After the age of contagion, what’s the ‘new normal’?

March 23, 2020 by  
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As we begin to ponder our collective future post-coronavirus, the opportunity is ripe to accelerate sustainable outcomes. Will we?

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After the age of contagion, what’s the ‘new normal’?

Testing the mettle of the aluminum cup

March 23, 2020 by  
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Which is better: reusable, unrecyclable plastic or single-use, recyclable aluminum?

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Testing the mettle of the aluminum cup

Jad Dalay of American Forests on forests’ potential to mitigate climate change

November 13, 2019 by  
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Jad Dalay says using forests as a climate change solution offers the opportunity to capture carbon and create more green jobs.

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Jad Dalay of American Forests on forests’ potential to mitigate climate change

Yalmaz Siddiqui on MGM Resorts International’s approach to food waste management

November 13, 2019 by  
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Yalmaz Siddiqui says the company uses multiple programs to divert its food waste.

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Yalmaz Siddiqui on MGM Resorts International’s approach to food waste management

The Challenge & Opportunity To Make Our Drinking Water Safe Again

October 21, 2019 by  
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We live in a country where the drinking water we … The post The Challenge & Opportunity To Make Our Drinking Water Safe Again appeared first on Earth911.com.

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The Challenge & Opportunity To Make Our Drinking Water Safe Again

This undercover trend is electrifying trucks

July 24, 2019 by  
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As distribution logistics encourage regional delivery, the opportunity to electrify grows, too.

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This undercover trend is electrifying trucks

Report Report: Packaging, resiliency, extinction and the state of the transition

July 24, 2019 by  
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A monthly wrap-up of recent research on sustainable business and clean technology.

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Report Report: Packaging, resiliency, extinction and the state of the transition

Artificial intelligence makes waves in seafood traceability

July 24, 2019 by  
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From poaching to human rights infringements to the incursion of invasive species, AI promises to revolutionize tracking.

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Artificial intelligence makes waves in seafood traceability

New credit card limits spending based on carbon emissions

May 6, 2019 by  
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This Spring, the Swedish financial tech company Doconomy launched the first ever banking service and credit card to manage your personal finances and your daily carbon emissions . The DO Black Card is a collaborative effort with Doconomy, Mastercard and the UN Climate Change Secretariat. The card complements users’ existing banking services, but the accompanying app tracks the carbon emissions associated with each DO card purchase and caps the cardholder and the limits they set for themselves. Not only is the DO Credit Card the first to explicitly track carbon emissions associated with personal finance purchases, the physical card is also made from bio-sourced materials and printed with Air-Ink, a recycled ink made with air pollution particles such as the soot found in chimneys. Related: Lyft vows to help customers find electric vehicles with Green Mode In 2015, 175 countries signed onto the United Nation’s Paris Agreement, pledging to cut their carbon emissions. Big companies are also developing policies to reduce emissions, switch to renewable energy or engage in cap and trade programs. Citizens around the world are increasingly aware of the impacts of climate change and are making greener choices in their every day lives, such as reducing their plastic use. However, as Doctonomy mentions,  money is our most “powerful tool to tackle climate change in our daily action.” Through the launch of this card, the “banking with a conscience” company set out to reduce unsustainable consumption, cut carbon emissions and compensate for unavoidable emissions. “People are also thinking about the environment in their daily lives, including making more informed decisions about what they buy. That’s why we are pleased to welcome this initiative being undertaken by Doconomy,” said UN Climate Change executive secretary, Patricia Espinosa. Cardholders also have the opportunity to donate directly to the United Nation’s certified green projects , such as replacing traditional wood stoves with fuel efficient stoves in Malawi, or building wind farms in India. Card holders also receive credits for making “ environmentally-friendly ” purchases with participating stores. + Doconomy Via Dezeen Image via Mynewsdesk

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New credit card limits spending based on carbon emissions

Renewable energy surpasses coal for the first time in U.S. history

May 6, 2019 by  
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This April, for the first time in U.S. history, the renewable energy sector is expected to have generated more total electricity than coal. According to an initial report by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, this achievement is partially because of increased investment and awareness, but might also be due to seasonal changes in electricity consumption. “Five years ago, this never would have been close to happening,” Dennis Wamstead, research analyst at IEEFA, said in the report. “The transition that’s going on in the electric sector in the United States has been phenomenal.” Americans demand more renewable energy According to the IEEFA report, there has been increased investment in the wind and solar field, making the technology less expensive and more widely accessible. Increased awareness about climate change and the role of carbon emissions has also led local governments, businesses and residents to demand renewable energy policies and services. Related: Coal prices continue to rise, becoming more costly than solar and wind alternatives Renewable energy sources include hydro, geothermal , solar, wind and biomass energy, although solar and wind are the two sectors that have seen the most rapid upsurge. In fact, even major power companies are turning to renewable energy. Power giant Xcel Energy shut down 25 percent of its coal plants and plans to deliver zero-carbon electricity by 2050. Coal still reigns in the summertime Although this record-breaking achievement is exciting, energy experts also said that it could be partially explained by seasonal electricity demands. Many companies temporarily shut down coal plants for seasonal maintenance in the springtime, when electricity demands are lowest. There is also an abundance of wind and hydro energy during that time. However, once people start turning on their air conditioners around June, electricity production is expected to be dominated by coal and natural gas again. Despite the current federal government’s attempts to boost the coal industry, coal consumption has been steadily declining. In 2016, natural gas surpassed coal as America’s biggest source of electricity, with coal contributing 27 percent of electricity and natural gas contributing 35 percent. Although it is cleaner than coal, natural gas is still a fossil fuel and therefore contributes to climate change. The report also predicts that renewable energy will outshine coal in May, and going forward will sporadically compete with coal on a monthly basis. However, coal and natural gas are expected to dominate annual consumption patterns for several more years. + IEEFA Via CNN Images via   Zak Zak and Jeff Hitchcock

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Renewable energy surpasses coal for the first time in U.S. history

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