Drones are the new cost-effective way to monitor the environment

March 21, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Drones are the new cost-effective way to monitor the environment

Conservationists, researchers and volunteers have spent countless hours on the ground keeping tabs on water quality in rivers across the country. Their work has been instrumental over the years, and new technology in the form of  drones  is making their jobs a whole lot easier. These unmanned aircraft, referred to as drones or UAVs, are easy to control and have become cost-effective in recent years. Environmentalists are using them to monitor ecosystems from the skies and are able to carry out their goals with more efficiency than ever before. Related: Drones — the future of ocean conservation “The technology has come along to the point where everyday people can put a camera up in the air and see beyond the tree line or their property line,” Ben Cunningham, a coordinator working in the field for the Pipeline Compliance Surveillance Initiative, explained. According to Maryland Reporter , Cunningham’s team is keeping an eye on the construction of controversial pipeline projects in Virginia. The drones enable them to see a wider field of view without investing a lot of money or time. The new technology is even superior to what many government officials have in their inventory. Based on numbers from the Federal Aviation Administration, there will be close to seven million drones sold in 2020. That is almost three times the number of unmanned crafts purchased in 2016. These drones range from small quadcopters to more sophisticated airplanes, and many of them are as simple to use as a remote-controlled car . Most drones are also able to take photographs and feature auto-pilot once they are in the air. When it comes to pipeline construction, environmentalists are using drones to take snapshots of the construction progress. They then use the photos to measure how the construction is affecting local environments, including Bay grasses and algal blooms along riversides. Without the drones, these types of large-scale efforts would not be possible without considerable funding and volunteer forces. Because drones are relatively new to the scene, researchers are hoping that they can expand their capabilities and achieve even greater results in the near future. Via Maryland Reporter Image via Paul Henri

The rest is here: 
Drones are the new cost-effective way to monitor the environment

MVRDV-designed market in Taiwan will grow food on a massive green roof

March 21, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on MVRDV-designed market in Taiwan will grow food on a massive green roof

Hot on the heels of its bold “ Times Square” proposal for Taiwan’s capital, MVRDV has broken ground on another project — this time for the island’s southern city of Tainan. Created in collaboration with local architectural firm LLJ Architects, the Tainan Xinhua Fruit and Vegetable Market is a wholesale, open-air market that will not only serve as an important hub for the city’s food supply chain, but will also serve as a new public destination. The landmark building will be topped with an undulating green roof that will be accessible to the public and used for growing crops. Because of its large size, the Tainan Xinhua Fruit and Vegetable Market will be located in a suburban district to the far east of the city center yet strategically placed near Highway 3 and public transportation links for the convenience of traders, buyers and visitors. Spanning an area of nearly 20 acres, the market will include space for auctions, logistics, freezer storage, service facilities, a restaurant, administrative offices and more. “Tainan, in my opinion, is one of those towns which is so beautiful to me because maybe most of its nature, agriculture fields, farms, sea and mountains,” said Winy Maas, co-founder of MVRDV. “Tainan Market can become a building that symbolizes this beauty as it compliments both landscape and its surrounding environment. It is completely functional and caters to the needs for auctioning, selling and buying goods, but its terraced roof with its collection of growing products will allow visitors to take in the landscape while escaping from bustle below.’’ Related: MVRDV to transform an Amsterdam office complex into a green residential zone The first phase of the development will be an open-air structure topped with an undulating, terraced green roof accessible from the eastern corner. The terraces of the roof will each be dedicated to growing a different crop — such as pineapples, rice, roses and tea — and will be furnished with benches and picnic tables for visitors to enjoy the surrounding views. The market is slated for completion in late 2020. + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

See the original post: 
MVRDV-designed market in Taiwan will grow food on a massive green roof

Hen Harriers on the verge of extinction due to gamekeepers killing illegally

March 21, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Hen Harriers on the verge of extinction due to gamekeepers killing illegally

A new study reveals that hen harriers are being killed at an alarming rate on U.K. grouse moors. Scientists found that gamekeepers are eliminating these birds , which are on the verge of extinction in England because they hunt red grouse. Conservationists have been tagging hen harriers in the U.K. for several years and discovered that 72 percent of the birds involved in studies have come up missing. The researchers believe the majority of these birds were killed illegally. Related: Don’t forget to fight for these “less glamorous” endangered species Sadly, 83 percent of juvenile hen harriers in this region do not make it through their first year. In comparison, 65 percent of juveniles do not survive in other areas of the country. In areas completely devoid of grouse moors, those numbers drop to less than 50 percent. According to The Guardian , hen harrier numbers have dropped dangerously low in the U.K., despite the fact that there are acceptable habitats for large numbers to survive with ease. Not only is there plenty of food for the birds of prey, but there are also few predators with which to compete. Even still, only seven of the 58 birds in the study were alive by the end of 2017. Five of the deceased birds uncovered in the study, which spanned a decade, died naturally. Four others sustained injuries consistent with hunting and were considered to be illegally killed. The great majority of the missing birds, however, vanished without a trace. Only a small percentage of these disappearances can be attributed to malfunctioning tags; the rest are believed to be victims of hunting . “Carcasses were rarely recovered, presumably due to suspected illegal killing and carcass disposal,” the study revealed. In order to boost population numbers, a new program was just passed to rear juvenile hen harriers in captivity. Researchers with Natural England plan to find juvenile birds in the wild, raise them in captivity and later release them far from grouse moors. The new hen harrier plan has been met with some resistance by conservationists , though a court just ruled in favor of its legality. Via The Guardian Image via Rob Zweers

Here is the original post: 
Hen Harriers on the verge of extinction due to gamekeepers killing illegally

Planting wildflower strips across crop fields could slash pesticide use

February 2, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Planting wildflower strips across crop fields could slash pesticide use

Could wildflowers help us cut our use of pesticides ? The Guardian reported that colorful strips of the flowers have been planted through 15 large arable fields in England – instead of just around them – as part of a Center for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH) trial. The wildflowers could boost natural pest predators, potentially helping us reduce our reliance on environmentally damaging pesticides. Concern has mounted over how pesticides are harming our environment , even as we struggle to feed all 7.4 billion humans on the planet. Scientists in the UK are seeking sustainable ways to grow food, and wildflowers could help. The flower strips on 15 farms were planted last fall, where researchers will monitor them over the next five years. Related: How one Bay Area couple plans to save the bees by planting one billion wildflowers Stripes of wildflowers across farm fields could cut pesticide spraying https://t.co/L2l1tQJxdm by me @CEHScienceNews pic.twitter.com/kV4KavIjN5 — Damian Carrington (@dpcarrington) January 31, 2018 The Guardian pointed to research showing that use of wildflower margins to boost bugs like hoverflies, ground beetles, and parasitic wasps has cut pest numbers and even increased yields. But in the past, wildflowers were largely planted around fields instead of through them, making it harder for natural predators to get to the middle of large fields. GPS -guided harvesters now allow for crops to be reaped precisely, avoiding wildflower strips. Initial tests revealed planting stripes around 100 meters, or around 328 feet, apart, allowed predators to attack pests like aphids throughout a field. In the field trials, strips are around 20-feet-wide, and take up two percent of the total field area, The Guardian reports. Oxeye daisy, wild carrot, common knapweed, and red clover are among the flowers planted. Scientists will be watching to see if drawing insects into the middle of fields “does more harm than good.” CEH scientist Richard Pywell told The Guardian the ideal is that natural predators keep pests in check over the years so farmers would never have to spray pesticides. The Guardian said similar tests are happening in Switzerland, with flowers like dill, cornflowers, poppy, coriander, and buckwheat. Via The Guardian Images via Henry Be on Unsplash and Wikimedia Commons

Here is the original:
Planting wildflower strips across crop fields could slash pesticide use

General Motors wins cost savings with wind power

December 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on General Motors wins cost savings with wind power

Car manufacturer General Motors (GM) is gone with the wind for all of its cost-saving benefits. “It provides economic certainty to electricity forecasts,” said Rob Threlkeld, GM’s manager of global renewable energy strategy, as well as savings over the years. Threlkeld discusses the path to fulfilling GM’s RE100 commitment to become 100 percent powered by renewable energy, including two deals to source wind power from Ohio and Illinois, respectively. 

The rest is here:
General Motors wins cost savings with wind power

What to Do with Old License Plates

April 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Recycle

Comments Off on What to Do with Old License Plates

I recently came across some old license plates that we’ve accumulated over the years. While license plates can be recycled, ours have lived in a box. Curious about other options for them, I began to look up ideas for what to do with old license…

Read more here:
What to Do with Old License Plates

Why We Should All Live in Earthships

November 2, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Why We Should All Live in Earthships

Over the years, as I’ve become more and more in touch with the ways of green and natural living, I’ve started to become more aware of the things in my home that aren’t quite what they could be. We rent now for a variety of reasons, but one reason…

Read the rest here:
Why We Should All Live in Earthships

How Sweden recycles 99 percent of its waste

August 29, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on How Sweden recycles 99 percent of its waste

Sweden is already an environmental leader with its electric roads and plans to be 100% fossil fuel-free by 2050, but they’re not stopping there. The trailblazing Scandinavian nation also recycles 99 percent of its waste , with only a measly 1 percent going to landfills. A process called waste-to-energy generates sustainable electricity from the country’s garbage. Of the Sweden’s 4.4 million tons of household waste produced annually, 2.2 million tons are converted into energy using waste-to-energy (WTE), according to Global Citizen . Garbage that is sorted for WTE plants is burned to produce steam, which is then used to spin turbines and generate electricity. Sweden is so proficient at its waste management practices that it actually imports 800,000 tons of rubbish from nearby countries to its 32 WTE plants. Related: Sweden plans to import 800,000 tons of garbage each year The system depends on residents responsibly in handling their trash, which has become more commonplace over the years. Citizens sort their garbage to go to recycling facilities or WTE plants, resulting in the impressive 99 percent recycled waste statistic nationwide. If the country keeps it up, they could achieve the label of zero waste by the year 2020. Meanwhile, the U.S. sends 55 percent of its waste to landfills each year. Via Global Citizen Images via Pixabay ( 1 , 2 )

Original post: 
How Sweden recycles 99 percent of its waste

Building green and building profits

November 7, 2015 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Building green and building profits

The U.S. Green Building Council has shown, over the years, that seeking profit and seeking sustainability can be one and the same thing.

More here:
Building green and building profits

6 Awesome Ways To Upcycle Old Books

July 21, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on 6 Awesome Ways To Upcycle Old Books

Whether you are a book nerd or just seem to have collected stacks of novels over the years, it can be difficult to know what to do with all those books. Sure, there are many different ways you can display your favorite pieces of literature…

The rest is here:
6 Awesome Ways To Upcycle Old Books

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1406 access attempts in the last 7 days.