Electric bus fleets are the latest tool for improving air quality

October 8, 2019 by  
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And both North America and Europe are primed for market growth over the next decade.

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Electric bus fleets are the latest tool for improving air quality

Cargill pledges to tackle climate impact of beef business

July 31, 2019 by  
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Regenerative agriculture is central to new plan to slash greenhouse gas emissions by one-third over the next decade.

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Cargill pledges to tackle climate impact of beef business

Tips for making CO2 a KPI for freight transportation

July 16, 2019 by  
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Driven by increasing volumes of goods moving through supply chains across the globe, demand for freight transportation is expected to triple over the next few years. If we continue shipping goods as we do today, freight emissions will surpass energy as the most carbon-intensive sector by 2050, doubling carbon emissions by 2050.

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Tips for making CO2 a KPI for freight transportation

Shareable scooters may seem sustainable, but are they really?

July 16, 2019 by  
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Zipping around town on tiny two-wheelers seems like the green thing to do — but there’s more to sustainability than saving energy.

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Shareable scooters may seem sustainable, but are they really?

Airplanes’ contrail clouds are more harmful than their carbon emissions

July 1, 2019 by  
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The streaky clouds behind airplanes are the center of a new study that looks at these clouds’ contribution to climate change . As airplanes reach higher altitudes they release not only exhaust but also water vapor that forms clouds known as contrails. While most contrails dissipate quickly, others remain for hours and warm the atmosphere. The German Aerospace Center used widely accepted climate models to predict how the impact of contrails will change over the next few decades. According to its models, the global warming effect of contrails alone could triple by 2050 . This rate of growth is higher than that of exhaust emissions, thanks to current and future innovations in fuel-efficient technology. In fact, the greenhouse gas effect of contrails is higher than the total impact of carbon emissions from airplane exhaust. Related: Time-saving supersonic airplanes could be a disaster for the environment The airline industry is expected to quadruple over the next few decades and newer planes tend to fly higher than their predecessors. This means that contrails are likely to remain in the atmosphere longer, especially over tropical areas, where the conditions extend the life of the clouds. Although low-hanging clouds tend to cool down the Earth’s temperatures, those higher up actually absorb thermal radiation emitted from the Earth and then warm the atmosphere. What start as thin, long clouds can spread across thousands of square miles in certain conditions. In relation to other emissions , the streaky clouds have a small and possibly insignificant contribution to climate change. “While the contrail forcing is certainly significant, it’s a relatively small contributor to overall warming,” an atmospheric scientist from Dartmouth College told Earther . However, because the climate crisis has reached the point of all-hands-on-deck, every identified source of emissions is a target for reduction via innovation and advanced technology . Via Earther Image via Pexels

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Airplanes’ contrail clouds are more harmful than their carbon emissions

A tale of two cities, 2030 edition

May 6, 2019 by  
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A great migration forces an existential question for the modern metropolis: how might entrepreneurs upgrade urban living over the next 10 years?

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A tale of two cities, 2030 edition

Turns out creating circular food systems is not as easy as pie

May 6, 2019 by  
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Key takeaways from our May 1 webcast about the state-of-the-market in circularity.

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Turns out creating circular food systems is not as easy as pie

New York City passes landmark bill to cut carbon emissions of big buildings by 80%

April 22, 2019 by  
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New York City just passed a landmark bill to cut carbon emissions. City council members overwhelming voted in favor of a historic law, called the The Climate Mobilization Act, which will reduce emissions of buildings larger than 25,000 square feet by 80 percent over the next 30 years. The most significant portion of the bill will require these buildings to reduce carbon emissions by 40 percent over the next decade. By 2050, these buildings will have to cut emissions by 80 percent total, greatly reducing overall air pollution in the Big Apple. Buildings of this size, including Trump Tower, represent a tiny portion of the city but cause about half of building-related pollution. Related: New York vows to ban plastic bags statewide in 2020 The new law comes on the heels of a study from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that linked building emissions to climate change. Researchers with the IPCC concluded that carbon emissions in the United States grew by a little over 3 percent in 2018. Large buildings were a major contributor to the jump in emissions, and the study called for tighter restrictions in the building sector. New York City’s new initiative will undoubtedly help lower those numbers. The plan will also create jobs for thousands of New Yorkers. Lawmakers estimate that the law will put around 20,000 people to work, mainly in the construction industry. With the bill being beneficial to the environment and economy, city council members voted it in 45-2. “The Climate Mobilization Act is a down payment on the future of New York City — one that ensures we lead the way in the ever-growing fight against climate change ,” Costa Constantinides, a member of the city council, shared. Constantinides added that he hopes the new law will encourage other cities to enact similar legislation. Apart from curbing building emissions, the bill includes measures to boost energy efficiency in utility plants, encourage green roofs and various forms of renewable energy  and make it easier for individuals to receive wind project permits. Despite the positive outlook on cutting carbon emissions, the bill was met with considerable resistance on behalf of several real estate firms in the city. Via Climate Nexus Image via Bruce Emmerling

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New York City passes landmark bill to cut carbon emissions of big buildings by 80%

Finland plans to complete its coal ban one year early

March 12, 2019 by  
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Finland is following through with its coal ban initiative and making it a top priority over the next 10 years. The country promised to eliminate its reliance on coal by 2030, and Finnish Parliament just pushed through a motion to complete the ban a year earlier than the previous goal. One year may not seem like much, but moving the ban up means  Finland  will be completely coal-free in the next decade. The move also means that the country will have to increase its phasing out program by around 10 percent to meet the new goal. This might seem like a lot of pressure, but other companies have successfully switched to renewable energy faster than expected. Related: Renewable energy could overtake fossil fuels in Britain by next year According to TreeHugger , LEGO reached its goal of 100 percent renewable energy three years before its deadline, while Norway reduced its carbon dioxide emissions three years ahead of schedule. Sweden also changed to renewables about 12 years before the original goal, and both India and China have met their eco-friendly goals ahead of time. Coal currently comprises about 8 percent of Finland’s annual consumption. Even still, the country will have to move quickly if it wants to eliminate coal entirely. This includes pursuing long-term programs that will provide clean energy to residents while being cost-effective for businesses. Fortunately, Finland has already invested in these types of programs, and lawmakers are confident that the country will reach the newly proposed deadline. Finland’s coal ban initiative is a clear indication that the world is decreasing its reliance on non-renewable energy sources. Hopefully, other countries will follow Finland’s lead and move forward with their own coal-free programs in the near future. Many countries have voted in coal bans similar to Finland’s, but with climate change already having an impact around the world, the faster we implement coal bans, the better. Via TreeHugger and CleanTechnica Image via Ninara

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Finland plans to complete its coal ban one year early

These sustainable tiny cabins offer a serene escape in nature just 2 hours from NYC

March 12, 2019 by  
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For anyone looking to find some serenity surrounded by incredible nature, Gather Greene is waiting for you. Located just two hours outside of NYC in beautiful Hudson Valley, Gather Greene is a glamping retreat featuring 17 minimalist cabins. Designed by Lushna , the tiny cabins with gabled roofs and large glazed “picture walls” were designed to let guests immerse themselves in the idyllic surroundings. The distinctive wooden eco-cabins are part of Lushna’s Petite Reflect collection. Located deep in a serene forestscape, the triangular tiny cabins are spaced far apart to provide ultimate privacy. To make the most out of the nature-based escape, the glamping structures feature a gabled roof with a large front wall that is entirely glazed from top to bottom. The glass wall behind the bed was a strategic part of the design, enabling guests to enjoy their natural surroundings from the moment they wake up until they shut their eyes at night. Additionally, a mirror is mounted on the foot end of the bed, so that guests don’t have to strain their necks to enjoy the amazing views. Related: Gorgeous “glamping” eco-cabins help you reconnect with nature in luxury Although quite compact, the glamping cabins are equipped with all of the basic amenities to create a luxurious stay in nature. The cabins feature a space-saving interior design that provides maximum functionality with minimal space. For example, the interior includes a “smart box concept” that features a dinette, kitchenette and closet, all of which can be concealed into the walls. The tiny cabins , which sleep up to two guests, have fully-equipped bathrooms with stand-up showers. To completely immerse yourself into the location, the structures also have open-air decks that offer the perfect spot for dining al fresco or stargazing at night. + Lushna Via DesignMilk Photography by Kelsey Ann Rose via Lushna Glamping

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These sustainable tiny cabins offer a serene escape in nature just 2 hours from NYC

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