16 companies rethinking packaging

July 12, 2019 by  
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These consumer goods companies are embracing packaging innovation.

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16 companies rethinking packaging

Sustainably-sourced sunglasses built to last a lifetime rather than a season

June 26, 2019 by  
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Living a sustainable lifestyle is about more than backyard composting and prolific use of Mason jars in lieu of plastic. To truly reach any level of sustainability we need to be aware of every purchase we make including how the product was made and even the packaging used. Although our conscientious purchasing decisions carry weight, corporate responsibility is where the real change will occur — enter Just Human. Just Human feels the burden of that responsibility and has decided to do something about it in the form of long-lasting, quality sunglasses built to last a lifetime, not a season. Related: These sustainable sunglasses smell like coffee and decompose into fertilizer The creation of the sunglasses released earlier this year began with four principals: Focus on the entire system of product creation, from materials to manufacturing to packaging. Streamline the design so that there are only a few products in production, each with a unisex design to serve as many people as possible. Combine function and fashion with a high-performing lens. Focus on durability for a product that won’t end up in the landfill anytime soon. Rather than relying on cheap synthetic materials that have become mainstream in the industry, Just Human sources material for the frames from softwood trees that are sustainably harvested and have earned FSC certification. The glass lenses are made from sand and minerals instead of petroleum-based plastic. Even the cutoffs from lens production are recycled and used for the next round of lens material. Pineapple leaf fibers (we’re hearing a lot about these lately!) and recycled water bottles make up the material for the case that house the sunglasses. The included cleaning cloth is produced using fabric made from 2.5 plastic water bottles . Carrying the eco-friendly idea through to the packaging, Just Human uses 100 percent post-consumer cardboard, eco-friendly inks and compostable tape made from wood pulp. Just Human understands that a focus on sustainability is a mute point if the product doesn’t meet the needs of the consumer so they’ve aimed to combine that focus with function and fashion. Incorporating sports technology into the lens allows them to filter out damaging UVs and glare while providing heat and scratch resistance. In the end, the goal is to provide a luxury product that will endure decades of use without impacting the planet . Wouldn’t it be nice if more companies adopted this simple philosophy? + Just Human Images via Just Human

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Sustainably-sourced sunglasses built to last a lifetime rather than a season

Return to sender: An early Loop customer weighs in

June 20, 2019 by  
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Product selection remains somewhat limited, but TerraCycle’s bold experiment in reusable packaging — aka the milkman model of delivery — gets many things right.

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Return to sender: An early Loop customer weighs in

Energy emissions rise at fastest rate in seven years

June 20, 2019 by  
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BP warns of a ‘growing divergence’ between demands for climate action and pace of emissions cuts, as extreme weather pushes up global fossil fuel use.

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Energy emissions rise at fastest rate in seven years

Episode 172: How new packaging ideas bubble up at Sealed Air, talking green buildings

May 17, 2019 by  
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Plus, why Republican Bob Inglis, a former representative for South Carolina, has made it his mission to educate conservatives about the economics of climate change.

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Episode 172: How new packaging ideas bubble up at Sealed Air, talking green buildings

Earth911 Podcast, March 29, 2019: Sana Packaging Aims for Sustainable Cannabis

March 29, 2019 by  
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The fast-growing cannabis industry is a growing source of packaging … The post Earth911 Podcast, March 29, 2019: Sana Packaging Aims for Sustainable Cannabis appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth911 Podcast, March 29, 2019: Sana Packaging Aims for Sustainable Cannabis

Designer creates algae-sourced alternative for plastic packaging

February 27, 2019 by  
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Food packaging has a become a target in the world of sustainability and environmentalism. Walk down the aisle of any supermarket or look in your own shopping cart, and you’re likely to see package after package made from petroleum-based plastic. A few resourceful scientists and engineers have chosen to tackle the problem, including designer Margarita Talep, who has developed an algae-based alternative to plastic. With the short lifecycle of most packaging, Talep wanted to create a material that would stand up to the task of holding food and other products but break down quickly once it hit the waste stream. Related: Nuatan is the bioplastic that could answer the plastic pollution crisis Agar, a gel-like substance sourced from seaweed, is not new to the food world, as it is commonly used as a food thickener. With that understanding, Talep heats the agar to create a polymer and then adds water as a plasticizer and natural dyes for color. To achieve the goal of all-natural ingredients, natural dyes are sourced from fruits and vegetables such as beets, carrots, blueberries and purple cabbage. After the mixture of agar and other ingredients is heated, it is cooled, a process that transforms it into a gel. At this point, the mixture is turned into thin plastic or poured into molds to cool. By adjusting the ingredients, Talep has created a firm material that will mold into shapes, such as the trays that a package of donuts sit in. The technique is versatile enough that it can also create a replacement for plastic bags, like those pasta is sold in. With the overarching goal of replacing single-use , disposable packaging, the algae packaging breaks down naturally within two to three months during warm summer months, depending on the thickness of the material. In the colder winter months, the material still breaks down, but requires a few extra weeks. + Margarita Talep Images via Margarita Talep

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Designer creates algae-sourced alternative for plastic packaging

Tom Szaky: How to repackage packaging

February 16, 2019 by  
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Making reduce, reuse and recycle reliable.

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Tom Szaky: How to repackage packaging

Some of the largest manufacturers are going green with the milkman model

January 29, 2019 by  
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Loop, introduced at the World Economic Forum last week, is attempting to transform how we purchase and use everyday goods, from shampoo and laundry detergent to orange juice and oatmeal. Some of largest manufacturers are partnering with Loop to ditch  disposable packaging, and replace it with chic and reusable containers that consumers can leave out on the porch to be picked up, washed and refilled, just like the glass milk bottles of years past. “Loop is about the future of consumption. And one of the tenets is that garbage shouldn’t exist,” said Tom Szaky, CEO of TerraCycle, the international recycling company behind Loop. Related: 9 sustainable living tips to take from our grandparents Szaky added that we need to “get at the whole idea of disposability and single-use items” instead of just removing plastics from the ocean, according to NBC Los Angeles . So, Loop is going back to the 1950s “milkman model,” where the company owns the bottle, and customers can have them picked up when they are done using them. Top brands that are partnering with Loop include Nestle, PepsiCo, Procter & Gamble and Unilever. The goal, according to P&G vice president and chief sustainability officer Virginie Helias, is to have all the product packaging be reusable or recyclable by 2030. Products like Pantene shampoo will be delivered in a lightweight aluminum pump container, Tide will be packaged in a stainless steel bottle that has a twist cap and Crest mouthwash will be packaged in a glass bottle. Nestle products like Häagen-Dazs ice cream will be delivered in a stainless steel tub. CEO Laurent Freixe said the company hopes to get rid of its non-recyclable packaging by 2025 and have zero-waste at both the production and consumption levels. In the U.S., Loop will launch in New York , New Jersey and Pennsylvania this spring. The plan is to expand to the West Coast by the end of the year. + Loop Via NBC LA Image via Loop

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Some of the largest manufacturers are going green with the milkman model

Crayola Colorcycle initiative offers free recycling for markers used in K-12 classrooms

January 29, 2019 by  
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In the blur of school activity, students read, write, calculate and doodle. With that vision in mind, no company has created a bigger connection with the educational world than Crayola, monarch of colored pencils, crayons and markers. With that title comes a wave of concern regarding toxins and waste . After all, Crayola manufactures 465 million plastic markers alone each year, which begs the question of corporate responsibility. Fortunately, Crayola’s ahead of the curve on this one with the introduction of a voluntary marker recycling initiative for K-12 classrooms. ColorCycle, the cleverly-named program, came into being a few years ago when Crayola decided to take steps to divert billions of markers “marked” for the landfill . Since the ideology of the company focuses squarely on education, they feel it makes sense to take part in educating students about social and environmental responsibility. “The ColorCycle program has repurposed more than 70 tons of expended markers in the United States and Canada since 2013, and uses the most advanced plastic conversion technologies available today to make wax compounds for asphalt and roofing shingles as well as to generate electricity that can be used to heat homes, cook food, and power vehicles.” In conjunction with teachers, the front line in education, Crayola is backing the environmental movement with the ColorCycle plan that also includes educational-support tools. These lesson plans list supplies and activities that facilitate classroom learning about topics such as coral reefs, inventions, and how pollution travels across the planet. Related: 13 eco-friendly back-to-school supplies for a sustainable school year To participate in ColorCycle, school administrators or PTO members are informed about the program and an ambassador is chosen at the school. Collection boxes are then placed in classrooms or central locations around the school. When it’s time to ship the markers back, they are counted and packed into a plain cardboard box. A quick visit to the Crayola website will provide a shipping label and then FedEx ships the box on Crayola’s dime. To encourage involvement, Crayola also provides a letter that ambassadors can send out to parents and the community, informing them about the program along with signs that can be printed and posted around the school. There are no costs to the school or teachers so the time to set up, monitor, count and package the markers seems like a worthy investment both towards teaching children about eco-friendly practices and in promoting behaviors that help the environment. The Crayola ColorCycle program is currently available to K-12 classrooms across the United States and parts of Canada. Although not currently available outside the public schools, the company encourages daycares and other community members to take advantage of the drop boxes. Crayola will accept all brands of plastic markers, including dry erase markers and highlighters. See the Crayola website for more information about the program and how to sign up. + Crayola Image via ParentRap

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Crayola Colorcycle initiative offers free recycling for markers used in K-12 classrooms

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