Pacific starfish bounce back after massive die-off

January 1, 2018 by  
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It may feel like it’s a constant stream of bad news for the environment, so brace yourself for something good. A few years ago, it seemed as though we may completely lose sea stars after a mysterious wasting syndrome rapidly killed millions of the creatures from Canada to Mexico. But this year, researchers say that starfish are making a massive comeback. Sea Star Wasting Syndrome, which is linked to warming waters , hit the West Coast from 2013 to 2014, causing starfish to sort of “melt,” dropping limbs, deflating and wasting away. But where sea stars had practically vanished in some areas, they can be seen popping up again. “They are coming back, big time,” said Darryl Deleske, a researcher for the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium . Related: Researchers in Oregon Expect Wasting Disease to Completely Wipe Out Starfish Populations in the Near Future These types of die-offs have happened every decade since the 1970s, but never on the scale of 2013. But lately, places that were completely devoid of starfish are filling up with them once again. Sadly, it isn’t time to celebrate, yet. While populations seem to be rebounding, the disease hasn’t completely disappeared. It appears to be active in Washington and has never completely stopped in California or Oregon. Still, experts are hopeful that future generations of sea stars will be more resilient to the disease. Via Phys.org Images via Unsplash and UCSC

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Pacific starfish bounce back after massive die-off

Tel Aviv builds world’s tallest block tower to honor 8-year-old cancer victim

January 1, 2018 by  
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Tel Aviv is shooting for the stars with the world’s tallest LEGO tower . Technically, the 118-foot tower is made out of LEGO and other toy bricks, and the attempt isn’t sponsored by LEGO, like other towers have been. Instead, this tower is a playful way to honor an 8-year old cancer victim named Omer Sayag. Embed from Getty Images window.gie=window.gie||function(c){(gie.q=gie.q||[]).push(c)};gie(function(){gie.widgets.load({id:’LK_n8Ge2RURt1djGz5PRkw’,sig:’yDrTFkOxwQULu4XBM14CfRxI62Hm_kzNZ_MoNE5oTTo=’,w:’594px’,h:’396px’,items:’898930378′,caption: true ,tld:’com’,is360: false })}); Milan and Budapest have both made attempts at the world’s tallest LEGO tower, although both were in collaboration with LEGO. Tel Aviv’s tower is a collaboration between Tel Aviv City Hall and Young Engineers, a program that uses LEGO blocks to help teach kids engineering. Omer Sayang lost his battle to cancer in 2014, and his teachers, knowing how much he loved to build, started a petition to build what is being called Omer’s Tower. Related: Hungary Builds World’s Tallest LEGO Tower Embed from Getty Images window.gie=window.gie||function(c){(gie.q=gie.q||[]).push(c)};gie(function(){gie.widgets.load({id:’HfCEwf1aSJJ8hV_iH3ewQA’,sig:’zIl0az1XJK5K9FWYnapqRC0KoPvzgf8ZAAtIRFpdzZY=’,w:’594px’,h:’396px’,items:’898928316′,caption: true ,tld:’com’,is360: false })}); The tower stretches 117 feet 11 inches and required a half million toy bricks. Thousands of people collaborated to realize its construction, marking it with their team insignias and positive messages. The measurements were sent to Guinness and now the team is waiting for official confirmation that the tower is, in fact, the tallest ever, beating Milan by 35 inches. Embed from Getty Images window.gie=window.gie||function(c){(gie.q=gie.q||[]).push(c)};gie(function(){gie.widgets.load({id:’Dhg7nk98SkBUJyx9FCHqsQ’,sig:’Gi2GkMIY6wzABbr2ze7xbejRs0UzlxJDU0hExwjZZRg=’,w:’594px’,h:’396px’,items:’898928182′,caption: true ,tld:’com’,is360: false })}); Via the New York Times Lead image via Unsplash

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Tel Aviv builds world’s tallest block tower to honor 8-year-old cancer victim

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