Soil carbon is a valuable resource but not all soil carbon is created equal

February 25, 2020 by  
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There’s particulate organic matter, which is the stuff you generally can see. Mineral-associated organic matter, on the other hand, consists mostly of microscopic coatings on soil particles. They work differently.

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Soil carbon is a valuable resource but not all soil carbon is created equal

Myanmar’s Inle Lake Shows Bridge to Ancient Hydroponic Farming Systems

January 23, 2013 by  
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In today’s world, where a shift from large scale agribusiness to smaller scale, localized growing can be seen, ideas such as hydroponics and aquaponics have begun to take hold in the urban environment. However, we won’t be the first generation to have considered these possibilities. Indeed, hydroponics could possibly be attributed to Aztec cultures , but in Myanmar a large scale traditional hydroponics system can be located and is still being used today at Lake Inle. Hit the jump to learn about this historic growing process, and what we could learn from it. Read the rest of Myanmar’s Inle Lake Shows Bridge to Ancient Hydroponic Farming Systems Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable agriculture” , Biodegradable , burma , Drought , ethical farming , farming techniques , floating islands , hydroponics , Lake Inle , Myanmar , natural process , organic matter , sustainable farming , tomatoes , vegetables , water issues , water shortage , wetlands

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Myanmar’s Inle Lake Shows Bridge to Ancient Hydroponic Farming Systems

Behind the Scenes Look at Industrial-Scale Composting (Video)

October 21, 2010 by  
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Image credit: Videoprod From bicycle-based compost collection to city-wide mandatory composting , TreeHugger is a big fan of taking waste organic matter and putting it to good use. But what happens once your kitchen scraps and other organic waste are collected from your doorstep?

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Behind the Scenes Look at Industrial-Scale Composting (Video)

NASA Maps Growing Marine Dead Zones

July 23, 2010 by  
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NASA has created new maps showing the grim reality of marine dead zones.  These areas of deep water where oxygen levels are too low for marine life to survive have grown at a staggering pace since the middle of the 20th century. The dead zones are created when fertilizer run off from crops makes it into the ocean, creating massive algae blooms.  When the algae dies, it sinks to the bottom where microbes decompose the matter, which consumes oxygen and creates a suffocating environment for marine life

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NASA Maps Growing Marine Dead Zones

Invading Worms Menacing Hardwood Forests

March 15, 2010 by  
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Alex notes that earthworms are a hot topic in the forums ; the Spring issue of Ontario Nature Magazine looks at the subject of invading European earthworms, and Sharon Oosthoek writes that the very trait that makes the works the darling of gardeners everywhere makes them a menace in the forests. Evidently they are much better at munching through leaf litter, causing nutrients to leach away in the rain instead of binding them up in organic matter. …

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Invading Worms Menacing Hardwood Forests

Glaciers Feed the Ocean’s Food Webs

December 24, 2009 by  
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Image credit: untipografico /Flickr Glaciers are an important source for many of the world’s largest and most significant rivers, but new research is showing that they are also an essential support for the coastal and oceanic food webs. Dissolved organic matter, some more than 4,000 years old, is discharged by the glaciers and, in spite of its age, has proven to be a highly potent food source for mic… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Glaciers Feed the Ocean’s Food Webs

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