Resurrected greenhouse to honor father of modern genetics

April 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Resurrected greenhouse to honor father of modern genetics

International architecture and urban design practice  CHYBIK + KRISTOF has unveiled designs for an energy-efficient greenhouse to commemorate Gregor Mendel, a scientist and Augustinian friar regarded as the founder of the modern science of genetics. Set on the foundations of the 19th-century Brno greenhouse where Mendel conducted his pioneering experiments, the new greenhouse will pay homage to the original architecture and Mendel’s teachings. The greenhouse is slated for completion in 2022 to commemorate Mendel’s birth 200 years ago.  Born in 1822, Gregor Mendel spent eight seasons, from 1856 to 1863, cultivating and breeding pea plants in a 19th-century greenhouse that had been built in the St. Thomas Augustinian Abbey’s gardens to cement the monastery as a leading center for scientific research. In 1870, however, a storm destroyed the building, leaving only its foundations intact today. The experiments that Mendel had conducted within the greenhouse are now widely recognized as the foundation of modern genetics .  CHYBIK + KRISTOF’s resurrection of the historic greenhouse begins with the preservation of the foundations that will be integrated into the new structure and left visible. The foundations will inform the orientation and shape of the greenhouse, which will be reminiscent of the original building. “While the trapezoidal volume is identical to the original edifice, the reimagined supporting steel structure seeks inspiration from Mendel’s three laws of inheritance – and the drawings of his resulting heredity system,” explained the architects. “Likewise, the pitched roof, consisting of a vast outer glass surface, reflects his law of segregation and the distribution of inherited traits, and is complemented by a set of modular shades.” Related: Kuehn Malvezzi tops a brick office building in Germany with an energy-efficient greenhouse In addition to celebrating Mendel’s work, the revived structure will primarily be used as a flexible events space that can adapt to a variety of functions, from conferences and lectures to temporary exhibitions. The flexible design will also be entirely exposed to the outdoors. For energy efficiency, the architects have integrated a concealed system of underground heat pumps  into the greenhouse, as well as adjustable shades and embedded blinds to facilitate natural cooling and ventilation.  + CHYBIK + KRISTOF Images by monolot and CHYBIK + KRISTOF

Read more: 
Resurrected greenhouse to honor father of modern genetics

Resurrected greenhouse to honor father of modern genetics

April 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Resurrected greenhouse to honor father of modern genetics

International architecture and urban design practice  CHYBIK + KRISTOF has unveiled designs for an energy-efficient greenhouse to commemorate Gregor Mendel, a scientist and Augustinian friar regarded as the founder of the modern science of genetics. Set on the foundations of the 19th-century Brno greenhouse where Mendel conducted his pioneering experiments, the new greenhouse will pay homage to the original architecture and Mendel’s teachings. The greenhouse is slated for completion in 2022 to commemorate Mendel’s birth 200 years ago.  Born in 1822, Gregor Mendel spent eight seasons, from 1856 to 1863, cultivating and breeding pea plants in a 19th-century greenhouse that had been built in the St. Thomas Augustinian Abbey’s gardens to cement the monastery as a leading center for scientific research. In 1870, however, a storm destroyed the building, leaving only its foundations intact today. The experiments that Mendel had conducted within the greenhouse are now widely recognized as the foundation of modern genetics .  CHYBIK + KRISTOF’s resurrection of the historic greenhouse begins with the preservation of the foundations that will be integrated into the new structure and left visible. The foundations will inform the orientation and shape of the greenhouse, which will be reminiscent of the original building. “While the trapezoidal volume is identical to the original edifice, the reimagined supporting steel structure seeks inspiration from Mendel’s three laws of inheritance – and the drawings of his resulting heredity system,” explained the architects. “Likewise, the pitched roof, consisting of a vast outer glass surface, reflects his law of segregation and the distribution of inherited traits, and is complemented by a set of modular shades.” Related: Kuehn Malvezzi tops a brick office building in Germany with an energy-efficient greenhouse In addition to celebrating Mendel’s work, the revived structure will primarily be used as a flexible events space that can adapt to a variety of functions, from conferences and lectures to temporary exhibitions. The flexible design will also be entirely exposed to the outdoors. For energy efficiency, the architects have integrated a concealed system of underground heat pumps  into the greenhouse, as well as adjustable shades and embedded blinds to facilitate natural cooling and ventilation.  + CHYBIK + KRISTOF Images by monolot and CHYBIK + KRISTOF

More here: 
Resurrected greenhouse to honor father of modern genetics

The power of social enterprise: Can a forgotten nut boost Nigeria’s economy?

October 15, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on The power of social enterprise: Can a forgotten nut boost Nigeria’s economy?

An innovative start-up is leveraging the original ingredient in Coca-Cola to kickstart sustainable development in the country.

See the rest here:
The power of social enterprise: Can a forgotten nut boost Nigeria’s economy?

The power of social enterprise: Can a forgotten nut boost Nigeria’s economy?

October 15, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on The power of social enterprise: Can a forgotten nut boost Nigeria’s economy?

An innovative start-up is leveraging the original ingredient in Coca-Cola to kickstart sustainable development in the country.

The rest is here:
The power of social enterprise: Can a forgotten nut boost Nigeria’s economy?

Scientific consensus reaches beyond 99% on human-caused climate change

July 25, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Scientific consensus reaches beyond 99% on human-caused climate change

Researchers have released three additional studies confirming the consensus among scientists that climate change is real. More than 99 percent of scientists have reached the same conclusion that global warming is real and caused by human activity, with findings showing that current warming is unprecedented when compared to the last 2,000 years. Even though most deniers are political or corporate-backed — rather than driven by science — scientists continue to release worrisome research repeating and reconfirming that all evidence indicates climate change is real in hopes that the consensus itself will be convincing. Related: Climate anxiety — is hopelessness preventing us from confronting our biggest challenge? “There is no doubt left — as has been shown extensively in many other studies addressing many different aspects of the climate system using different methods and data sets,” said Stefan Brönnimann of the University of Bern. The three studies were published in Nature and Nature Geoscience and indicate that the temperature spikes over the last few decades have not been as dramatic over the last 2,000 years . While there have been other roving and site-specific temperature changes, such as the Little Ice Age , the current record-breaking temperatures impact the entire globe. The researchers used proxy indicators such as evidence in trees , ice and sediment, which show that changes in climate have never been as severe as they are now. “The good news is public understanding of the scientific consensus is increasing,” said researcher James Cook, who wrote the original paper on scientific consensus in 2013. “The bad news is there is still a lot of work to do yet as climate deniers continue to persistently attack the scientific consensus.” Last week, the original paper was downloaded for the one millionth time, making it the most-read study by the Institute of Physics. Cook also wrote a follow-up to this study, but because of the recent rise in disasters and interest in climate change , he plans to revise his paper again. Via The Guardian Image via Christopher Michel

Go here to read the rest:
Scientific consensus reaches beyond 99% on human-caused climate change

A Seattle midcentury home is restored to its original brilliance with a modern twist

September 3, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A Seattle midcentury home is restored to its original brilliance with a modern twist

When a young family reached out to Seattle-based design studio SHED Architecture & Design and interior designer Jennie Gruss for a redesign of their 1957 midcentury home in the city, the designers responded with a restoration that also integrated new, modern details. Named the Hillside Midcentury, the home saw an interior remodel that leaned heavily on a mix of natural timber and brick to create a homey atmosphere. Contemporary furnishings, clean lines and an abundance of glazing help give the home a fresh and youthful spirit. Originally designed by Pacific Northwest architect Arnold Gangnes, the existing home had a fairly open layout with an airy feel that embraced the outdoors and featured two floors with mirrored floor plans, a common architectural design in the 1950s. “[We] did not make any major structural changes but instead updated the kitchen, bathrooms and bedrooms to better align with the family’s living patterns,” the team said. Outside, the firm also added a large deck, updated patio and green roof. Timber wraps the interior with the original hardwood preserved in the living room and dining room. To break up the wood motif in the kitchen, the architects inserted maroon laminate cabinets from Beech Tree Woodworks for a splash of color. The exposed ceiling beams and datum are painted black to give a strong sense of structure to the house. Related: Old horse stable transformed into a chic art studio and guesthouse In addition to the updated materials and furnishings, some of the most notable changes can be seen in the updated floor layouts. On the basement level, the spacious living room was split up into a guest bedroom, mudroom and media room. Upstairs, one of the original bedrooms was converted into a large master bath, while the existing bathrooms were modified into a walk-in closet. Perhaps most impressively, the architects turned an old tool shed into an indoor swimming pool topped with a green roof . + SHED Architecture & Design Images via Rafael Soldi, exterior via SHED

See the original post: 
A Seattle midcentury home is restored to its original brilliance with a modern twist

Century-old Japanese townhouse reborn as Blue Bottle Coffees first Kyoto location

June 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Century-old Japanese townhouse reborn as Blue Bottle Coffees first Kyoto location

Japanese architecture firm Schemata Architects has unveiled Blue Bottle Coffee’s first outpost in Kyoto  – and it’s housed in a century-old building. Following the aesthetic of the previous Schemata-designed Blue Bottle cafes in Tokyo, the newest location features a minimalist and modern design that takes inspiration from the surrounding urban fabric. The two-story structure was carefully overhauled to allow for new functionality while preserving and exposing historic elements. Completed in March this year, the Blue Bottle Coffee Kyoto Cafe is located near the base of Kyoto’s forested Higashiyama mountains and along the approach to Nanzen-ji Temple, a Zen Buddhist temple and one of the historic city’s top tourist attractions. The cafe was built inside a traditional Japanese townhouse (known as ‘machiya’) consisting of two separate buildings. Schemata Architects renovated the buildings into a ‘Merchandise building’ and a ‘Cafe building’ with a total floor area of nearly 3,500 square feet. As was typical of traditional Japanese architecture at the turn of the 20th century, the original floors of the machiya were raised nearly 20 inches off the ground. To create a seamless appearance and to accommodate patrons with special mobility needs, the Blue Bottle Cafe’s architects demolished the raised wooden floors and made them level with the ground. The new floors feature terrazzo containing the same type of pebbles used outside. The same terrazzo material was also used in the counters and benches. Related: Tokyo capsule hotel gets a Finnish-inspired refresh and sauna “The floor inside the counter is also level with the customer area to maintain the same eye level between customers and staff following the same concept as the other shops, while integrating Japanese and American cultures at the same time,” said the architects. “The continuous white floor is stripped of all unnecessary things and the structure is stripped of existing finishes to expose the original roof structure and clay walls, and one can see traces of its 100-year old history throughout the large, medium and small spaces in the structure originally composed of two separate buildings.” The second floor has been converted into an open-plan office with glass frontage. + Schemata Architects Images by Takumi Ota

Read the original post:
Century-old Japanese townhouse reborn as Blue Bottle Coffees first Kyoto location

A 1940s home gets a modern update with reclaimed materials

May 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on A 1940s home gets a modern update with reclaimed materials

Australian studio Porter Architects has sensitively restored and updated a 1940s dwelling in Lake Wendouree, Australia into a modern and light-filled family home. Large windows, contemporary furnishings and finishes breathe new life into the Ballarat property, but the clients and architects were also careful to preserve the home’s original historic elements as well. As a result, recycled and reclaimed materials were used throughout the renovation. Renovations can often be stressful affairs, especially when it comes to older properties like the Lake Wendouree House. Fortunately, however, clients Tom and Meeghan McInerney bought a home that had been extremely well looked after. Its previous owners were two sisters who had lived there for 60 years and kept detailed records for maintenance. Careful upkeep also meant that the original timber paneling and decorative plasterwork were kept in pristine condition. However, the home felt too dark for the couple, who wanted a home that not only was filled with natural light , but would also embrace the outdoors. To preserve the existing architecture as much as possible, Porter Architects created a contemporary extension that opens up to the north-facing backyard and timber patio through large windows and a folding operable glass wall. The Lake Wendouree House’s original front, which they kept intact, contains bedrooms, bathrooms and a study, while the new addition serves as the heart of the home with an open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room. Unsurprisingly, the client’s favorite room is the light-filled kitchen that features a marble backsplash and counters. Related: Mid-century Dutch farmhouse gets a bold contemporary makeover To match the existing hardwood floors found in the original structure, the architects installed recycled floorboards in the rear extension. To give the traditional brick exterior a modern refresh, the architects added timber paneling and added reclaimed 1940s bricks in a contemporary pattern. The extension’s minimalist interior features whitewashed walls, timber paneling and furniture, and contemporary furnishings and fittings. + Porter Architects Images by Derek Swalwell

Read the original:
A 1940s home gets a modern update with reclaimed materials

The United States’ first Passive Plus House generates nearly all the energy it needs

April 23, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The United States’ first Passive Plus House generates nearly all the energy it needs

This beautiful brownstone in Brooklyn  has been refurbished into the first Passive Plus House in the United States. Located in Carroll Gardens, 78 Third Place features an impressive array of cutting-edge renewable technologies wrapped in a thoughtful renovation that preserves the original home’s historic character. The house, remodeled by Baxt Ingui Architects , saves 80 to 90 percent of the energy needed to heat and cool the building and nearly reaches net-zero energy consumption. The Brooklyn townhouse was originally built in the early 1900s. Baxt Ingui Architects expanded the building to include a new third floor with a mansard and a modern rear addition that nearly doubles the brownstone’s original footprint. “The homeowners’ goal was to create a beautiful, open and inviting home suitable for everyday living and entertaining as well as respecting the historic character of the original house while incorporating high-performance construction,” the architects wrote. “They emphasized the need for abundant natural light throughout the home as well as an open flow when designing indoor/outdoor living spaces.” Related: Park Slope row home renovation marries historic charm with energy-conserving features The architects collaborated with a team of six contractors, three engineers, Passive House consultants and eco-conscious clients to make the upgrades. Baxt Ingui Architects installed low E and argon-filled triple-glazed windows, cellulose insulation and a 387-square-foot Brooklyn Solarworks solar canopy to help offset the home’s energy needs. The well-sealed townhouse is also equipped with a very quiet Energy Recovery Ventilation system, an air-to-air heat pump and an improved gas-condensing boiler. + Baxt Ingui Architects Via ArchDaily Images © John Muggenborg Photography

More here: 
The United States’ first Passive Plus House generates nearly all the energy it needs

Gogoro launches Smartscooter 2 with better handling, brighter headlights, and extra storage

May 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Gogoro launches Smartscooter 2 with better handling, brighter headlights, and extra storage

Groundbreaking transportation company Gogoro is at it again. Today, they are expanding their innovative scooter family with the Gogoro 2 Smartscooter. The new scooter will appeal to even more people, thanks to better ergonomics, more storage and seating space and customizability options. If you haven’t heard of Gogoro , the Taiwan-based company is kind of like the Tesla of two-wheeled transportation, with smart electric scooters, home batteries and a battery-swapping infrastructure that is changing the face of urban transportation. The Gogoro 2 has all the features that makes the original Smartscooter great, but it adds more comfort, safety and control. It features a 6.4 kilowatt G2 motor with a high-performance electric powertrain with both Smart and Sport modes, so you can choose between range or speed. Related: Paris launches electric scooter sharing program with Coup and Gogoro The Smartscooter 2 introduces more seating and storage, so it is more comfortable and convenient to ride. It also has better handling, a new Synchronized Braking System and is just as easy to maintain as the original. The LED lighting also gets an upgrade, along with a new color dashboard with a full LED display. You can also mount your device to the new dashboard for real-time riding info. And if you want to make your scooter all your own, you can choose from 6 exterior colors, 50+ accessories, and dynamically tune dashboard colors, sound themes and lighting patterns. And, of course, you get access to the Gogoro Energy Network. Pricing starts at $1,295 in Taiwan after government subsidies, and the scooter comes in two models – The Gogoro 2 and the Gogoro 2 Plus – so you can choose how much you want to spend. + Gogoro

See more here:
Gogoro launches Smartscooter 2 with better handling, brighter headlights, and extra storage

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 13303 access attempts in the last 7 days.