Los Angeles County to begin phasing out oil and gas drilling

September 17, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

When people think of  Los Angeles , celebrities and fast cars probably come to mind before oil and gas drilling. But the county has a surprising number of active and abandoned wells. On Wednesday, Los Angeles County supervisors said no more drilling. As County Supervisor Janice Hahn put it, the plan is “a framework for how we transition from dirty  fossil fuels  to clean energy and make sure we bring our labor partners with us.” L.A. County currently has 1,046 active oil wells, 637 idle wells and 2,731 abandoned wells. The supervisors voted to start a program that will make sure the wells are properly closed and the land cleaned up. The county will also expand a task force to help fossil fuel workers transition to another kind of employment. Related: Big Oil is in big trouble as courts, shareholders demand accountability “The goal is to provide direction to county departments to begin addressing the variety of issues, environmental and climate impacts created by these active and inactive  oil  and gas wells,” said Supervisor Holly J. Mitchell, as reported by EcoWatch. Mitchell’s district includes Inglewood Oil Field, one of the country’s largest urban oil fields. Owned by Sentinel Peak Resources, Inglewood covers 1,000 acres and contains more than half the gas and oil wells found in L.A. County’s unincorporated area. In the last decade, Inglewood produced between 2.5 million and 3.1 million barrels of oil per year. Closing Inglewood Oil Field will probably delight many locals and help them breathe deeply again. Residents of nearby Ladera Heights, Baldwin Hills and View Park have been complaining of bad smells and worrying about the oil field’s impact on their  health  for years. Some have seen oil bubbling up in sidewalk cracks. “There are tens of thousands of people who live in very close proximity to oil wells, 73% of whom are people of color,” said Mitchell. “So, for me, it really is an  equity issue .” Via EcoWatch Lead image via Pixabay

Read the original post:
Los Angeles County to begin phasing out oil and gas drilling

Stop Line 3 protests continue at Minnesota capitol

August 27, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Stop Line 3 protests continue at Minnesota capitol

About 2,000 demonstrators rallied at the  Minnesota  State Capitol on Wednesday as part of a week of action called “Treaties Not Tar Sands.” The movement is reacting to Enbridge’s Line 3 pipeline, which could carry 750,000 barrels of tar sands oil from Alberta, Canada to Wisconsin every day. Indigenous people and environmentalists led the protest. The pipeline violates treaty rights and endangers clean water, say the protestors. Some Indigenous leaders walked more than 250 miles of the pipeline’s route to attend the Saint Paul rally. Related: Enbridge Line 3 pipeline protestors brutally arrested “We’re here in ceremony. We’re here to assert our treaty rights and our right to exist and our right to clean  water ,” Nancy Beaulieu, a founder of the Resilient Indigenous Sisters Engaging Coalition, said Wednesday, as reported by Common Dreams. “Line 3 violates our treaty and all the treaties along the Mississippi because the water flows. This is a people’s problem, this is not just a Native issue here.” Wednesday’s rally came in response to the Minnesota Supreme Court upholding state regulators’ decision to let Enbridge continue  construction . Protestors are running out of legal options to halt the project. The  pipeline  first won approval during the Trump administration. But Biden’s Justice Department backed it, too, much to the horror of opponents. Minnesota’s Democratic governor, Tim Walz, has also supported the Line 3 project. Line 3 refers to replacing 300 plus miles of existing pipeline. The entire system runs 1,097 miles. Environmentalists are also worried about  climate  impact. One estimate predicts that the Line 3 project will be as detrimental as building 50 new coal-fired power plants. “This pipeline’s dangerous effects on the environment, surrounding communities, and Tribal groups will be irreversible,” said Representative Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.), chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus. “The Biden administration must immediately suspend Line 3’s  Clean Water Act  permit and conduct a full environmental impact statement.” Via Common Dreams Lead image via Fibonacci Blue

Original post:
Stop Line 3 protests continue at Minnesota capitol

White House pushes oil amid code red climate crisis

August 16, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on White House pushes oil amid code red climate crisis

President Joe  Biden , that supposed proponent of green infrastructure, surprised many environmentally conscious folks on Wednesday. White House national security adviser Jake Sullivan issued a statement asking for the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) to pump more oil. Why? In a classic wish for instant gratification, Biden’s White House is choosing the short-term goal of keeping  gas  prices down over the long-term goal of an inhabitable planet. Related: It’s code red for Earth, says new UN study “Higher gasoline costs, if left unchecked, risk harming the ongoing global recovery,” Sullivan’s statement read, in part. “The price of crude  oil  has been higher than it was at the end of 2019, before the onset of the pandemic.” So, can you increase  fossil fuel  production while simultaneously cutting emissions? Uh, no. Expanding fossil fuel capacity is not part of any plan to reach net zero by 2050. We can’t have it both ways. But the problem is that it’s hard to focus on long-term planet goals when so many Americans are a few hundred bucks away from disaster. In May, the national average gas price increased to over three dollars per gallon for the first time since 2014. As gas prices rise, households have less  money  to spend on other useful things, like food and bills. Sarah Hunt, CEO of the Joseph Rainey Center for Public Policy, tweeted that Biden’s OPEC request is an example of the fact that “we are not going to choose a habitable planet tomorrow over quality of life today.” In another tweet, she said, “People want cheap  energy  more than they want clean energy. People don’t want cheap energy produced in their backyard.” Biden also managed to irritate conservatives, who want energy jobs in the  U.S.  rather than increasing reliance on overseas fossil fuels. According to Hunt, the only answer “is to innovate for better energy with fewer externalities.”  Via The Guardian , Huff Post Lead image via Pixabay

Go here to see the original: 
White House pushes oil amid code red climate crisis

Exxon lobbyist’s gaffes expose attempts to block climate policies

July 6, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Exxon lobbyist’s gaffes expose attempts to block climate policies

Everybody says things in private they wouldn’t want publicly broadcast. But when you’re in a very public role, you need to watch what you say carefully, as Exxon Mobil lobbyist Keith McCoy was reminded this week when his indiscreet comments went viral. Greenpeace released video clips of McCoy talking to undercover activists posing as job recruiters. McCoy discussed his lobbying strategies, such as working with “shadow groups” and trying to influence senators to oppose climate elements of President Biden’s infrastructure overhaul. He boasted that he talked to West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin’s office every week, attempting to block policies that would hurt Exxon. Realted: Exxon’s leaked documents reveal devastating pollution plan The oil giant, of course, is trying to distance itself from McCoy’s embarrassing comments. Darren Woods, chairman and CEO of Exxon Mobil, released a statement saying that McCoy’s words do not represent Exxon’s views. “We condemn the statements and are deeply apologetic for them, including comments regarding interactions with elected officials,” he said. The company has reiterated that it really, truly supports the Paris climate agreement . McCoy, too, is trying to distance himself from, well, himself. He wrote on LinkedIn, “I am deeply embarrassed by my comments and that I allowed myself to fall for Greenpeace’s deception. My statements clearly do not represent ExxonMobil’s positions on important public policy issues.” The unfortunate comments come at a perfect time to be used against Exxon in upcoming congressional hearings about oil companies and climate change . “We demand Congress immediately investigate Exxon and fossil fuel companies’ climate crimes, and make polluters pay for their destruction,” said Lindsay Meiman of the climate activist group 350.org, as reported by NPR . Representative Ro Khanna chairs the House Oversight and Reform Subcommittee on the Environment. He said that he will hold a hearing this coming fall regarding “climate disinformation & the coordinated attack on scientific truth among polluters and their lobbyists.” Khanna plans to call Exxon, Chevron and other fossil fuel company CEOs to testify. Via NPR Image via Mike Mozart

See more here: 
Exxon lobbyist’s gaffes expose attempts to block climate policies

California couple fined $18,000 for destroying Joshua trees

July 6, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on California couple fined $18,000 for destroying Joshua trees

A California-based couple, Jeffrey Walter and Jonetta Nordberg-Walter, face a fine of $18,000 after uprooting 36 Joshua trees to build a new house. The couple was fined after an anonymous neighbor sent a tip to the California Fish and Wildlife Department. The neighbor is said to have witnessed the trees being bulldozed and buried during the construction of the new home. According to California Fish and Wildlife Department officials, the neighbor had warned the Morongo Basin couple about the consequences of bulldozing the trees , but the couple ignored the warning. Joshua trees are protected in California, and anyone found cutting them is likely to be sued.  Related: California votes to protect Joshua trees Nathaniel Arnold, deputy chief of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife law enforcement division, said that protecting the endangered Joshua trees depends on locals who are passionate about the species. “Most California citizens who reside in Joshua Tree habitat revere these iconic desert species, more so now than ever because of its degraded population status,” Arnold said. Arnold commended the work done by the resident who out the tip about the destruction of Joshua trees . He says that such a move could serve as a deterrent to those who wish to destroy the trees. “We’re pleased to see the citizen tip led to a successful disposition and we hope it serves as a deterrent to others who may think it is acceptable to unlawfully remove Joshua trees to make way for development,” Arnold added. California wildlife officials are now considering having Joshua trees protected under the Endangered Species Act. Global warming has made it almost impossible for Joshua trees to thrive. In 2020, California’s Dome wildfire consumed over 43,000 acres of Joshua tree woodland . Based on the  National Park Service  data, this single event led to the destruction of about 1.3 million Joshua trees. There are also many documented incidences where fires or individuals have led to the destruction of Joshua trees. In 2019, Joshua Tree National Park was closed temporarily following increased instances of Joshua tree destruction. Following the latest ruling, Walter and Nordberg-Walter were required by the court to each pay $9,000 for the destroyed trees. However, they can earn credit toward the fine if they volunteer at Joshua Tree National Park or the Mojave Desert Land Trust. Via Washington Post Images via San Bernardino County District Attorney

Go here to read the rest:
California couple fined $18,000 for destroying Joshua trees

A botanic garden to save an endangered Colombian ecosystem

July 6, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A botanic garden to save an endangered Colombian ecosystem

South America is often depicted as a lush landscape full of diverse ecosystems. And once, Colombia was like that. But today, mining, deforestation, extensive cattle ranching and draining of the wetlands in favor of urban development have threatened the country’s ecosystems and devastated the natural landscape. A project named El Tropicario seeks to raise awareness of these environmental problems and create a space where native plant lif e can be studied and preserved. The project seeks to conserve wax palms, Colombia’s national tree, among achieving other goals. The wax palms that are native to Colombia live for more than 100 years, and they are in danger of extinction. Related: This Colombian modular home is surrounded by Monkeypod trees El Tropicario is part of a huge botanical garden that serves as a center of education for environmental threats and as a space to preserve native plant life. The design includes floating wetland spaces, an environment that has all but disappeared on the Bogotá Savanna. There are six collections in the botanical garden: humid forest, dry forest, useful plants, special collections, biodiversity and superpáramos. The botanical garden is designed with passive temperature control systems that don’t need mechanical ventilation. The glass used in the design is made up of different thicknesses and filters. Automated systems are integrated to help control the temperature. Each structure is designed to capture rainwater and collect it in a large reservoir. This creates a closed cycle that provides irrigation for the plants. The gardens’ support system uses concrete pillars driven deep into the ground. These pillars surround the perimeter and support the metal structure of the gardens. This creates a self-supporting, “structural basket” design where no columns or supports are needed inside. Without columns inside, the interior spaces can include more soil for deep seeding. The design prioritizes plant life and creates a space for plants to thrive. + DARP Via ArchDaily Photography © Mauricio Carvajal

Excerpt from: 
A botanic garden to save an endangered Colombian ecosystem

Oil rig explodes in the middle of Lake Pontchartrain, injuring several near New Orleans

October 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Oil rig explodes in the middle of Lake Pontchartrain, injuring several near New Orleans

An oil rig on Lake Pontchartrain exploded on Sunday night in Kenner, Louisiana , home of the Louis Armstrong International Airport and only a few miles from New Orleans . Authorities began receiving calls about the explosion around 7:18 PM on Sunday; although no official explanation has been offered, authorities on the scene believe the explosion was caused by flammable cleaning chemicals on the oil rig’s surface. At least seven people were injured in the blast and, according to initial reporting, one person is missing. Many of the injuries were serious and authorities expected more to be reported in the near future. Lake Pontchartrain is a brackish body of water that is about 12-14 feet deep, though some shipping channels are dredged deeper, and covers 630 square miles to the north of New Orleans. The exploding rig in the Lake is owned by Clovelly Oil Co., which uses the structure for transferring oil . It is possible that oil is still leaking into Lake Pontchartrain, though this will not affect local drinking water, which is sourced from the Mississippi River. Local residents report having their homes rattled when the explosion occurred. “My house actually shook,” said Andrew Love, who lives in the area. “At first I thought it was a sonic boom or something, I had no idea what was happening.” No damage to homes has yet been reported. Related: New NASA study reveals just how fast New Orleans is sinking George Branigan was sitting at home with his wife and stepdaughter when the explosion happened. “We heard something blow up and it sounded like it was in my backyard ,” Branigan said. After going outside to investigate, Branigan heard what sounded to him to be small pebbles, likely debris from the explosion, falling on his home. Branigan was still watching the flames from his porch several hours after the explosion. Via the New Orleans Advocate and San Francisco Gate Images via  City of Kenner Government

View original post here: 
Oil rig explodes in the middle of Lake Pontchartrain, injuring several near New Orleans

Dakota Access pipeline springs first oil leak – before completion

May 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Dakota Access pipeline springs first oil leak – before completion

Before the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) was even completed, it suffered its first leak. On April 6, the $3.8 billion project spilled 84 gallons of crude oil at a South Dakota pump station, enraging members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and other activists who protested its development for nearly one year. The Guardian reports that the leak was quickly contained and cleaned. However, critics of the spill say that the environmental travesty could have been prevented had state officials listened to concerned members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and those who support them. The pipeline was in its final stages of preparing to transport oil when the leak occurred. Beginning in April of 2016, thousands of people gathered near Cannon Ball, ND, to protest the DAPL ’s development. The main concerns continue to be that its construction could contaminate the Missouri river and that a portion of land the DAPL runs through was promised to the Standing Rock Sioux in an 1851 treaty. Though the Obama administration halted the DAPL’s development in December of 2016, President Trump ordered it to resume shortly after his inauguration. Activists were forcibly removed from the protest grounds. Jan Hasselman, a lawyer for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, said, “They keep telling everybody that it is state of the art, that leaks won’t happen, that nothing can go wrong. It’s always been false. They haven’t even turned the thing on and it’s shown to be false.” “It doesn’t give us any pleasure to say, ‘I told you so.’ But we have said from the beginning that it’s not a matter of if, but when. Pipelines leak and they spill. It’s just what happens,” she added. The Standing Rock Sioux tribe, which has fought Energy Transfer Partners and the U.S. government in court, argues that the project requires a full environmental study to assess the risks. Because President Trump has financial ties to the oil company, however, it is unlikely such an assessment will be conducted. Standing Rock Sioux tribe chairman Dave Archambault II said the spill is just one more sign the courts should intervene. “Our lawsuit challenging this dangerous project is ongoing, and it’s more important than ever for the court to step in and halt additional accidents before they happen – not just for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and our resources but for the 17 million people whose drinking water is at risk,” he said in a statement. Related: Major oil spill 150 miles from DAPL protest validates Standing Rock concerns Neither the company nor the state have made a public announcement about the spill . According to Brian Walsh, an environmental scientist with the South Dakota department of environment and natural resources, this is because the spill was relatively minor as it was caused by a mechanical failure at a surge pump. “It’s not uncommon to have a small release at a pump station,” said Walsh, adding that the company responded immediately and cleaned up the liquid petroleum. Via The Guardian

View post: 
Dakota Access pipeline springs first oil leak – before completion

This modern log home in Finland is heated by the earth

May 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This modern log home in Finland is heated by the earth

This may look like a traditional log home, but unlike other homes, it can withstand harsh winters and freezing temperatures down to -30°C (-22°F) without a huge impact on the environment. Finnish architecture firm Pluspuu Oy designed the Log Villa house in Finland as an energy efficient modern residence for cold climates that offers optimal living conditions thanks to a well-insulated envelope and the use of geothermal energy. The Log Villa sits near a beautiful lake in Central Finland and offers panoramic views of the surrounding landscape. Thick laminated timber logs constitute the envelope and features three-layer glued pine as the outer layer. This allows the structure to withstand extremely low temperatures. Although the design references traditional log buildings of the region, the villa’s envelope has no overlaps or visible cross corners. Related: Four-Cornered Villa is an Off-Grid Minimalist Retreat in Finland Geothermal energy is the main source of heat, which is pumped out of a well drilled in the ground. During the summer, when temperatures can go up to 30°C, cool air is pumped from the ground into the building. Triple-glazed thermal glass and blown-in wood fiber insulation make the envelope airtight and contributes to the ecological construction approach. + Pluspuu Oy Via Archdaily Photos by Samuli Miettinen

Read more from the original source: 
This modern log home in Finland is heated by the earth

Big Oil celebrates Trump’s goal to open up drilling in national parks

January 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Big Oil celebrates Trump’s goal to open up drilling in national parks

How should the government best manage America’s national parks ? It’s a question that has provoked debate for years, and President-elect Donald Trump ‘s pro- fossil fuel campaign pledges have ignited even more controversy. As he will be inaugurated later this month, oil industry members expressed delight at the potential of more leases to drill or mine the vast amounts of oil , coal, natural gas, and uranium hiding on those contentious federal lands. During President Obama ‘s time in office, the number of leases for mining and drilling stagnated, but Trump promised to “unleash America’s $50 trillion in untapped shale, oil, and natural gas reserves” and might be able accomplish that through new leases to drill for fossil fuel companies. Big Oil is thrilled with that goal; American Petroleum Institute CEO Jack Gerard told Reuters, “This opportunity is unique, maybe once in a lifetime.” Related: Obama creates two new western national monuments in last minute effort During his campaign, Trump said Obama denied “millions of Americans access to the energy wealth sitting under our feet,” in part by restricting leases. Some people agree with him, such as former U.S. Bureau of Land Management officer Bob Turri who lives amidst a federal forest in Utah and told Reuters, “We can’t maintain our families here because there are no jobs. That’s the only hope we have left, is what Trump may be able to do for us.” Federal land oil output accounted for around one fifth of the country’s total oil output in 2015, according to Reuters, after comprising over one third of oil output in 2010. In a late November blog post , the Trump-Pence Transition Team said, “Rather than continuing the current path to undermine and block America’s fossil fuel reserves, the Trump Administration will encourage the production of these resources by opening onshore and offshore leasing on federal lands and waters.” In the very same post they said they plan to conserve “our wonderful natural resources and beautiful natural habitats.” If they’re actually committed to the latter promise as they claim, perhaps they should take a closer look at the havoc drilling has wreaked on the environment in the past . Via Reuters and EcoWatch Images via brewbooks on Flickr ( 1 , 2 )

Read more from the original source: 
Big Oil celebrates Trump’s goal to open up drilling in national parks

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 8544 access attempts in the last 7 days.