company should work with

Earth911 Podcast, March 11, 2019: Sustana Group Aims for 100% Paper Recycling

March 11, 2019 by  
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The Sustana Group is a pioneer in paper recycling. The … The post Earth911 Podcast, March 11, 2019: Sustana Group Aims for 100% Paper Recycling appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth911 Podcast, March 11, 2019: Sustana Group Aims for 100% Paper Recycling

6 eco-friendly ways to incorporate hemp into your daily routine

February 19, 2019 by  
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After decades of “reefer madness”, the misinformation about Cannabis is finally starting to disappear, and the truth is coming out about the many benefits of the magical plant. However, many still don’t know the difference between cannabis, marijuana and hemp , and continue to believe they are one and the same — but, they are not. So, what are the many uses of hemp? Read on to find out. In a nutshell, cannabis is a family of plants that have two major classifications: Cannabis Indica and Cannabis Sativa. Marijuana, which is what people consume to get the effects of THC, can come from either Indica or Sativa. While hemp only comes from Cannabis Sativa. Because marijuana and hemp come from the Cannabis Sativa plant, they definitely have a lot in common. But, there are significant differences. Without getting too detailed about the differences between plant structure, marijuana has THC — which is what gives it psychoactive properties — and people grow it for recreational and medicinal use. Hemp is grown for industrial purposes because it can be used to produce everything from clothing to biofuel. Hemp has minimal amounts of THC, so it doesn’t get you high. However, like marijuana, it does have CBD which can be used for medicinal purposes. Simply put, hemp is a Cannabis Sativa plant that is not a drug and doesn’t get you high. Instead, this amazing plant is used to make a variety of amazing products. Just last year, President Trump signed a bill legalizing hemp at the federal level, which means the industry is ready to explode. Here are the many uses for hemp. Related: Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport incorporates natural fibers into body design Clothing Not only is hemp fiber absorbent and lightweight, but it is strong, weather resistant, versatile, eco-friendly and extremely cost-effective. Hemp fiber is three times stronger than cotton, and the differences in farming cotton and hemp are extraordinary. Hemp crops require half the water, they don’t need fertilizers or pesticides  and there is almost zero waste because you can use every part of the plant. Hemp plants also absorb more CO2 than trees, and it grows so quickly that it one acre can produce tons of fiber in just four months. Before reefer madness started in the 1920s, “80 percent of clothing was made from hemp textiles .” Oral hygiene Swishing hemp oil around in your mouth for a few minutes every day can strengthen your teeth and gums, heal bleeding gums, prevent gingivitis and help with bad breath. Hemp oil is anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and an antifungal agent. So, it can not only prevent cavities and tooth decay, but also repair damaged teeth . Body oil and lotions Hemp oil and lotions can give you soft skin , but that’s just the beginning. They can moisturize your skin without clogging pores, as they contain essential fatty acids like Omega 3 and Omega 6 to give your skin a healthy glow and the amino acids help prevent wrinkles. Hemp oil and lotion is loaded with anti-aging vitamins and minerals that boost skin elasticity, treat acne and keep the skin hydrated. Hemp products are also effective for skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis. Paper When hemp production was made illegal in the early 20th century, it put an end to the use of hemp paper, which was widely used throughout the 1800s. Hemp paper is high quality because of the high cellulose and low lignin content, and it is more eco-friendly than tree paper because it can be produced faster. In a 20-year cycle, one acre of hemp can produce just as much paper as ten acres of trees because trees take decades to grow, while hemp stalks take just four months. Hair products As good as hemp can be for your skin, it can also do amazing things for your hair. Shampoos and conditioners made from hemp oil will moisturize and nourish your hair and scalp, making it perfect for keeping dandruff away. Hemp oil can also strengthen your hair to prevent breakage and stimulate the production of keratin, which is the protein that makes up the majority of your hair . Wood finish Hemp oil can revive the wood in your home and give it an excellent finish. You can use it on wood floors, furniture, cabinets and molding, and the age of the wood doesn’t matter. It can revive old furniture or give an amazing, dark finish to new wood that is stained or bare. Hemp oil is also an excellent top coat for painted wood furniture. This list is just the beginning. Hemp can also be used for other products like biofuel, food  and even as a plastic alternative. Now that a major legal hurdle has been overcome in the United States, consumers will likely see more hemp-based products than ever before. Images via Shutterstock

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6 eco-friendly ways to incorporate hemp into your daily routine

Breaking America’s Paper Towel Addiction

February 18, 2019 by  
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It’s common knowledge that Americans use more disposable items than … The post Breaking America’s Paper Towel Addiction appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Breaking America’s Paper Towel Addiction

Survey Results: Plastic or Paper Food Packaging?

November 21, 2018 by  
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Thanks to those of you who responded to last week’s … The post Survey Results: Plastic or Paper Food Packaging? appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Survey Results: Plastic or Paper Food Packaging?

Recycling Mystery: Milk and Juice Cartons

November 14, 2018 by  
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The process of recycling our paper and plastic materials is … The post Recycling Mystery: Milk and Juice Cartons appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Recycling Mystery: Milk and Juice Cartons

A tale of two fibers: How to spot sustainable paper

November 5, 2018 by  
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Sponsored: In the growing move toward recycled papers, many people are surprised to learn that there are two types, and one is a lot more sustainable than the other.

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A tale of two fibers: How to spot sustainable paper

What do the SDGs mean for business now?

February 7, 2018 by  
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International Paper, JPMorgan Chase, Novozymes and Tata may not have a lot in common on the surface, but each company is determined to tackle key U.N. Global Goals.

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What do the SDGs mean for business now?

Why Silicon Valley should take ag tech more seriously

February 7, 2018 by  
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Barely 2 percent of all U.S. venture capital investments in 2017 were focused on solving agricultural challenges.

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Why Silicon Valley should take ag tech more seriously

Birds called ‘firehawk raptors’ are intentionally spreading fires in Australia

January 10, 2018 by  
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When you think of causes of fire in Australia , you might think of lightning or arsonists – but you probably don’t think of birds . But at least three birds of prey species spread wildfires in Australia, according to a new paper incorporating indigenous knowledge. Penn State University geographer and lead author Mark Bonta told National Geographic , “We’re not discovering anything. Most of the data that we’ve worked with is collaborative with Aboriginal peoples…They’ve known this for probably 40,000 years or more.” ‘Firehawk raptors’ – the Black Kite ( Milvus migrans ), Brown Falcon ( Falco berigora ), and Whistling Kite ( Haliastur sphenurus ) – spread fire by carrying burning sticks in their beaks or talons. They can transport fiery sticks up to around one kilometer, or 0.6 miles, away, staring fires where the flames haven’t yet burned. And while indigenous people have known about this behavior for a long time, this new study published in the Journal of Ethnobiology late last year documenting the knowledge and around six years of ethno-ornithological research could help overcome what the paper abstract described as “official skepticism about the reality of avian fire-spreading.” Related: Carnivorous marsupial alive and well after being presumed extinct for 100 years “Intentional Fire-Spreading by “Firehawk” Raptors in Northern Australia,” Bonta et al. Journal of Ethnobiology, 37(4) (abstract): https://t.co/JJVomc5zDy #ethnobiology #ethnoornithology #birds #fire pic.twitter.com/Bv4oSA6BpC — Bob Gosford (@bgosford) January 1, 2018 Why would these birds of prey set fires? According to National Geographic, the blazes could help them find food as small animals and insects attempt to escape the fire. Co-author Bob Gosford told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation in 2016, “Black kites and brown falcons come to these fronts because it is just literally a killing frenzy. It’s a feeding frenzy, because out of these grasslands come small birds, lizards, insects, everything fleeing the front of the fire.” And it’s important to dispel skepticism so officials could better plan land management and restoration. The researchers hope their paper will help with fire ecology and fire management that takes into account these fire-spreading birds. Via ScienceAlert and National Geographic Images via Depositphotos ( 1 , 2 )

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Birds called ‘firehawk raptors’ are intentionally spreading fires in Australia

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