A clever, garden-filled facelift revives a derelict building in Denmark

November 5, 2020 by  
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Copenhagen-based architecture firm Tegnestuen LOKAL has radically reinvented one of the “ugliest” buildings in a Frederiksberg neighborhood with an innovative facade renovation that brings residents closer to nature and each other. The project — dubbed Ørsted Gardens — is the transformation of a 1960s concrete building that was notorious for its unwelcoming and dilapidated appearance. Instead of a simple facade renovation, the architects decided to dramatically alter the building’s appearance by inserting a series of triangular glass bays that serve as semi-private decks with 50 small gardens.  What began as an ordinary facade renovation aimed at protecting the concrete balconies from water damage gradually morphed into a complete overhaul of the front facade during the design process. Instead of simply reinforcing the open balconies with glazed panels, the architects inserted triangular glass bays to create new semi-private social spaces that would encourage random meetings between residents. The addition of operable glass panels also allow the balconies to be comfortably used from spring to fall and helps to buffer the apartments from the noise of the heavily trafficked road in front of the building. Related: HHF Architects’ renovated a group of crumbling buildings to help revitalize an entire neighborhood “A central aspect of the renovation is the notion that the building should contribute positively to the experience of the street,” the architects said. “The monotonous façade of the past is broken up into smaller geometric entities creating a sense of rhythm as you pass the building signaling a residential building, comprised of many families and individuals.” In addition to introducing an attractive, geometric facade that can be appreciated from both inside the building and the street level, the architects have also infused the apartments with greenery. Each glass bay accommodates a small garden that grows across the glazed facade to blur the boundaries between inside and out. Residents are also free to use their semi-private garden plots to grow decorative plants or vegetables. + Tegnestuen LOKAL Photography by Hampus Berndtson via Tegnestuen LOKAL

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A clever, garden-filled facelift revives a derelict building in Denmark

Sunderlands riverfront to house UKs first carbon-neutral community

November 5, 2020 by  
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Northern England’s post-industrial port city of Sunderland will soon welcome a major riverside regeneration as part of an eco-friendly masterplan designed by FaulknerBrowns Architects and Proctor & Matthews Architects . Developed for Sunderland City Council and developers Igloo Regeneration, the urban revitalization project will transform a 33.2-hectare site on both sides of the River Wear into the country’s first carbon-neutral urban quarter.  Designed to “reinvent the heart of Sunderland,” the masterplan design will include 1,000 new energy-efficient homes in four mixed-use residential neighborhoods for a population of 2,500. Each neighborhood will have a distinctive character and feature a mix of three housing types inspired by local and regional antecedents, from the iconic Sunderland cottage to the Wearside maisonettes. The masterplan also includes 1 million square feet of office space in a new central business district that’s expected to provide up to 10,000 new jobs. Related: PAU unveils carbon-neutral Sunnyside Yard masterplan in NYC The five urban districts — Vaux, Sheepfolds, Farringdon Row, Heart of the City and Ayre’s Quay — will be connected by a new Riverside Park that will be the main focal point of the development and account for approximately half of the project’s total site area. St. Mary’s Boulevard will also be upgraded to better connect the riverside to the city through the park, while new bridges will strengthen connections between the communities on both sides of the river. Cultural highlights will include the Culture House, a state-of-the-art library and community hub, as well as a new arts center, by Flanagan Lawrence, to be housed within a renovated 1907 fire station. “The masterplan aims to maximise the drama of ‘living on the edge’, with views of the river, the gorge and abundant green space,” the architects explained. “The restoration and re-invention of a built edge on the cliff tops overlooking the river will create a signature silhouette for the city.” Renewables and smart energy networks will be promoted throughout the masterplan to help achieve the project’s carbon-neutral status. + FaulknerBrowns Architects Images via FaulknerBrowns Architects

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Sunderlands riverfront to house UKs first carbon-neutral community

A terracotta home keeps naturally cool in one of Thailands hottest regions

July 30, 2018 by  
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The Thai province of Kanchanaburi is one of the country’s hottest regions, with a tropical savanna climate and annual temperature averages of over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. So when Bangkok-based design practice Anghin Architecture set out to create a new addition to a riverside house it designed years ago, the team prioritized passive cooling throughout. Taking advantage of the site’s topography, the terracotta home is positioned for optimal air circulation and cross ventilation to maximize comfort while minimizing energy consumption. Named the Kanchanaburi House Phase II, the structure spans a little more than 2,300 square feet and is covered in red terracotta cladding to match the appearance of the original home. The annex, set near a river, provides elevated views of the water and also offers leisure facilities for the homeowner and her guests. Raised off the ground, the building includes the parking pad and storage space on the lower level. The upper floor consists of a guest room, bathroom and spacious Pilates room flanked with balconies on the north end; an open-plan living space, play area and bar area in the middle; and an expansive outdoor entertaining terrace on the south end that looks out over the river. Related: Brilliant zero-energy air conditioner in India is beautiful and functional “Tackling energy consumption was our main focus,” Anghin Architecture said. “The house was designed to maximize comfort through a passive cooling system. We make use of the site’s topography by elevating the house to allow for better air circulation. In addition to cross ventilation at the main level, the air shaft was designed to help further ventilate the ceiling by allowing the cooler air from underneath the house to move up and disperse the heat collected under the roof. The northern opening ensures thorough illumination without the direct sunlight penetration, while the extended wall fins and retractable awning keep the house properly shaded.” + Anghin Architecture Via ArchDaily Images by Gregoire Glachant

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A terracotta home keeps naturally cool in one of Thailands hottest regions

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