Panasonic is building an incredible smart city outside of Denver

January 8, 2018 by  
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Panasonic is just about everywhere you look these days, from car batteries to airplanes, and now the company is building one of their most ambitious projects yet: an entire smart city . Called CityNow, the futuristic city is rising up outside of Denver and will be a living lab experiment for creating towns that can survive a disaster, run on clean, renewable power, and contain sustainable infrastructure that improves people’s lives. The development has been underway for the past two years in a desolate patch of land near the Denver airport. The 400-acre project will be a transit-oriented city, with light rail connecting it to Denver and the airport, smart roadways that are perfect for autonomous vehicles, parking management, and autonomous shuttle routes, which roll out this spring. Related: Bill Gates buys a huge chunk of land in Arizona to create a ‘smart city’ The city also has a bevy of sustainable features, like a solar panel microgrid that can power the city for days in the event of a disaster. Streets lights consist of power-saving LEDs and a carbon neutral district. “Since early 2016, when we started on Denver CityNow, we’ve vetted 11 technology suppliers, developed an open API, established a carbon-neutral district, got approval from the public utility and installed the first microgrid, with solar panels on Denver Airport property, in partnership with Xcel Energy, which can power this area for 72 hours in the event of a natural, or manmade, disaster,” Jarrett Wendt, EVP of Panasonic Enterprise Solutions told PC Magazine . Panasonic’s first foray into a sustainable smart town in Fujisawa, Japan, has resulted in a city with 70 percent less carbon dioxide than normal, a return of 30 percent back to the grid, an EV charging grid, and enough renewable energy to power the city for five days off-grid. Denver’s smart city is slated for completion in eight years, and Panasonic hopes to see the same, if not better, results. Via PC Magazine Images via Panasonic

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The worlds first ski-in/ski-out treehouse cabins open in Montana

January 8, 2018 by  
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As brutal weather continues to unload icy fury in the northeast, those looking to carve white powder in the Midwest may want to head to the world’s first ski-in/ski-out treehouses . Located in the winter wonderland that is Whitefish Mountain Resort, the newly opened Snow Bear Chalets let you ski straight up to the front doors, which are located 30 feet off the ground. The resort offers three magical treehouse chalets located on the Whitefish Mountain Ski Resort’s Hope Slope. The wooden structures are built 30 feet above the forest and offer stunning views of Glacier National Park. The ski-in/ski-out cabin are the first of their kind – and they’re the only lodgings located directly on the ski run just few steps from the ski lift. When ready to hit the slopes, guests can hop straight onto the white powder. When there’s no snow, nature lovers can get their fix either hiking or biking the mountain’s hundreds of miles of trails. Related: Green-roofed 2022 Winter Olympic center echoes the surrounding ski slopes The cabins offer the ultimate in a luxury hygge-filled getaway . Guests can spend days filled with downhill skiing in one of the most picturesque ski areas in the world, and nights by the fire with a steaming cup of hot chocolate. The treehouses offer extremely cozy interiors with fireplaces, large kitchens and large windows to enjoy the stunning views. The three cabins range in sizes, but are all equipped with large treetop decks and outdoor hot tubs, along with various luxurious features. And if you’re into stargazing, the cabins even come with turrets and ceilings covered in constellations made up of 600 fiber-optic stars. + Snow Bear Chalets Via Curbed Photography via Snow Bear Chalets

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The worlds first ski-in/ski-out treehouse cabins open in Montana

Singapore’s giant vertical farm grows 80 tons of vegetables every year

February 10, 2017 by  
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This vertical farm in Singapore grows a whopping 80 tons of veggies every single year. The farm was founded by Panasonic , and it uses LED lights to quickly and efficiently grow produce indoors without depending on unpredictable weather conditions. Panasonic believes indoor farming is a key to the future that could solve food supply issues worldwide. Panasonic started their indoor farm in a 2,670 square foot space and initially produced 3.6 tons of vegetables per year. But the company’s Agriculture Business Division assistant manager Alfred Tham recently told Business Insider that the farm has quadrupled its square footage and food output. Related: Futuristic Japanese indoor vertical farm produces 12,000 heads of lettuce a day with LED lighting Vertical farming allows Panasonic to make the most of the warehouse space, although they do grow their plants in soil in contrast to many vertical farms. They source their LED lights from a local company. Rather than depending on sunlight or rain showers, the farmers can control the indoor farm’s climate – including pH levels, temperature, and oxygen. 40 varieties of crops grow in the indoor farm – from mizuna to romaine lettuce, mini red radishes and Swiss chard. But the goal is to start cultivating 30 additional varieties by March of this year. Right now the flourishing farm accounts for just 0.015 percent of produce grown in the country, but Panasonic hopes to boost that statistic up to five percent. As Singapore currently imports more than 90 percent of its food, indoor farms could enable the island nation to become more self-sufficient. Panasonic is selling the indoor farm’s produce under the brand name Veggie Life, and a three ounce bowl of greens goes for around $5 in grocery stores. They also sell their produce to local restaurants. Via Business Insider Images via Panasonic ( 1 , 2 )

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Singapore’s giant vertical farm grows 80 tons of vegetables every year

Amazing green-roofed school melts into the mountains of France

February 10, 2017 by  
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In the 1960s, the Jean Moulin High School in Revin, France was artfully tucked into the town’s grass-covered hills. However, over the years, the old building began to fall apart due to neglect and severe weather. When the town decided to renovate the damaged structure they called upon Duncan Lewis Scape Architecture , who retained the school’s strong connection to nature with a series of tiered “forest balconies.” Although officials were open to various ideas for a new building, they were adamant that the design retain the strong symbiotic relationship between the manmade structure and its natural environment. However, the state of the original building was so bad that renovating the complex would have been a massive operation, especially considering the asbestos that was used in its construction. Accordingly, the project began by demolishing and rebuilding the entire complex, all while trying to maintain minimal impact on school activities. Related: Gorgeous Green-Roofed Marcel Sembat School Completed in France The volume of the school is divided into lateral rows made up of low-rise terraces that are gradually stepped into the mountain’s natural topography, covered in a dense vegetation of tall trees, bushes and ‘rock chaos’. Built onto the mountain bedrock, the building’s layout stretches out to the crest of the plateau, which overlooks the river below. The classrooms are located below the green terraced “strips” and, thanks to strategic orientation and an abundance of windows, have tons of natural light as well as beautiful panoramic views of the green valley below. The lowest part of the complex has a sports area with a running track, a smart gym, and indoor basketball, volleyball and handball court. On the interior, the school’s “Agora” also follows the natural slope of the site, with ramps on either side that lead to the classrooms and workshops. “La Place” is a community area used for breaks and recreation. According to the architects, the school’s “panoptical” design not connects it to its surroundings, but also serves as a strategic measure to help monitor the student body more efficiently. + Duncan Lewis Scape Architecture Via Archdaily Images via Duncan Lewis, Matthieu Tregoat, and Cyrille Weiner

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Amazing green-roofed school melts into the mountains of France

Artist transforms recycled materials into beautifully intricate, life-sized sculptures

February 10, 2017 by  
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At first glance, its easy to mistake artist Kate Kato’s works for the real thing. The Bristol-born artist of Kasasagi Design masterfully transforms recycled materials into life-like sculptures that capture the intricacies and beauty of plants, insects, and other found objects in nature. Each of her works, no matter how small, is an amazing undertaking of mixed media and art techniques, from wirework to carving. Inspired by a love of nature, Kato attributes her beginnings in art and the name of her design studio, Kasasagi, a Japanese word that figuratively refers to a person who obsessively collects things, to the time she spent as a child collecting random bits and pieces during her walks through the countryside. The artist works mainly with paper that she cuts out and carves from the books and magazines she collects, and she combines the medium with wire , thread, and fabric. From a distance, Kato’s artworks look startlingly lifelike, especially when presented in specimen boxes, but the truth unravels when a closer look reveals printed lettering or loose threads. Related: Japanese paper artist replicates amazing wild animals using intricately bound newspaper “I like to use materials in a way that provokes this curiosity in the viewer too by leaving sections of the original object visible in the new sculpture ,” writes Kato. “I want the sculptures to look real and not real at the same time inviting the viewer to consider details they may normally over look and stimulate curiosity for the made item and the real thing.” Kato hopes to encourage curiosity about nature and a greater awareness of the environment and our role in the ecosystem. + Kasasagi Design

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Artist transforms recycled materials into beautifully intricate, life-sized sculptures

Tesla just kicked off battery production at its massive Nevada Gigafactory

January 5, 2017 by  
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Tesla just took a big step towards realizing CEO Elon Musk’s vision of a sustainable energy future by kicking off the mass production of lithium-ion battery cells at its Gigafactory near Sparks, Nevada. Tesla has set an ambitious target of eventually producing 150 GWh of lithium-ion battery cells annually – enough batteries to support up to 1.5 million electric vehicles. Tesla also plans on manufacturing as many as 500,000 cars per year before 2020. There are more than 400,000 pre-orders for the Model 3 so the demand is certainly there. The electric vehicle maker and clean energy storage company partnered with Panasonic to design, engineer and manufacture the “2170 battery cell” (21 millimeters in diameter and 70 millimeters in length). The 2170 cells that began production Wednesday will be used in Tesla’s Powerwall 2 and Powerpack 2 energy products. The batteries for the Model 3 — the company’s first affordable EV, which is priced at $35,000 and expected to hit the assembly line this year — are set to start production in the second quarter. Tesla said that by 2018 the Gigafactory will produce 35 GWh/year of lithium-ion battery cells, “nearly as much as the rest of the entire world’s battery production combined.” The Gigafactory is being built in phases, with nearly 30 percent completed — a footprint of 1.9 million square feet. When the 10 million square foot structure is completed, Tesla expects it to be the biggest building in the world. A second Gigafactory is planned for Europe, with the location yet to be announced. Related: Panasonic investing $256M in Tesla’s Buffalo solar manufacturing plant While Musk has discussed how increasing automation will likely lead to a universal basic income for displaced workers, he is doing his part to create jobs. Tesla and Panasonic said they will hire several thousand employees this year and at peak production, the Gigafactory will employ 6,500 people and indirectly create another 20,000 to 30,000 jobs in the surrounding area. + Tesla + Panasonic Via Greentech Media Images via Tesla 1 , 2

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Tesla just kicked off battery production at its massive Nevada Gigafactory

Upcycling studio in Tel Aviv gives former prostitutes a second chance at life

January 5, 2017 by  
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Modern slavery is all around us—even if we don’t always see it. Human trafficking for the sex industry is one of the most insidious crimes, but one group in Tel Aviv is fighting against it to save lives and the environment. A.I.R.—which stands for “Act, Inspire, Restore”—is an international social enterprise that combines social purpose with an eco-friendly upcycling business to spread awareness about the black market activity and to give former prostitutes the skills and supportive community they need for a second chance at life. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyT7BS9V5Vs Founded by Swiss couple Tabea and Matthias Oppliger, A.I.R. turns reclaimed materials like pallets into custom wood furniture and other upcycled products. The social impact business is a branch of glowbalact , a Switzerland-based NGO aimed at ending modern-day slavery, particularly sex trafficking, in Switzerland and abroad. Tabea, a trained massage therapist, first got involved by offering free massages in Zurich brothels for three years to learn about the women working there, earn their trust, and give them a therapeutic experience. Her and her husband’s knowledge of the industry and desire to spread awareness eventually brought them to Tel Aviv, where an unexpected encounter with a woman who Tabea previously massaged in Zurich cemented their decision to start a social enterprise in Israel. Despite Israel’s mostly young and well-educated populace, the country is home to 12,000 women, men, and children who identify as sex workers. Over three-quarters of women surveyed by the Jerusalem Institute of Justice shared their desire to leave the sex industry but say they can’t due to lack of employable skills, financial debt, or coercion by pimps or former employees. The Oppligers founded A.I.R. two years ago and successfully launched their first workspace seven months ago in the city’s gritty but up-and-coming Florentine neighborhood. There, the couple is joined with a staff of social workers and business managers, and they currently work together with eight former sex workers who have signed on for a one-year training program to help them reintegrate into society. Related: Thailand’s $7.8 billion seafood industry is built on human trafficking and slave labor Created with the mission to restore people and materials, A.I.R. works primarily with turning discarded shipping pallets into stylish furniture, a process that Tabea says is very therapeutic. The Swiss-Israeli social enterprise creates custom furniture designs to generate a stable economic base and pays the women an hourly rate. Thus far, A.I.R. has installed their upcycled works in a variety of locations across the city including the rooftop patio of Abraham Hostel in Tel Aviv, and recently won a contract to outfit the interior of a new coffee shop. The foam cushions are covered with recycled billboard canvas, which is sturdy, waterproof, and often colorful. Since the upcycled pallet furniture is heavy and is only sold in Israel, A.I.R. was asked by supporters to produce a second upcycled product that could be easily shipped abroad. Thus, the team has recently started collecting discarded kites donated by kite surfers. The reclaimed materials are repurposed into waterproof bags and bibs under the label Kite Pride. “We’re trying to make art not waste,” said Tabea to Inhabitat. “We love the idea of upcycling and recycling. It has to be unique and this very colorful stuff is very therapeutic for the girls. One of the girls said ‘I’m just happy looking at the colors.’ Our constant battle is between being socially minded and the pressure of trying to get a business up and running. It’s very challenging. We offer social impact holidays to Germans and Americans and other young business people so that they can come for two and three weeks here and help out at A.I.R. Our goal is to be a jumping board for the career these girls have always wanted. We just give them stability and a protected environment and teach them a few things.” A.I.R.’s Kite Pride products will soon be available for purchase on their website and their upcycled pallet furniture is available for purchase and commission in Israel. The sale of these products helps spread awareness and will produce more jobs around the country. To learn more about human trafficking, you can watch a new sex trafficking movie “She Has A Name,” proceeds of which help support glowbalact. + glowbalact + Vibe Israel Tour courtesy of Vibe Israel Images © Lucy Wang , image of Oppligers © Amit Shemesh

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Upcycling studio in Tel Aviv gives former prostitutes a second chance at life

Tesla taps Panasonic to build solar panels for their Powerwall and Powerpack systems

October 17, 2016 by  
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Tesla wants to dip even further into the solar power pool with newly announced plans to partner with Panasonic to build solar panels for Tesla’s Powerwall and Powerpack battery backup systems . Panasonic has already been building Powerwall batteries, as well as electric car batteries, at Tesla’s sprawling Nevada Gigafactory , but this would be the electronics company’s first foray into solar panels with Tesla as a partner. There’s just one hitch: none of this can happen until Tesla’s $2.6-billion acquisition of SolarCity goes through, a move which has been plagued by legal hurdles and awaits a shareholder vote in November. If Tesla ‘s acquisition of SolarCity  is completed, Panasonic would quickly begin building photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules at SolarCity’s $750 million manufacturing facility in Buffalo, New York, which is incidentally also called a Gigafactory. In a statement, Tesla explained that the Panasonic-produced solar components would be sold as part of a “solar energy system that will work seamlessly with Powerwall and Powerpack, Tesla’s energy storage products.” Tesla has agreed to a long-term deal under which it would purchase PV cells from Panasonic, while providing the facility in which to build them. Related: Elon Musk plans to launch Tesla/SolarCity solar roof and Powerwall 2.0 on October 28 Tesla’s main motivation behind the partnership is to create a reliable source of low-cost PV cells designed to be integrated into its other products. “We are excited to expand our partnership with Panasonic as we move towards a combined Tesla and SolarCity,” said Tesla co-founder and Chief Technical Officer JB Straubel. “By working together on solar, we will be able to accelerate production of high-efficiency, extremely reliable solar cells and modules at the best cost.” The announcement of this product line comes on the heels of Tesla/SolarCity’s promise of a solar roof with integrated connections to the Powerwall storage system (and, of course, an included Tesla car charger). The official product unveil for the solar roof is set for October 28, despite the fact that Tesla’s acquisition of SolarCity won’t be a done deal before the shareholders vote on November 17. Via Engadget Images via Shutterstock and  SolarCity

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Tesla taps Panasonic to build solar panels for their Powerwall and Powerpack systems

INTERVIEW: Walking the High Line with its garden designer Piet Oudolf

October 17, 2016 by  
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Using patches of plants and swaths of grass as his paints, Oudolf has changed the way we think about gardens. INHABITAT: You’re thought of as a pioneer of the New Perennial movement. Can you explain what that is for people who are not familiar with that? OUDOLF: I would say it’s about a group of people who were interested in plants and gardening but in a way that was not traditional. In a way that would serve the plant instead of you, yourself. It came from an ecological approach where plants like to grow together in an environment that they like and instead of what we provide for the plants. It grew very slowly out of searching for another idea of garden design because everyone was fed up with all this sort of beauty of English gardens where you just plant flowers and you cut them up and plant them back and it just stays. I missed a certain continuity at that time and that’s why I met those people that came from wilder backgrounds – native plants and ecologists. Then my eyes opened a little bit, and I thought if I just use plants that have more than just the beauty of flowers, if I put them down a little bit more irregularly and drop a few plants here and there that look more spontaneous. That is, in short, how I started to change my mind and also using grasses , which no one did in English gardens. Grasses were forbidden in the border. We normally used them in the bigger landscapes and not as a gardener. Gardeners used probably grass in a pot or grass in the middle of the loam but nothing in the venues. I chased that idea with books about how to use grasses and perennials together and we had a nursery and we could already show how grass could look good with flowering plants. That’s how it started except that for the media they were looking for new ideas of gardening and they found us as a source for new pictures and new images for their magazines because our plantings looked very difficult. That helped also for people to appreciate what we were doing. It’s a very complex method and took at least 20 years, but it became very popular and well seen today. If you looked at this grass 20 years ago, people would say why don’t you cut it down or why don’t you cut it back, but today they say yeah. We showed people how you could use different plants and see beauty in something that probably was not seen as beauty. INHABITAT: How do you select plants differently from other gardeners? OUDOLF: I would say plants have color, and gardening is mostly based on color and decoration, but if you work outside your private realm, you notice that the color is only temporary for two weeks, three weeks and then if color is gone and there is no structure then you lose the whole idea of a good garden. We work with plants that at first place have good characteristics – structure or texture. Character in the sense that they look good and they have a good appearance, and then color is an extra thing. Color is to create an emotion or depth of anything you want after structure. Because you can imagine if you have a garden that is all in red that it has another whole expression when it’s only white. Red is more dramatic and white is more sort of silent, so we can play with colors and that comes on top of all the other things that are important. INHABITAT: When you began this new way of gardening, was there a lot of pushback? OUDOLF: There are a lot of people, maybe not garden designers but in the world of plants, a lot of people that were looking more ecologically at plants from the point of view of habitats, communities and I grew to know a lot of them and that is why my thinking started to change. I discovered that I could do something much deeper and nicer by following the sort of rules of what plants like… That I could work with plants that work well together and not just use plants that I like. INHABITAT: Instead of just choosing plants you want and forcing them to grow? OUDOLF: Yeah, it’s like you adjust the soil to the plant; we try to get the right plants for the soil we have but this is a different thing of course and we can bring in any soil but still the High Line is about communities, plants that live together and don’t push each other out. INHABITAT: Do you have a favorite part of the High Line? OUDOLF: There are many. I think the Northern Spur , these parts, the Chelsea Grasslands and then also at the end with the round benches and the flyover of course. It also depends on the season like when it’s autumn and the leaves turn color and you can have another specific area that you like most so it all depends on the seasons as well. The whole garden drives on seasonality and it’s not about the beauty of the flowers, it’s the beauty of the season. The Northern Spur, a bridge of plantings over 10th Avenue, is one of Oudolf’s favorite parts of the High Line. “We have very shallow soil here,” he explained. “This is one of the places where the soil is only this deep so it was one of the places where I had a big doubt about if anything would grow here for a longer period. I used the most aggressive plants here – aggressive in the sense that they are very strong and durable and you can see they are still doing well.” INHABITAT: What’s your process when you are selecting plants for a certain piece? OUDOLF: For the High Line , we have a narrative…a story that is told by the architects. We enter in a woodland situation and that opens up to metal and then continues into this water landscape or swamp landscape. We get the whole story from this sort of storybook and I translate that into plants. When I read a story of what I like, I get a picture in front of me and then for every part of the High Line I put together a sort of palette of plants; a sort of number of plants that could work in that character of what they have written down. It’s like a stage play and we have this play and in it needs so many people and he plays that character and the other plays that character. That’s how I put it together. I put them together in a palette and then I put them on paper but it’s a whole process that is very complex because it’s more that… I get the script and then translate that into what you see now. INHABITAT: Have you ever had an experience where you designed a garden and then came back and thought this is not what I was expecting or what I wanted? OUDOLF: Yeah, once I plant it and I leave, my work depends mostly on the gardeners afterwards because it’s not an architect who leaves the building and the building will be there for 100 years. When I leave the garden and it’s not taken care of, then you would lose it within two years; you lose the whole idea. It’s complicated because everything you see is sort of three dimensional but the gardener’s time is a big part of it too. We live in a time where things change and if you don’t realize that things change then you cannot do it right. You need to know that some trees will livee 50 years, some trees will probably die in the coming five years, you will never know but in a way you have got to keep that in mind. You have to be open for all the changes. INHABITAT: What have you learned over the years from visiting the High Line and seeing it evolve? OUDOLF: One of the things that you learn most from is where the garden runs over hundreds of houses or apartments or buildings. So one building is just a restaurant which is very hot, another building is just an apartment which is not too hot and then you have a part where it’s very cold and in the winter everything freezes to solid. That’s what you first learn that plants react strongly to those local climate changes, micro-climates. That’s why we lost so many trees because they run over warmer areas, they have got a very cold spell in February when the trees are already starting to grow and then the trees grew because they thought it was the coming spring. It’s the building underneath that heated them up and that’s how you lose plants but you have to accept it. INHABITAT: What are some tips that you have for gardeners or the biggest mistakes that you have seen or learned from? OUDOLF: For private gardeners and people who love plants, the biggest mistake is that you buy plants that you like on first sight. Instead of thinking about they will work in your garden. INHABITAT: Could you talk a little about your new book that’s coming out? It’s called Gardens of High Line . It’s with Rick Darke . It’s already up for pre-order on Amazon and will be out June 1st. INHABITAT: When you see people interacting with your work, are you surprised at how much people love it? OUDOLF: Yeah, I think gardening of plants is something that everyone has in them. You buy flowers to bring home, so there is something in you…why don’t you buy a brick for your wife? [Laughs] Because it has something sentimental and it has something that probably is in our genes that we love plants because we are attached to nature because we are part of it. When you bring this back, people are probably getting connected to what they don’t know; connected to something they don’t know about. I think it’s something that reminds them maybe of their childhood being in the wild with their parents or whatever. There is a longing for this connection of what I just said that plants connect with people in a sense that you don’t even have to go for it but when you are here it happens to you. The other way around is people longing for something that they have in mind that could help them opening their brains. Solve their problems with the world or the environment by opening themselves…that could help them in their future lives and how they take care of the world. I think it’s one of the biggest powers of nature and you connect yourself to that power stream. It’s like an electric current loading on. I can imagine – it did that to me. The only thing I can do in my work is find tools to express myself, that was the starting point. I felt so powerful that I could do something that will show people maybe how I am, the beauty I see in them. For me, it was a tool. + Piet Oudolf + The High Line Photos: Yuka Yoneda for Inhabitat This interview has been edited for brevity and clarity.

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INTERVIEW: Walking the High Line with its garden designer Piet Oudolf

Wild chimpanzee mothers teaching offspring to use tools captured on video for first time

October 17, 2016 by  
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Scientists have long known that animals use tools, but now for the very first time they’ve captured wild chimpanzee mothers on video teaching their children to utilize them as well. Researchers led by Stephanie Musgrave of Washington University in St. Louis filmed chimpanzees in the Republic of Congo at Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park. Before the video it was rare to see primates teaching their young, according to the researchers , and the new findings have exciting ramifications. Chimpanzee mothers employed a few different techniques to teach their offspring how to use probes made from herbs for termite fishing. In one video, the mother split her tool and gave half to her child, and they began to fish for termites together. In another video, after a chimpanzee child couldn’t get any termites using a tool, a chimpanzee mother gave it the tool she had been using and then changed the child’s probe so she could use it herself. A third video showed a mother giving a child her own probe before she left to find materials to make another one. In addition, chimpanzee children were captured asking their mothers for the tools. Related: Help move hundreds of chimpanzees from labs to a safe haven in Georgia According to Musgrave, sharing tools as some of the chimpanzee mothers did allows their offspring to learn about the form and material for successful probes. The mothers aren’t able to forage as much themselves when they share tools, but the offspring get the opportunity to practice termite fishing. As the mothers experienced reduced ability to work for the benefit of their young, the researchers can say the chimpanzees were indeed teaching. Another satisfied criteria is the chimpanzee children’s termite fishing improved as a result of the teaching. Musgrave told The Independent, “Studying how young chimpanzees learn the tool skills particular to their group helps us to understand the evolutionary origins of culture and technology and to clarify how human cultural abilities are similar to or different from those of our closest relatives.” In early October, Scientific Reports published the research prepared by Musgrove and four other scientists from institutes, conservation societies, and universities from the United States, the Republic of Congo, and Germany. Via The Independent Images via Wikimedia Commons and screenshot

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