This skincare and natural deodorant is made from apple cider vinegar

February 27, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This skincare and natural deodorant is made from apple cider vinegar

Transitioning to natural skincare isn’t always easy. If you’ve used conventional products for years, it can take some time for your skin to eliminate the build-up of chemicals. Sway is hoping to help with that transition with a line of detoxing natural deodorants and new vegan and cruelty-free skincare, all of which is primarily made from apple cider vinegar. Sway’s mission is to gently help your body adjust from a lifetime of personal care products laden with toxins, synthetic fragrances and more icky ingredients to items made from natural ingredients, like apple cider vinegar, witch hazel, aloe vera and rose water. While anyone can make the switch, Sway’s products aid your body in detoxing years of build-up of chemicals, such as the aluminum used in antiperspirants. Moving from conventional body care items to plant-based products can often cause itchiness and irritation, but using carefully selected ingredients, Sway makes the transition comfortable, quick and easy. Related: These are our favorite beauty retailers from the Indie Beauty Expo We tested Sway at the Indie Beauty Expo in Los Angeles , and we were blown away. Founder Rebecca So is as passionate about skincare as she is about natural ingredients — she helped us try all of her products and explained the ingredients and health benefits of each and every one. Naturally, we decided to push the products to the limit by trying them for several weeks at home, the office, the gym and any other general, everyday situation we could think of. Sway’s claim to fame is a detoxing deodorant as well as an armpit mask. The deodorant’s main ingredient is organic apple cider vinegar. While the deodorant is lightly scented (we tried vanilla), it’s clear upon opening that ACV is the star of the show. Luckily, this smell dissipates quickly. Interestingly enough, this deodorant was originally developed as a face toner, which shows just how gentle it is for skin. Alone, the deodorant works best if you reapply a couple times throughout the day, especially if you are in the process of ditching antiperspirant. While it doesn’t block sweat (and it shouldn’t — sweating is a natural bodily function!), it does keep unpleasant odors at bay. It does take awhile to dry, so it is recommended that you apply it right after a shower and as you get ready for the day. This does make a reapplication more difficult, but Sway offers a dry dusting powder that helps the deodorant last longer. We have not tested the powder, but it would be great to help cut back on the need to reapply the deodorant. The armpit mask is completely game-changing. It’s a charcoal-based mask, not unlike a mud mask you’d use to wind down on a lazy Sunday evening. Other impressive ingredients include the brand’s beloved ACV, as well as bentonite clay and jojoba oil. Together, this roster of plant-based materials helps remove chemical build-up, particularly aluminum, from under the arm. It smooths dryness and flakiness and makes transitioning to natural deodorant simple. Long-term use of antiperspirant is also known to cause underarm discoloration, and this mask helps even out the skin tone in this area. It’s easy (and admittedly pretty fun) to apply, and a quick hop in the shower rinses the mask and all the gunk away. Sway also debuted a brand new line of natural skincare at IBELA, and we’ve been talking about it ever since. Particularly appealing, the cucumber face toner, the Vitamin C serum and the daily moisturizer have all become integrated into our all-natural morning skincare routines. The texture of each is very light, while still providing plenty of moisture to dry, wintry skin. The smell is nice, too — each offers a refreshing, slightly fruity scent. “Extending the same philosophy we used to develop our detox deodorant, we recently launched our skincare line that offers total body care solutions,” So said. “We understand using only flower extracts and oils cannot change the appearance of wrinkles, so we combine the best of nature with biotechnology in making our products. As you can see, all our products are jam-packed with high-quality ingredients, such as peptides, apple stem cell, etc. without the price tag.” + Sway Images via Inhabitat Editor’s Note: This product review is not sponsored by Sway. All opinions on the products and company are the author’s own.

See the original post here: 
This skincare and natural deodorant is made from apple cider vinegar

Two energy-efficient cork homes are elevated off the landscape in northern Spain

February 27, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Two energy-efficient cork homes are elevated off the landscape in northern Spain

Barcelona-based firm López-Rivera Arquitectos has unveiled two beautiful homes tucked into a dense forest in northern Spain. The natural forest, which is comprised of cork and pine trees, inspired the architects to clad both homes in a gorgeous cork facade . The sustainable material helped create an energy-efficient and resilient design that is also raised off the ground to reduce the impact on the landscape. Located in Platfrugell, Catalonia, the two cork houses are located on a rugged landscape, marked by uneven and steep terrain. The challenging topography, as well as the architects’ respect for nature, inspired the design to go vertical. Anchored into a strong base of concrete, the two homes are elevated on cross-laminated timber supports, which were locally-sourced. Related: Solar-powered cork house pursues healthy, sustainable living Both of the homes are entirely clad in two layers of cork to connect the homes into the environment, which is a dense, wooded landscape dominated by the presence of cork trees. The designers also chose the material for its durable and long-lasting features, and for its ability to tightly insulate the homes, conserving energy throughout the year. In fact, the project’s many passive features have earned both of the homes a Class A energy rating. The interior design of the two structures was also based on their natural setting. The wooden walls were left exposed to continue the cabin-the-woods atmosphere. To keep the residents warm and cozy in the cold months, the ceramic-tiled floors are heated through a system of underfloor heating. During the summer months, the adjustable casement wood windows enable almost constant air ventilation  through the interior. For those searing hot days, an adjacent swimming pool is the perfect cool-down spot. With no hallways and rooms of varying sizes, the living spaces were arranged so that there is no clear distinction between them. According to the architects, this was strategic so that the interior spaces would be defined by their relationship to the outdoors. Large open-air decks are at the heart of the design and offer stunning views of the surrounding forest as well as distant views of the sea. + López-Rivera Arquitectos Photos by José Hevia and Juande Jarrillo via López-Rivera Arquitectos

Originally posted here: 
Two energy-efficient cork homes are elevated off the landscape in northern Spain

Designer creates algae-sourced alternative for plastic packaging

February 27, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Designer creates algae-sourced alternative for plastic packaging

Food packaging has a become a target in the world of sustainability and environmentalism. Walk down the aisle of any supermarket or look in your own shopping cart, and you’re likely to see package after package made from petroleum-based plastic. A few resourceful scientists and engineers have chosen to tackle the problem, including designer Margarita Talep, who has developed an algae-based alternative to plastic. With the short lifecycle of most packaging, Talep wanted to create a material that would stand up to the task of holding food and other products but break down quickly once it hit the waste stream. Related: Nuatan is the bioplastic that could answer the plastic pollution crisis Agar, a gel-like substance sourced from seaweed, is not new to the food world, as it is commonly used as a food thickener. With that understanding, Talep heats the agar to create a polymer and then adds water as a plasticizer and natural dyes for color. To achieve the goal of all-natural ingredients, natural dyes are sourced from fruits and vegetables such as beets, carrots, blueberries and purple cabbage. After the mixture of agar and other ingredients is heated, it is cooled, a process that transforms it into a gel. At this point, the mixture is turned into thin plastic or poured into molds to cool. By adjusting the ingredients, Talep has created a firm material that will mold into shapes, such as the trays that a package of donuts sit in. The technique is versatile enough that it can also create a replacement for plastic bags, like those pasta is sold in. With the overarching goal of replacing single-use , disposable packaging, the algae packaging breaks down naturally within two to three months during warm summer months, depending on the thickness of the material. In the colder winter months, the material still breaks down, but requires a few extra weeks. + Margarita Talep Images via Margarita Talep

View original here: 
Designer creates algae-sourced alternative for plastic packaging

BREEAM Excellent-certified office of the future frames Bucharests restored Oromolu Villa

February 26, 2019 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on BREEAM Excellent-certified office of the future frames Bucharests restored Oromolu Villa

Bucharest-based architecture firm DSBA (Dorin Stefan Birou de Arhitectura) recently completed the Oromolu Office, a futuristic counterpart to its historic neighbor, the recently restored Oromolu Villa. Created as part of the Aviatorilor 8 complex in the heart of Bucharest , the three-story new-build was conceived as the “office of the future” with an eye-catching curvaceous glass curtain wall that helped the project achieve BREEAM Excellent certification. In addition to the triple-laminated facade, the building is equipped with a variety of cutting-edge sustainable technologies, from the implementation of an Advanced Building Management System to the availability of electric car chargers, bike racks and showers on all underground parking levels. The centerpiece and the inspiration behind the Aviatorilor 8 complex is the Oromolu House, a historic landmark built in 1927. The construction of the BREEAM -certified office building was completed alongside the restoration of the historic villa, which had previously suffered from neglect for years. The transformation of the site has restored the landmark building to its former glory. “Oromolu Office is a dialogue between old and new, between heritage and new technologies, a reflection on the glass of the history who yearns to be contemporary,” the architects explain in their project statement. “The innovation factor is defined by the 16m-long canopy and double-ventilated façade with triple-laminated double-curved glass that enhances the quality of the interior space and the flowing green jardinière controls the heat transfer and gives a graceful expression to the whole architectural approach.” Related: Contemporary cabin-like cafe pops up in the heart of Bucharest As a futuristic “smart” building, the Oromolu Office features not only the latest generation HVAC systems, but is also the first building in Romania to use the cutting-edge heating solution that embeds a PE-Xa pipework system in the slurry walls, which also help heat and cool the neighboring historic villa. The energy efficiency and sustainability of the office is further optimized with rainwater collection and recycling, sensor-controlled lights and blinds, low-flow fixtures and the use of recycled construction materials. + DSBA Images by Radu Malasincu and Vlad Patru

Read more here:
BREEAM Excellent-certified office of the future frames Bucharests restored Oromolu Villa

A midcentury warehouse becomes a vibrant office for creatives

February 6, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A midcentury warehouse becomes a vibrant office for creatives

Australian architecture and interior design firm Studio 103 has given a tired warehouse on Melbourne’s Hoddle Street in Abbotsford a new lease on life as their new modern and light-filled workplace. The adaptive reuse project sensitively references the building’s manufacturing history, from retaining existing architectural elements to the application of an industrial-inspired material palette. The rehabbed structure now serves as a modern and agile workplace that prioritizes health and wellbeing through ample access to natural light, a gym and plenty of greenery. Formerly used by British haberdashery manufacturing company Faire Brothers & Co for producing clothing parts in the 1940s, the warehouse at 310 Hoddle Street has changed hands over the decades, yet has always remained in the textile industry. Now defunct, Studio 103 seized the chance to repurpose the old warehouse as part of a growing adaptive reuse trend in Abbotsford. The interior design firm teamed up with building partners McCormack Property Services, who are conveniently located in the building right next door. “We saw this as a great opportunity to establish a streamlined working relationship between Studio 103 and our partners McCormack,” says Tom Yang, Senior Interior Designer at Studio 103. “We set out to create a unique, functional space which retains its original industrial charm, utilizing the existing architectural features as a foundation – but our end goal was to promote integration between Studio 103 and McCormack Property Services .” Related: An old warehouse is remade into a stylish hotel with a copper chevron crown The rehabbed warehouse has been divided into a series of zones conducive to collaboration between both companies. Industrial influences can be seen in the preserved architecture—the original red brick walls, large black-framed windows and polished concrete flooring—along with new sleek additions such as the industrial-inspired shelving. The designers also added floor-to-ceiling windows that flood the interiors with natural light, while timber trusses and greenery lend a sense of warmth. + Studio 103 Images by Jack Lovel

Read the original: 
A midcentury warehouse becomes a vibrant office for creatives

Aquaponic gardens bring life to an unused balcony in an architects’ office

February 1, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Aquaponic gardens bring life to an unused balcony in an architects’ office

When a young architecture start-up in Vietnam went looking for office space, the Farming Architects  team, led by founder An Viet Dung, looked to the local vernacular for inspiration. The result is the Urban Eco Balcony, a 376-square-foot office designed to showcase how it’s possible to bring new life to the empty and unused balconies found throughout Hanoi. The interior space is comprised of a unique steel grid system, which was installed with an aquaponic system to breathe new life and green space into the office. According to Farming Architects founder An Viet Dung, when the budding design practice decided to open its first office in Hanoi, the team realized that the city’s ubiquitous balconies were largely unused, most likely because of urban pollution , noise and even security issues. Related: New library in Hanoi aims to show young children the benefits of aquaponics in an urban setting Using this urban challenge as inspiration, the firm decided to rent a downtown office that would focus on the importance of giving purpose to these “dead spaces.” By using a number of architectural solutions, Farming Architects created an open and vibrant working space , referred to as the Urban Eco Balcony, with various multi-functional features. First, the architects installed a steel girder-tree system that helps create a strong connection between the interior and the balcony areas. Large floor-to-ceiling glass doors lead to the outdoor spaces and welcome  natural light inside. The steel grid formations also provide protection from harsh sun rays and help block the rain from coming into the office. Additionally, the steel frames are modular, meaning they can be rearranged depending on necessity. This feature adds a lot of functionality to the office, as the structures can be used as storage, book cases, mounts for additional lighting and more. Perhaps the steel grid system’s best use, however, is to support the office’s aquaponic system , which fills the balcony. Filling the “dead spaces” with plants would be an obvious choice to liven up the work space, but the architects wanted to take it a bit further by creating a system of aquaculture with plants grown hydroponically. This system requires little-to-no maintenance and creates a fresh, healthy atmosphere for the working space. + Farming Architects Photography by Thai Thach and Viet Dung An via Farming Architects

View post:
Aquaponic gardens bring life to an unused balcony in an architects’ office

A London office boasts biophilic design for a healthier, happier workplace

November 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A London office boasts biophilic design for a healthier, happier workplace

A new experimental office on the 12th floor of The Shard in London offers a breath of fresh air … literally. Wrapped in bamboo surfaces and punctuated by living plants, facilities management company Mitie’s headquarters in London was created by local practice DaeWha Kang Design . The biophilic project — dubbed the Living Lab at The Shard — mimics nature from its natural materials palette to the circadian lighting system linked to an astronomical clock. As its name suggests, the Living Lab at The Shard will be used as a pilot study to measure the impact of biophilic design on worker wellness and productivity. In addition to the client, the project was created in collaboration with Dr. Marcella Ucci (head of the MSc in Health, Wellbeing and Sustainable Buildings at the University College of London). A post-occupancy study will compare daily surveys of Mitie employees who will work at the Living Lab desks for four weeks at a time followed by a four-week work period in a “control area” on the same floor with similar environmental conditions but without biophilic design. “Biophilia refers to human beings’ innate need for a connection with nature,” DaeWha Kang Design said in its press release. “Human physiology is wired to seek qualities of light, view, material and other factors common in the natural world. The Living Lab is fully immersive, with rich and intricate patternization, natural materials  and interactive and dynamic lighting.” Related: This dreamy cluster of cabins houses light-filled live/work spaces in Hokkaido The project comprises two main spaces: the “Living Lab” immersive work environment and two “Regeneration Pods” for short-term rest and meditation. Bamboo was used for the sculptural privacy screens that curve up at the ceiling; different textures and shades of bamboo were also used for the floor, desks and task lights providing a warm contrast to The Shard’s cool glass-and-metal palette. The Regeneration Pods, also built of bamboo, were created by combining digital fabrication with hand-finishing techniques and feature plush built-in seating that faces walls of glass for city views. A subtle circadian lighting system uses color-changing lights to mimic the sun — a cool blue is cast in the morning that changes to bright white in the afternoon and finally reaches a fiery orange near sunset. + DaeWha Kang Design Images by Tom Donald for Aldworth James & Bond and Kyungsub Shin via DaeWha Kang Design

See the rest here: 
A London office boasts biophilic design for a healthier, happier workplace

A modern home in India stays naturally cool without AC

October 31, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A modern home in India stays naturally cool without AC

When Surat-based architect Ankit Parekh of Parekh Collaborative was asked to design a family home in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, one of the prerequisites was for a comfortably cool residence without air conditioning. In response, Parekh turned to ancient, low-tech methods for natural cooling, from decorative yet functional jali screens to stack ventilation. As a result, the house, named Rambaugh, maintains a temperature variation of 6 to 8 degrees year-round. Crafted with a contemporary appearance rooted in traditional techniques, Rambaugh was designed to house a family of six in Burhanpur. Slightly over 20,000 square feet in size, the residence includes ample space for large gatherings — the client’s extended family lives in the same precinct — and celebrates indoor-outdoor living. Shared communal areas flanked by green space form the heart of the two-story home, from the open-plan living room and dining area bookended by courtyards on the ground floor to the lounge that opens up to a lower terrace on the first floor. The formal living room and kitchen are cordoned off in opposite corners of the home. The master bedroom and two other bedrooms are located on the ground floor, while two additional bedrooms can be found upstairs. A solar site study informed the orientation of the building and the placement of openings that, combined with mechanically operated turbulators, take advantage of stack ventilation . The stone jali (a traditional, perforated, decorative screen) was hand-cut on site and installed on the southwest side of the home to deflect unwanted solar gain. A large existing Tamarind tree on the southeast of the site provides additional shade. The layout of the house also promotes natural ventilation and access to ample daylight. Moreover, rainwater is harvested and reused in the home. Related: A beautiful perforated facade shields this office from India’s harsh sun “The house is picturesque from all the sides because of ample appreciation space around it,” Parekh Collaborative noted. “This space is well designed with landscape elements and complements the house exteriors. A textured crimson block abutting a white mass on the side adds to iconic imagery of the house in abstraction. A dialogue between the house and landscape is generated using Mughal garden patterns.” + Parekh Collaborative Images by Nachiket Gujar

View original post here:
A modern home in India stays naturally cool without AC

European parliament supports the ban of single-use plastics

October 31, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on European parliament supports the ban of single-use plastics

The EU adopted new plans last week to ban single-use plastic items like plates, straws, cutlery, balloon sticks and cotton buds — which make up over 70 percent of marine litter — by 2021. Under draft plans approved by Parliament, MEPs also added items to the banned list that contained products made of oxo-degradable plastics, like bags and fast-food containers made of expanded polystyrene. The ban also incorporates a plan for several other items that do not have an alternative, like single-use sandwich boxes and containers for fruits, veggies, ice cream and desserts. For those products, EU member states will need to reduce their use by at least 25 percent by 2025. The strategy for those items includes using multiple-use products and recycling . Parliament also approved other plastics, like beverage bottles, to be collected separately and then recycled at a rate of 90 percent by 2025. Related: Jamaica will ban plastic bags, straws and Styrofoam by 2019 MEPs have also targeted waste from tobacco products, particularly cigarette filters that contain plastic, in the plastic ban . The plan for those items is a 50 percent reduction by 2025 and an 80 percent reduction by 2030. Cigarette butts are the second-most littered single-use plastic item in the EU, and just one can pollute between 500 and 1000 liters (132 and 264 gallons) of water. When thrown on the roadway, they can take up to 12 years to degrade. There is also a plan for lost or abandoned fishing gear, which represents about 27 percent of the waste found on European beaches. Member states are to ensure that at least half of it is collected each year, with a recycling target of 15 percent by 2025. The costs to reach the goals set for cigarette butts and fishing gear is to be paid for by tobacco companies and manufacturers of fishing gear. Frédérique Ries, who drafted the report, said that the ban is an ambitious directive that is essential for protecting the marine environment. + European Parliament Image via Tim Parkinson

View original here: 
European parliament supports the ban of single-use plastics

We love electric scooters but is the Bird trend actually bad for the environment?

September 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on We love electric scooters but is the Bird trend actually bad for the environment?

The debut of electric scooter programs in cities such as Austin, Washington D.C. and San Diego has been making headlines with promises of cleaner air , but is this really the case? Between LimeBike, Waybots, Spin and Bird, which has been newly introduced to the Los Angeles area, there is a plethora of companies jumping on the trend of promoting eco-friendly scooters to city planners and residents. With public transportation methods significantly improving in environmental efficiency — and the majority of distances traveled by scooter being walkable distances — the carbon footprint might not be as small as scooter-share programs are claiming. “Today, 40 percent of car trips are less than two miles long,” said Travis VanderZanden , founder and chief executive of Bird. “Our goal is to replace as many of those trips as possible, so we can get cars off the road and curb traffic and greenhouse gas emissions.” The scooters are the latest trend to enter the app-based mobility market, which has passengers whimsically racing through city streets at a $1 rental price, plus 15 cents for every minute after. Related: Paris launches electric scooter sharing program with Coup and Gogoro While Bird is assuming that half of its scooter rides are replacing mile-long car trips, Phil Lasley, who has been studying traffic, bicycle and pedestrian issues for the Texas A&M Transportation Institute said , “We honestly don’t know yet.” According to his evaluations, it is possible that the scooters are replacing short drives but with quantities still uncertain. He said there are many other aspects to consider. “Are these trips taking away from other bicycle trips? Are they taking away from transit? Are they taking away from walking?” Lasley asked. For instance, a mile-long trip to the office means that the 15-mph vehicle would charge for a minimum of 4 minutes plus extra for time in traffic. This exceeds the average public transportation fares for cities such as Austin and L.A., where the average full-fare ticket only costs $1.25 to $1.50 and can get you a lot farther. City bike-share programs are available at comparable rates to those of public transportation, as seen with L.A.’s new bicycle advertising campaign . The green transit platform is promoting the city’s carbon-free single rides at the same cost as a bus or metro ticket, while daily users of a monthly plan are seeing fractions of a dollar for their commute cycles. It goes without saying that owners of bikes, non-motorized scooters and skateboards are at a monetary and ecological advantage in comparison to those using electric scooters. Related: Gogoro revs up Smartscooter expansion with $300 million in new funding From an economic standpoint, Bird and LimeBike rides might be behind compared to alternatives such as buses, trains and bikes. But according to a Bird press release on its Austin launch, “Riders were able to prevent 445,334 pounds of carbon emissions.” LimeBike similarly claimed an estimated 8,500-pound reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in Austin in just two weeks. “With the launch of Lime-S, we are expanding the range of affordable, space-efficient and environmentally friendly mobility options available to D.C. residents,” said Jason Starr, a LimeBike executive for the company’s Washington D.C. division, back in March. With competing green vehicles focusing on both affordability and environmental friendliness, many people are looking to “space-efficien[cy]” to account for the hype of electric scooters. The space efficiency feature makes electric scooters fun to ride and easy to park anywhere, but it also means that chargers are driving long distances to pick up the scooters one by one. Each morning, electric scooters are dropped off en-mass at various hubs throughout the city. From there, riders can take the vehicles and drop them off wherever they wish within the city. Scooters now litter random sidewalks, storefronts and restaurant walkways — rarely in a collective group. At night they are “captured” (in the case of Birds) by the company’s chargers, who are individual citizens signed up to make money by collecting, powering and redistributing the scooters to the hubs each morning. Each scooter has a price tag on it, with those more difficult to collect scoring the charger a higher paycheck. The higher valuations on the remote scooters means that chargers are likely to drive farther to and from the stranded scooters, consuming more gas and emitting more carbon dioxide in the process. Similarly, morning commuters who wake up to find an empty dropping pad might eagerly run back to their reliable, personal vehicles instead of public transportation, because they are in a time-crunch. Whether these factors are being taken into account by the companies in their statistics is unclear. Related: Lyft is making all their rides carbon neutral Their popularity is as much their undoing as it is their achievement according to Haje Jan Kamps, portfolio director at venture capital firm Bolt. The entrepreneur recently published a piece on TechCrunch about the business models e-scooter companies would need to adopt in order to succeed. “They are currently in a massive scaling mode and so the only concern they have, really, is to get as many scooters on the roads as possible and as many rides as possible for each individual scooter,” Hamps said. “There is a real risk that some of the things like reusability or recyclability might be first on the chopping block.” The scooters are estimated to have a two-year life span , meaning they could end up in landfills at the end of their short life-cycle. This is something that Lasley agreed with. “It appears that these services are being heavily used,” he said, adding that the more popular they become, the more waste they will create. While we want to love the fun idea of electric scooters , it is clear that some things need to be improved. For these new companies, a learning and improvement process is to be expected. We are eager to see where these companies are headed in terms of creating a more eco-friendly product. Via Austin Monitor , The Washington Post ( 1 , 2 ) and  Chester Energy and Policy Images via Elvert Barnes ( 1 , 2 ), Luis Tamayo and Tim Evanson

See the original post here: 
We love electric scooters but is the Bird trend actually bad for the environment?

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 6337 access attempts in the last 7 days.