Origami-inspired clothing line that grows with kids wins Dyson award

September 7, 2017 by  
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The cost of keeping a growing child clothed is oftentimes staggering, which is why this expanding origami-inspired range of children’s clothing was awarded this year’s UK  James Dyson award . Ryan Yasin, frustrated by the waste in the children’s clothing industry, used scientific principles he studied for his degree in aeronautical engineering to produce incredible clothing that grows with the child who wears it. The origami-inspired line is called Petit Pli, and the London-based postgraduate describes it as “the most advanced kids’ clothing in the world.” The clothing is made from distinctive pleated lightweight fabric which is machine washable, waterproof and recyclable . One article of clothing will fit a three-month-old until he or she is three years old. According to a recent survey by Aviva , parents spend an average £2,000 on clothing before their child reaches the age of three. This is because most children grow seven sizes in their first two years of life. Not only does mass production of garments put huge pressure on the environment through waste, water consumption, and carbon emissions , it takes a toll on parents’ wallets. The Guardian reports that the trousers and tops Yasin designed mimic version of sought-after clothing by legendary Japans designer Issey Miyake . However, Yasin’s version can be worn for years and are incredibly durable. The Petit Pli clothing line employs the negative Poisson’s ratio, which Yasin studied at London’s Imperial College. Materials that have this ratio (known as auxetics) become thicker and can expand in two directions at the same time.So far, the designer has created more than 500 prototypes for Petit Pli and intends to use his £2,000 ($2,615.63 USD) prize money from the Dyson award to partner with investors and expand the business. Reportedly, he is in talks with major retailers in the UK and hopes to sell the clothing in stores within a few months. Related: James Dyson Wants to Use His Famous Vacuum Technology to Clean Rivers Said Yasin, “It’s just great to have that backing and recognition of my solution. The prize money is an added bonus, but I know how I will use it. In addition to supporting my R&D, it will help me form an interdisciplinary team of experts to take Petit Pli to the next level: putting it in the hands of parents worldwide and making a tangible difference to the way we consume resources in the fashion industry .” The designer will keep the garments at an affordable price while ensuring everyone along the supply chain is paid ethically . The Petit Pli line will now be entered into the international competition of the James Dyson Award. Winners will be announced in October, and the top invention will receive £30,000 ($39,225.00 USD) in prize money. + Petit Pli Via The Guardian Images via Petit Pli 

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Origami-inspired clothing line that grows with kids wins Dyson award

Colorful hut made of 2,500 LEGO-like bricks invites visitors to return to their childhood

September 7, 2017 by  
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Montpellier’s summer  Festival des Architectures Vives is a fun annual event that sees various architectural installations from emerging designers tucked into various courtyards around the city. This year’s exhibitions are all unique, but one funky hut made of 2,500 plastic bricks brings some vibrant color to the event. Created by Atelier Micromega , La Madeleine is a large cube structure that invites adults and kids alike to explore its LEGO-inspired fun. The yearly event is aimed at fostering the relationship between historic urban environments and contemporary architecture . Every year, various teams of young architects and designers install their unique installations in the city’s many courtyards. The 2017 edition is showcasing ten emerging design firms whose work was designed to reflect this year’s theme of “emotion.” Related: These LEGO-like recycled plastic bricks create sturdy homes for just $5,200 Atelier Micromega, whose team includes five young architects, installed La Madeleine in hopes of bringing visitors back to their childhood. Thousands of colorful plastic bricks were used to create the hut, complete with an open-air skylight in the ceiling. Some of the bricks on the interior are interchangeable so visitors can modify the bricks to change the hut’s interior during their visit. According to the team, their design was inspired by nostalgia, “The installation rests on architecture, space and matter to play with our nostalgia. It invites the visitor to be moved by traveling through it, interacting with it, echoing his childhood memories. The smooth, perfect cube refers to adulthood. The world that it contains: evolutionary, creative and malleable appeals to the child, making the space of the cave his cabin.” After the event, all of the plastic bricks will be donated to several child-care facilities around Montpellier as well as the national charity organization, Les Restos du Coeur . + Atelier Microméga Via v2com Photography via Paul Kozlowski  

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Colorful hut made of 2,500 LEGO-like bricks invites visitors to return to their childhood

Sound-absorbing materials fold into a giant origami-like meeting pod

August 30, 2017 by  
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Open-plan offices are great in theory, but their noisy nature can make holding meetings a pain. Leanne Zilka of Zilka Studio has come up with a pop-up solution in the form of PleatPod, an origami-like meeting pavilion made with sound-absorbing materials. The eye-catching meeting space was commissioned by RMIT University and created in collaboration with textile designer Jenny Underwood. The portable pop-up meeting pod stretches out like an accordion into its desired cylindrical shape and can also be compressed and put aside to save space. Bright red and orange sound-absorbing materials clad the angular pavilion’s exterior and provide a sharp contrast to the gray-toned interior. PleatPod was constructed using digital fabrication method and crafted to look like a giant asymmetric piece of origami. Related: Macquarie Bank’s Green Office is Part Space Station, Part Cathedral “The PleatPod is the result of investigation into fashion and textile techniques to produce an enclosure that sits between architecture and a garment,” says a statement on Zilka Studio’s website. “By studying the Pleat (defined as a type of fold formed by doubling fabric back upon itself and securing it in place, commonly used in clothing and upholstery to gather a wide piece of fabric around a circumference), we were able to merge skin, structure and form removing hierarchies between them. New fabrication and modeling technologies allowed for the translation of a garment scaled concept to become a realised space.” + Zilka Studio Via domus Images via Zilka Studio

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Sound-absorbing materials fold into a giant origami-like meeting pod

Larger-than-life pineapple origami structure pops up on a historic UK landscape

July 18, 2017 by  
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If you love pineapples, prepare to pine over this gorgeous sculpture that’s popped up at the National Trust’s historic Berrington Hall in Herefordshire. Heather and Ivan Morison of Studio Morison designed Look! Look! Look!, a stunning sculptural pavilion in the shape of pineapple origami. The temporary installation is both beautiful and functional, and also draws attention to iconic landscape designer Capability Brown’s final masterpiece, the walled garden at the Georgian mansion. The Look! Look! Look! pavilion was developed as part of the National Trust and Arts Council England’s Trust New Art , a program of projects that brings new art to unique and historic settings. The dusty pink pineapple pavilion is instantly eye-catching and takes inspiration from Berrington’s Georgian history, particularly the use of exotic fruit like pineapples that were thought to have once been grown at the garden as a symbol of the family’s wealth and contemporariness. The pavilion’s delicate folds echo the geometric shapes found in the mansion’s interior. Studio Morison used paper origami to craft the pineapple structure and then worked with structural engineers Artura to bring the designs to life. Set on a sunken metal foundation frame, the 100-square-meter pavilion is made of CNC-milled timber pieces constructed into an intricate jigsaw totaling 90 frames. A special weather-resistant woven fabric, supplied by Mermet, is overlaid atop the timber structure. The interior features a weather-resistant wooden cobbled floor. Related: Luxembourg bar renovation mimics Japanese origami for a low footprint “The final piece looks strong and sculptural from far away, but takes on a translucent appearance from inside,” reads the press release. “The artists have also created bespoke, sculptural furniture housed inside the pavilion which echoes the geometric form of the structure.” Look! Look! Look! is open to the public until December 2019 and hosts a series of programs such as music and yoga. + Studio Morison Images via Ivan Morison

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Thousands of paper bats swoop down on Latvias Nature Concert Hall

August 3, 2016 by  
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In contrast to last year’s Nature Concert Hall that comprised an angular pavilion, the 2016 iteration was created as a “levitating cloud” that hovers above a bandstand. The black origami bats were inspired by the common long-eared bat (Plecotus Auritus) that can be found living in Latvia year-round but are facing downward trends in population numbers due to human-induced changes. Related: Latvia’s Nature Concert Hall has a fabric skin that plays with the wind In a bid to raise awareness and appreciation of the bats, the designers created a giant cloud-like mass made from black pieces of paper folded into bat-like shapes. The bats are suspended in a giant net and carefully spaced to create an interesting gradient. The mass is opaque enough to double as a screen for video projections and light installations . “The volume of the cloud is referring to flocking bird and bat created dynamic geometries that can be found in nature,” write DJA. “To achieve maximum lightness and levitation effect art installation is suspended in 3 paired electricity columns far away each from another.” + Didzis Jaunzems Architecture + Nature Concert Hall Images by Uldis Lapins

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Thousands of paper bats swoop down on Latvias Nature Concert Hall

Paper Dandy’s Horrorgami Papercuts Honor Cult Classic Horror Films

October 26, 2015 by  
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Nguy?n Hùng C??ng Creates Strikingly Realistic Origami Animals

December 14, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Nguy?n Hùng C??ng Creates Strikingly Realistic Origami Animals Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green design , Nguy?n Hùng C??ng , origami , paper art , sustainable design , Vietnamese paper

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Nguy?n Hùng C??ng Creates Strikingly Realistic Origami Animals

Colorful Intricate Insects Made from Recycled Prints and Magazines

September 24, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Colorful Intricate Insects Made from Recycled Prints and Magazines Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green design , IGEPA Benelux paper , origami , Paper Craft , recycled paper , Soon Agency , sustainable design

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Artist Cheong-ah Hwang Transforms Recycled Paper into Intricate Works of Art

July 10, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Artist Cheong-ah Hwang Transforms Recycled Paper into Intricate Works of Art Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , artwork , cheong-ah hwang , cuts , hand-crafted paper art , illustrations , intricate miniature art , maticulous paper art , meticulous paper art , origami , Paper , paper art , Paper Craft , paper sculpture , paper toys , recycled art , recycled paper , scissors , sculpture , self-taught paper artist , upcycled art , upcycled paper

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Artist Cheong-ah Hwang Transforms Recycled Paper into Intricate Works of Art

TSC Architects’ Home for Two is Wrapped in a Folded Origami Roof

April 23, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of TSC Architects’ Home for Two is Wrapped in a Folded Origami Roof Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: daylit home Japan , folded roof , Japanese architects , mountain architecture , natural ventilation , origami architecture , origami house , Origami House TSC Architects , Sustainable buildings , traditional architecture Japan , triangular roofs , TSC Architects house , vernacular architecture Japan

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TSC Architects’ Home for Two is Wrapped in a Folded Origami Roof

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