US Army delays Dakota Access Pipeline on Corps lands near Lake Oahe

November 15, 2016 by  
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Standing Rock Sioux members and their supporters protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline just got a piece of good news. Yesterday the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued a statement on the pipeline saying before they’re willing to grant an easement to Energy Transfer Partners , they want to hold more discussions with the tribe. They said that during these conversations, pipeline construction near Lake Oahe on Corps land will halt. The Army said it has finished its review begun September 9, 2016, and has determined “additional discussion and analysis are warranted in light of the history of the Great Sioux Nation’s dispossessions of lands” and because of how important Lake Oahe is to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe . Related: President Obama says Army is exploring rerouting the Dakota Access Pipeline The Army’s statement doesn’t completely stop the Dakota Access Pipeline. Rather, the goal of the discussions they mention is to talk about easement conditions to lower the risk of ruptures or spills along the oil pipeline and expedite response to such disasters “or otherwise enhance the protection of Lake Oahe and the Tribe’s water supplies.” In a statement in response to the Army letter, Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chair Dave Archambault II said, “We are encouraged and know that the peaceful prayer and demonstration at Standing Rock have powerfully brought to light the unjust narrative suffered by tribal nations and Native Americans across the country…Not all our prayers were answered, but this time, they were heard.” The Army made it clear they have not yet decided whether or not they will grant Energy Transfer Partners an easement, which the company needs to construct the part of the pipeline that goes underneath the Missouri River at Lake Oahe. While discussions are held, “construction on or under Corps land bordering Lake Oahe cannot occur.” Via NBC News Images via Fibonacci Blue on Flickr and Takver on Flickr

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US Army delays Dakota Access Pipeline on Corps lands near Lake Oahe

Innovative recycled ceramic bricks keep this Hanoi house’s interior fresh and clean

November 15, 2016 by  
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The building features an interesting double-skin facade and several voids in its interior. These elements improve the quality of indoor air and work with, not against, the tropical weather conditions of the region. The outer layer is made of recycled ceramic bricks that help purify dust and smoke and suck in fresh air. Related: These LEGO-like recycled plastic bricks create sturdy homes for just $5,200 Open panels help cool down interior spaces and promote the interaction between the inner and outer scenery. Randomly arranged pot plants absorb humidity and mitigate calorific radiation. The house creates a “natural sense of breathing rhythm” and presents a healthier alternative to what’s being built in Dong Anh. + H&P Architects Via Archdaily Photos by Nguyen Tien Thanh

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Innovative recycled ceramic bricks keep this Hanoi house’s interior fresh and clean

Dakota Access Pipeline protesters raise over $1 million on GoFundMe

October 31, 2016 by  
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Back in April, North Dakota Access Pipeline protesters started a GoFundMe campaign to raise money for basic camp needs like blankets and food. Now the crowdfunding campaign has raised over $1 million. As the camp prepares for the cold North Dakota winter , when temperatures often hover below freezing, they’re asking for supplies like winter clothes and sleeping bags. Protester Howaste Wakiya started the official Sacred Stone Camp GoFundMe page on April 19 on behalf of one of the camp founders, LaDonna Brave Bull Allard. He wrote, “This is a prayer camp movement to save our sacred land and water and has been entirely supported by the people and the campers.” Related: Armed police arrest 141 protesters over Dakota Access Pipeline Donations began to roll in as the camp grew. Wakiya reported in an update on the GoFundMe page two months ago that the camp swelled from 50 people to 2,000 people in just a week. As law enforcement arrested protesters, funds gathered on the page also began to go towards bail and court costs. About a month ago, Wakiya wrote an update saying that as the camp readies itself for winter, they needed supplies like wood stoves and teepee liners. The camp has been able to use some wind and solar power , but according to the Sacred Stone Camp website have only limited means of generating such clean energies. Just this week Wakiya requested 40 additional solar panels. The camp is asking for firewood as one of their ” biggest winter needs .” Sacred Stone Camp has an Amazon wishlist which includes items like a snow thrower, log splitter, and wind turbine generator kit. There’s also a FundRazr page to raise money for legal defense. Over 15,000 people have contributed over $800,000 out of a goal of $1 million. + Sacred Stone Camp GoFundMe + Sacred Stone Camp Images via Tony Webster on Flickr and Sacred Stone Camp Facebook

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Dakota Access Pipeline protesters raise over $1 million on GoFundMe

Judge rejects riot charges against journalist Amy Goodman for Dakota Access Pipeline coverage

October 18, 2016 by  
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A North Dakota judge has thrown out charges against journalist Amy Goodman after she filmed oil company security using pepper spray and dogs on protesters at the Dakota Access Pipeline . The Democracy Now! host could have spent multiple months in jail if Judge John Grinsteiner hadn’t rejected the charges in a move widely praised for upholding freedom of the press. At first the state attorney office of North Dakota charged Goodman with “criminal trespass,” but later decided to switch to riot charges after they admitted “legal issues with providing the notice of trespassing requirements in the statute,” as reported by Democracy Now! Related: Oil company sics attack dogs on Native American protesters in North Dakota State attorney Ladd Erickson did his best to charge Goodman with something; he told a local newspaper she was “a protester, basically,” and that she was only working to justify actions taken by protesters. He said in an email she “was not acting as a journalist” even though the first trespass complaint described Goodman as a reporter since she identified herself on camera and conducted interviews. Goodman could have spent as much as a year in jail if the riot charges hadn’t been rejected. One of her lawyers, Reed Brody told The Guardian the disturbing case was a “real outlier in general.” But the state attorney’s office may already be trying to pin Goodman down on another charge. Local county sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier said in a statement, “I am assured charges are being considered against these individuals. Let me make this perfectly clear, if you trespass on private property, you will be arrested.” For now, many people are thrilled freedom of the press won the day. In a Democracy Now! article, Goodman said, “This is a complete vindication of my right as a journalist to cover the attack on the protesters, and of the public’s right to know what is happening with the Dakota Access pipeline. We will continue to report on this epic struggle of Native Americans and their non-Native allies taking on the fossil fuel industry and an increasingly militarized police in this time when climate change threatens the planet.” Via The Guardian and Democracy Now! Images via Amy Goodman Facebook and screenshot

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Judge rejects riot charges against journalist Amy Goodman for Dakota Access Pipeline coverage

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