Introducing Klima: the app on a mission to reduce carbon footprints

August 27, 2020 by  
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Released this month, Klima allows its users to take direct action against climate change with a simple and beautiful app. The user-friendly app quickly calculates your personal carbon footprint and finds ways to offset your emissions through an affordable monthly subscription that goes straight to carbon offsetting charities. Your carbon footprint is calculated through tailored lifestyle questions, including how many short or long flights you take per year, whether or not your home uses renewable energy, your eating habits and more. You can then see how your footprint compares to the national and global average. According to Klima, the national average is 16.5 tons of annual carbon emissions and the global average is 4.5 tons. Related: 14 apps to help you live a more sustainable lifestyle After the calculation is complete (it only takes a few seconds), Klima presents different subscription options that support nonprofit carbon offsetting programs based on your personal carbon footprint. Typically, this amount is less than $20 per month for the average American lifestyle. Causes range from reforestation programs in vulnerable places like Madagascar, Panama and Tanzania to solar power technology and research companies. Causes are fully transparent, with detailed project information and real-time impact data included. Klima only includes solutions that rank among the top 10 most effective ways to fight climate change worldwide, benefit the local communities and meet the highest international quality standards for certified carbon offsetting. Everything is verified through either the Verified Carbon Standard or the Gold Standard developed by WWF and similar NGOs. This way, users can support the nonprofits that they are most passionate about while creating their own carbon-neutral lifestyle, ensuring that their funds are going toward good causes. Best of all, Klima suggests specific tips that outline how much CO2 reduction a certain lifestyle change will result in, such as switching to green energy or going pescatarian. With every change you make to reduce your carbon footprint, the cost of your subscription decreases. The app itself has stunning graphics and contains a wealth of valuable information on carbon neutrality. The app and carbon calculator are both free to download, too, so you can still get started on your sustainable journey even if you’re not ready for a carbon offsetting commitment. + Klima Images via Klima

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Introducing Klima: the app on a mission to reduce carbon footprints

This private island resort in Panama promises sustainable luxury

November 19, 2019 by  
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Just off the western Pacific shore of Panama lies Isla Palenque , a private island sanctuary with nearly 400 acres of lush jungle and a luxury resort that prides itself on low-impact living. Unlike the traditional beach resort, Isla Palenque promises paradise for wildlife and nature lovers who are invited to explore a relatively undeveloped island — over half of the island has been set aside as a nature reserve. From jungle hikes to kayaking to cooking classes and birdwatching, all activities at the award-winning resort aim to cultivate a greater appreciation of Panamanian biodiversity. Created as part of the Cayuga Collection, a hotel group of sustainable luxury hotels and lodges in Central America, Isla Palenque gives guests of all ages the chance to experience “nature in the raw.” Amble Resorts founder and architect Benjamin Loomis designed the sustainably minded resort and deliberately kept its total development footprint to approximately five percent of the island while capping the guest count to 40 people at a time. Related: Sleep in sustainable luxury inside this eco-friendly jungle treehouse Isla Palenque is also a partner of the community-supported Dock to Dish sustainable fishing program and offers a reforestation program that invites guests to plant a primary rainforest seedling of their choice in an area of secondary growth. To further reduce the resort’s carbon footprint, locally sourced materials and ingredients are used wherever possible, from the wooden furnishings made on-site from naturally felled trees on the island to the locally grown ingredients used at the Las Rocas Bar & Restaurant. The onsite guided activities and excursions on and near the island — there are over 8 miles of hiking trails and seven accessible private beaches — that are included in the daily resort rates also emphasize a minimal environmental footprint. Guests can stay in one of Isla Palenque’s eight sumptuous Beachfront Casitas — romantic 650-square-foot bungalows that face the island’s largest beach, Playa Palenque — or choose among the Beachfront Villa Estates that include two Ocean Suites, three Jungle Rooms and a single Garden Room scaled with children and teens in mind. Rates at the Isla Palenque vary depending on the season. + Isla Palenque Images via Isla Palenque

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This private island resort in Panama promises sustainable luxury

Wear jeans on your eyes with these funky sunglasses made of upcycled denim

November 19, 2019 by  
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Who knew that “thigh wear as eye wear” would be the next big thing in the world of eco fashion? Founded by British inventor Jack Spencer, Mosevic has recently unveiled Shades of Denim, a collection of ultra-durable and super funky eyewear that is made out of upcycled denim mixed with resin. Mosevic, which is currently running a campaign on Kickstarter, started eight years ago when Spencer had the idea to turn floppy denim into solid denim in order to create an entirely new material. The innovative idea turned into a range of high-end, handcrafted eye wear, called Shades of Denim. Related: Designer Sophie Rowley creates marbled furniture from denim scraps The first step of the process is finding unwanted denim, which the company gets from a variety of sources. While it is open to finding other waste streams, most of Mosevic’s material comes from discarded jeans that are not fit for resale and old denim stock from clothing stores. Once the designer has enough material, the reclaimed denim pieces are then mixed with a strong resin that absorbs into the denim fibers. Pressing multiple wet layers of denim together, the resin becomes solid, creating a “solid denim.” The resin used in the process is completely skin-safe and has been tested over many years. Once Mosevic has the solid denim, the manufacturing process, which takes place in Cornwall, sees that the eyewear is handcrafted in small batches with careful attention to detail. The result is a gorgeous collection of sunglasses with sophisticated brass detailing. The glasses are rugged enough to withstand everyday wear and tear, but they are also lightweight and comfortable — just like your favorite pair of jeans. The sunglasses come in a variety of styles and start at £195 (approximately $250), and you can get them fitted with prescription lenses. But if you go to the Kickstarter campaign , you can enjoy up to 25 percent off retail. Additionally, the Mosevic website comes with a cool, virtual mirror feature to see which frames fit your face the best. + Mosevic Photography by Andrew Hilling via Mosevic

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Wear jeans on your eyes with these funky sunglasses made of upcycled denim

The Building Decarbonization Coalition’s quest to build an all-electric future

August 29, 2019 by  
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The organization’s founder and director, Panama Bartholomy, chats about the magnitude of the challenge and what it means for companies.

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The Building Decarbonization Coalition’s quest to build an all-electric future

14 spectacular lamps unveiled at the London Design Festival

October 6, 2017 by  
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Lighting designers are constantly pushing the envelope with new materials, technologies and applications – and this year’s London Design Festival was awash in innovative designs. From an air-purifying algae chandelier to a lamp powered by melting ice and a series of pendant lights made from mushrooms , read on for our favorite finds from this year’s shows. Exhale Chandelier by Julian Melchiorri When is a chandelier more than just a chandelier? When it’s literally alive! Julian Melchiorri ‘s ‘Exhale’ chandelier is filled with algae that absorb CO2 and release fresh oxygen into any interior space. It’s also incredibly beautiful, with delicate green ‘leaves’ that optimize sun exposure to help the algae grow. Frost Light by EDHV Studio EDHV Studio’s Frost Light is powered by melting ice! A chunk of ice is set on a block of solid aluminum, and as it melts it generates enough electricity to power a small LED for 3 hours. Reflection Room by Flynn Talbot Flynn Talbot’s Reflection Room is mind blowing. One side of the mirrored hallway is bathed in orange light, while the other is lit in blue. Where the two sides meet, a gradient of color is born. Fuchsia Lamps by Macmaster Design Macmaster Design ‘s new Fuchsia lamps look like hanging, flowers in bloom – and they’re made from FSC-certified black walnut and white oak. Voronoi III Lamp by Tala Tala just launched their largest sculptural light yet at the London Design Festival. The Voronoi III is inspired by patterns found in treetops, and its LED filament is modeled after the Fibonacci sequence. Tree Lights by Tamasine Osher Tamasine Osher ‘s gorgeous hand-turned Tree Lights are made of salvaged wood harvested from naturally fallen trees. The delicate patterns are caused by naturally occurring fungus that develops over a span of 2-3 years. I.Rain Helene Chandelier by Blackbody and Haviland Blackbody teamed up with Haviland to unveil a spectacular chandelier made from 145 OLED lights. Each light is nested within a porcelain cup embellished with “Matignon” white with gold patterns. Morphe Lamp by Crea-Re These beautiful lamps by Crea-Re look almost like colored stone – but they’re made from paper mâché! Maria Fiter crafts each lamp using recycled newspaper, natural pigments, and ecologically certified water-based glue. Lungplant by Tim van Cromvoirt Tim van Cromvoirt ‘s luminous Lungplant slowly expands and exhales like a living creature. He designed the lamp to reduce stress and create a meditative environment that encourages you to become aware of the tempo of your own breathing. Thea Kuta Lamp by Elisa Bortolussi These Thea Kuta lamps emerged out of Elisa Bortolussi’s desire to use yarn as an alternative tool for painting. The lamps are handmade from 100% wool, and their precise geometry and depth of color is dazzling. Mycelium + Timber Lamps by Sebastian Cox and Ninela Ivanova These lamps are made of mushrooms! Sebastian Cox and Ninela Ivanova found a way to pair mushroom mycelium with freshly cut wood waste to create a collection of sustainable furnishings. Stacked Glassware Lamps by New Citizen Design These beautiful pendant lights from New Citizen Design appear to be sculpted from glass – until a closer look reveals that they’re made of cups, bowls and plates! Designers Mayan Pesach and Sander Wassink salvage old glassware and combine it in unexpected ways – and each piece is unique. Panam Panama lamp by Lea Baert Lea Baert’s Panam Panama project transforms old fan grills into stunning lamps. Baert worked with communities of Panamanian craftspeople to develop the design using locally-sourced fibers. Upon returning to France, she updated the project with materials sourced locally in Paris. Atlas Light by Ladies & Gentlemen Studio Ladies & Gentlemen teamed up with Seattle-based artist and glass designer John Hogan to create the Atlas Light. This handcrafted lamp consists of an iridescent glass sphere flecked with gold leaf and set on a brass base. + London Design Week

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14 spectacular lamps unveiled at the London Design Festival

How Earth Day began and how it helps the planet

April 17, 2017 by  
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Earth Day is April 22nd, and to get prepared for the big day, here are a few Earth Day facts that you may not know. Founded by United States Senator Gaylord Nelson as an environmental teach-in, the first ever Earth Day was held on April 22nd, 1970. Earth Day not only marks the beginnings of moving toward a more sustainable world, it’s a time to come together and contemplate our global environmental situation, as well as participate in community and global “green” activities. Read on to find out all about this important eco-holiday . Earth Day is one of the most widely celebrated environmental events across the globe. The first Earth Day was focused on protesting an oil spill off the coast of California, but today, the focus is on increasing awareness of the planet and all the issues around its health, from fracking and water pollution to rainforest depletion and animal extinctions. More than 20 million people and thousands of local schools and communities participated in the first Earth Day of United States that took place on 22 April 1970, and one of the results of that first celebration was the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Clean Air Act. It became an international event in 1971, when UN’s Secretary-General U Thant spoke about it at a Peace Bell Ceremony at the United Nations in New York City. On that first celebration, NYC’s mayor shut down Fifth Avenue for use on Earth Day, and allowed it to be celebrated in Central Park. Today, over 1 billion people celebrate Earth Day around the world. Earth Day is celebrated in 192 countries. This day is a time dedicated to increasing awareness about the Earth, its issues and its problems, and people in different countries take action that will benefit their region the most. For example: On Earth Day 2011, the Earth Day Network planted 28 million trees in Afghanistan. On Earth Day 2012, more than 100 thousand people in China rode their bikes to save fuel and reduce CO2 emissions from motor vehicles. In Panama, in honor of Earth Day, they planted 100 species of endangered orchids to prevent their extinction. In 2014, NASA participated in Earth Day with the agency’s #GlobalSelfie event , asking people to take a photo of themselves outside and post it to social media using the hashtag #GlobalSelfie. We can all use Earth Day as a time to reflect on our personal impact on the environment. Simply implementing something that promotes sustainability, such as a weekly recycling regimen, can truly make a difference. Let’s use today as a starting point for great change, and make every day an Earth Day. + Vangel The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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For the first time, climate change has caused a river to completely reroute

April 17, 2017 by  
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For the first time on record, climate change has completely changed the route of a river. In a shift that researchers called “geologically instantaneous,” a river in Canada’s Yukon territory shifted from draining into the Bering Sea to draining into the Pacific Ocean below Alaska. What makes this particularly concerning is that while shifting rivers aren’t unheard of in the Earth’s history, never before to our knowledge has a river rerouted so quickly, causing an enormous impact on the surrounding environment. The Kaskawulsh glacier in Canada has been rapidly melting. That influx of meltwater choked out the Slims River, depriving the downstream Kluane Lake of water and causing it to drop rapidly. The water shifted to the Alsek River, which empties into the Pacific Ocean south of Alaska, where the ocean water will now see a rapid influx of freshwater. The shift began in 2016 when the melting water burst through an ice dam, depriving Slims River of its glacial water source. Now, the Kluane Lake level is dropping rapidly, which will put stress on the environment around the lake and could completely alter the geology of the area. Related: Scientists warn rapidly-melting glacier in West Antarctica could cause serious global havoc Scientists determined that this shift was driven by human-caused climate change after they looked at the Kaskawulsh glacier and calculated that there was only a minuscule chance of it retreating in a stable climate. They also believe that it is unlikely that the Slims River will return to its previous water levels. The researchers published their findings in the journal Nature Geoscience . Via The Washington Post images via Nature Geoscience, Murray Foubister and Nat Wilson

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For the first time, climate change has caused a river to completely reroute

T.Bar: enormous living green walls of lichen and moss line refreshing Panama Fusion restaurant

May 31, 2016 by  
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T.Bar, located in Panama City, took natural food a step further by bringing nature indoors. While the restaurant serves fast, causal food, they place an emphasis on natural, healthy fare. On their Facebook page they say they want guests to feel relaxed and cozy in their space, but they didn’t stop at comfy armchairs or the booth seating lining one wall. Flourishing plants really create an atmosphere of peace. Related: Nation’s largest green wall of native plants breathes life into SFMOMA According to a post written on Archilovers by Dos G Arquitectos founders Ivan Grippaldi and Ginette Gotti, they drew inspiration from the “inner courtyards that are so common in the old quarters of Europe.” Gotti and Grippaldi said they intentionally offered different types of seating for varying hours of the day, from the modern chairs designed for a quick lunch to the booths meant for those who can linger over a meal or cup of tea. According to the architects, T.Bar requested that patrons be able to watch their food being prepared, which they accomplished through ” a glass .” Concrete planters for the trees include tiny tables to allow patrons to get even closer to nature. The designers said this touch adds to the informal feel of the restaurant. Lichen and moss grow on living walls on both sides of the restaurant and in the back near the bathroom. The interior design of the restaurant takes green design literally, bringing the outdoors inside. Via Contemporist Images courtesy of Mosh Benjamin, Pro Pixel Panama

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T.Bar: enormous living green walls of lichen and moss line refreshing Panama Fusion restaurant

Tesla’s Gigafactory to host grand opening on July 29

May 31, 2016 by  
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Ain’t no party like a Tesla party! The California-based luxury car company (turned battery company ) is gearing up for the grand opening of its enormous Gigafactory located outside Reno, Nevada. Tesla announced late last week that the battery factory will open in just two months, with a celebration scheduled for July 29 . Oddly, this grand opening will be a lot different than most others, in that the factory is nowhere near fully operational and construction will continue long after party goers have gone home. Embed from Getty Images Fortune broke the news last week, describing the event as a sort of customer appreciation party. Some Tesla customers learned about the bash via email, when they were informed about winning tickets to the July 29 event—a perk the company extended to previous buyers who referred at least five new Tesla owners. The email doesn’t say much about what will happen at the grand opening party or who else might be in attendance, but it’s probably safe to assume the company’s CEO Elon Musk would join in the revelry. (He’s a pretty fun guy , after all.) Those lucky Tesla owners could be the first members of the public to see inside the giant facility, where Tesla is already manufacturing Powerwall batteries for commercial clients. Related: Take a first look inside Tesla’s Gigafactory It’s difficult to say how much of the factory will have been built prior to party time. Actually, Tesla has already held a number of smaller (also private) events in the areas of the Gigafactory where construction is complete. As of the beginning of May, Bloomberg estimates only 14 percent of the factory had been constructed. There are no updates to suggest how much will be finished by the end of July. The massive $5 billion factory has a footprint spanning 130 acres, making it arguably the largest building in the world . We hope Tesla remembered to invite the folks from the Guinness Book of World Records to the party. Hopefully, they will also invite some members of the press to cover the event, so that nobody has to risk getting arrested just to get a look around. Via CNET Images via QLC Tech Videos (screenshot)

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SaLo House: 20-year off-grid dream home finally lands in Panama

September 17, 2015 by  
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