Designers made this pavilion out of upcycled paper waste

October 14, 2019 by  
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Originally created for the Copenhagen Art Fair to showcase a new sustainable method of design, the Paper Pavilion is made out of upcycled paper collected from the city itself. The art fair, in its fifth season, had a specific focus on pavilion designs that spotlighted sustainable construction , urbanization and recycling.  The pavilion was created by Denmark-based Japanese architects, PAN- PROJECTS. The architects wanted to combine sustainability with the appropriate amount of durability for their Paper Pavilion design, making sure to sacrifice the longevity of the structure whenever possible for the utilization of the materials that would only withstand through the duration of the three-day event. With this methodology in mind, PAN- PROJECTS decided to use paper as their primary building material due to its strength and recyclability . Additionally, the use of paper adds a certain aspect of uniqueness that sets the Paper Pavilion apart from similar projects at the Copenhagen Art Fair. Related: Mud and recycled materials make up this sustainable Kerala home The designers also took inspiration from the shape of a bagworm moth for the pavilion, taking into account especially the insect’s nesting habits of collecting local materials into a particular shape. The concept will hopefully encourage spectators to find a connection between the natural shape of the moth-inspired design to the urban environment that surrounds it. Moreover, the papers that helped create the paper pavilion were collected from around the city, so the connection between the city’s inhabitants to the artistic structure should provide additional insight. Following the Copenhagen Art Fair, the piece was relocated permanently to the entrance hall inside the Kunsthal Charlottenborg Museum in Copenhagen with slight redesign to fit the new location. The paper used in the piece can be recycled again after the structure comes down, as well. + Pan- Projects Via Archdaily Images via Pan- Projects

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Designers made this pavilion out of upcycled paper waste

Celebrate the second International E-Waste Day

October 14, 2019 by  
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Thanks to its inaugural success last year, the second International E-Waste Day will be observed on October 14, 2019. The day is meant to raise awareness for proper disposal of electrical equipment and electronic devices worldwide. The International E-Waste Day was developed by Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Forum to promote reuse and recycle practices. Consumers are encouraged to proactively increase rates of repairing appliances for recovery and reuse, recycling devices and properly disposing of electronics . Related: Lawmakers are pushing gadget manufacturers with the Right to Repair movement Consumption of computers, phones, other digital devices and household appliances continues to grow rapidly. Often replaced and discarded, this electronic waste, or e-waste, is a big problem for the planet. Ecological repercussions accompany the heightened demand for electronics. Producing this technology exacerbates mining and depleting natural reserves to procure raw materials. E-waste accumulates, threatening the environment with toxic pollution and contamination hazards. The mess can only be alleviated with plans that enable reuse, repair, resale and recycle initiatives. Global estimates project 50 million tons of e-waste will be generated this year. But only a fifth of that will be recycled, while the rest is placed in landfills, burned or illegally treated. Consequences include tremendous losses to valuable supply chain materials. Moreover, negative health, environmental and societal issues arise from irresponsible e-waste management . Collectively, the WEEE Forum implements high-quality standards for e-waste “collection, handling, storage, transport, preparation for reuse, processing and disposal.” Its proprietary software allows member groups and partners to document recycling and recovery quotas to benchmark operations. Similarly, the nonprofit has provided policy recommendations for improved optimization across its member groups. This year, the International Telecommunications Union, a United Nations agency, is partnering with WEEE Forum to ensure global reach. More than 100 member organizations across 40 countries worldwide are expected to join in on activities as part of the second International E-Waste Day. Pascal Leroy, director general of the WEEE Forum, said, “There are many countries worldwide that are currently in the process of implementing e-waste legislation. We are therefore very pleased to have participants from six continents involved in this year’s International E-Waste Day.” Established in 2002, WEEE Forum addresses broadscale e-waste management. The nonprofit is the largest multinational organization harmonizing exchanges of best practices and knowledge on e-waste operations (collection, logistics and processing). To date, the WEEE Forum encompasses 36 producer responsibility groups from 25 countries. Representing the United States, at the moment, are Tennessee’s TERRA (The Electronics Reuse & Recycling Alliance) and Michigan’s VCER (Valley City Electronics Recycling). Whether you repair, reuse , resale, recycle or just spread the word this International E-Waste Day, don’t forget to do your part for the planet. + WEEE Forum Image via Volker Glätsch

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Celebrate the second International E-Waste Day

Stunning green-roofed home in Poland is embedded into the idyllic landscape

October 14, 2019 by  
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Lush green rooftops are becoming more and more common within the architectural world, but this gorgeous house in a remote area of Poland is truly an example of next level green goodness. Designed by architect Przemek Olczyk from Mobius Architekci , the Green Line is a stunning family home that has been almost entirely tucked into its landscape and covered with a thick layer of greenery. Located in the remote region of Warmia, in northern Poland, the 5,380 square-foot family home sits on an expansive landscape of rolling hills covered in wildflowers. The idyllic setting inspired the architect to create a home with a lush green roof and unique architectural form that follows the silhouette of the surrounding landscape. Related: Rural Italian home clad in lush greenery blends into its idyllic surroundings Hence, the Green Line home is embedded into the terrain, only leaving its pitched roof to jut upwards from the ground level. In addition to creating a beautiful home design that is respectful to its topography, the home’s unique design also pays homage to the vernacular found in the region. The gabled peaks of the roof , for example, are made out of wooden lamella detail, a nod to the traditional cottages found in the area, which often have decorated wooden boards arranged in various patterns. Another nod to the local traditions is the home’s unique L-shaped layout, which was inspired by the local farms in the area. However, more than just eye-pleasing aesthetics, the home’s many vernacular features pull double duty as sustainable passive tactics to reduce the home’s energy use. Just by embedding the home into the landscape increases the design’s thermal mass, reducing the need for air conditioning in the hot summer months or heat in the frigid cold winters. Additionally, the high pitched roof creates a light-filled double height space on the interior, opening up space for natural air circulation as well. The L-shaped design also helps protect the home from the heavy winds that kick up often due to the home’s proximity to a large lake. Although the home sits just slightly above the ground level, some strategic design savvy helped create a light-filled interior. Following the topography, the home’s main living area sits adjacent to a slight incline. Floor-to-ceiling glass walls allow for stunning views of the surroundings, as well as flood the living space with natural light . The home’s unique layout was also strategic to creating a comfortable living space. Within the layout, a large open-air courtyard was created to provide the family with plenty of space to entertain, dine and play. + Mobius Architekci Via Dwell Photography by Pawe? Ulatowski

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Stunning green-roofed home in Poland is embedded into the idyllic landscape

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