Off-grid geodesic cabins by FUGU can handle harsh climates

February 13, 2020 by  
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From remote snow-covered mountains to idyllic beaches in far-flung corners of the earth, Parisian studio  FUGU  has you covered with its new line of geodesic cabins. The solar-powered cabins, which come in various sizes and can be customized, are made with durable,  eco-friendly materials  and designed to be resilient in almost any harsh climate. While the structures are apt for any number of uses, FUGU’s  geodesic cabins  are primarily geared towards the hospitality sector. The domed cabins are the perfect solution for quiet retreats in remote areas, or even complimentary structures such as spas, gyms or office spaces. Related: Create your own backyard geodesic dome with these super affordable DIY kits With the smallest size coming in at just over 300-square-feet, the domes can be made to order at almost any size, but always put the environment first in their design. The modular cabins are also made out of  environmentally-friendly materials  that have proven resilient to almost any climate. Designed to run on solar power, the domes are equipped to go off-grid almost anywhere in the world. The dome’s eco-friendly manufacturing consists of frames made out of  engineered wood  (CLT, LVL or glued laminated timber), meaning less CO2 emissions than a conventional building. Additionally, the structures are designed to be built off the landscape, on piles or elevated terraces, to limit their impact on the environment. Due to their geodesic shape, which allows for optimal heat distribution and a significant heat flow exchange, the domes are inherently  energy efficient . To provide a tight thermal envelop, the structures use reinforced insulation that not only avoids energy loss, but keeps the structures warm and toasty in the winter months and nice and cool during the summer. + FUGU Geodesic Cabins Via Uncrate Images via FUGU

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Off-grid geodesic cabins by FUGU can handle harsh climates

Off-grid tiny cabin in Australia is just the place for a digital detox in the new year

January 1, 2020 by  
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Last year, we featured CABN ‘s collection of gorgeous, off-grid cabins that are designed to offer a serene respite away from the stresses of everyday life. Now, the Australian company has just unveiled another beautiful design, the Sadie, which is its first eco-retreat in Victoria. Tucked in the foothills of the Great Dividing Range, the solar-powered cabin is the ideal spot for reconnecting with nature in the new year. Like all of CABN’s projects, the Sadie is designed to go completely off the grid while still offering the ultimate in comfort for guests who are looking to immerse themselves in nature. Located on a remote property in Daylesford, the cabin is less than a 1.5 hour drive from Melbourne. Guests staying at the tiny cabin will enjoy the secluded area, which is surrounded by lush forest and unspoiled nature. Related: These Australian tiny cabins are designed to help us disconnect With a master bedroom and a comfy day bed, the cabin can accommodate up to four guests. In addition to the two sleep spaces, there is a main living area complete with the company’s signature, massive window that frames views of the forested landscape. This window is accompanied by a handful more, all of which brighten the space with natural light during the day. Despite its small size, the cabin has more than enough amenities to make guests feel at home. The bathroom sports a simplistic design of unfinished wood and has enough space for a shower and a composting toilet . For meals, there is a fully equipped kitchen and an outdoor grill. Guests can also enjoy a nice glass of wine while lounging around the firepit, provided its not bushfire season, of course. Although the cabin, which starts at $200 per night, is located in a remote forest seemingly at the end of the earth, in reality, the cabin retreat is in Daylesford, which has plenty of restaurants and shops nearby. Additionally, there are plenty of local wineries in the area to tour. + CABN Images via CABN

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Off-grid tiny cabin in Australia is just the place for a digital detox in the new year

Minimalist cabin in the Netherlands allows glampers to relax in style

November 16, 2018 by  
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From fancy safari tents to futuristic pods , there are various levels of glamping these days. But for those looking to get back to basics without sacrificing style, the De Grote Beer cabin located on a remote island in the Netherlands is right up your alley. Designed by Depot Rotterdam , the minimalist cabin is clad in black-washed wood with large glazed facades that allow guests to immerse themselves in the stunning nature that surrounds the site. Located on the breathtaking Terschelling Island, the two-bedroom, one-bath cabin  is a serene retreat that lets people disconnect while reconnecting with nature. The interior has a fully-functioning kitchen space and a welcoming dining and living area that opens up to an outdoor deck via large sliding glass doors. The interior design features a modern, minimalist color and materials palette, and the entire cabin runs on green electricity. Related: Gorgeous “glamping” eco-cabins help you reconnect with nature in luxury The two bedrooms are designed with simple wood walls, white ceilings and large windows that not only provide natural light but also stunning views. There is a master bedroom with a double bed and a second bedroom with bunk beds. The second bedroom also has a fabulous dome that allows guests to enjoy a bit of stargazing as they drift off to sleep. From the living space, guests can easily walk out onto the large, open-air deck. Wrapping around the front of the cabin with an exterior wood-burning fireplace, this deck is the heart of the retreat . A large sitting area with a table can be used for dining, playing games, reading or simply taking in the fresh air. The De Grote Beer cabin, which can be rented through Boutique Homes , starts at €87 per night. + De Grote Beer + Depot Rotterdam Via Dwell Photography by  Claudia Otten Photography via De Grote Beer

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Minimalist cabin in the Netherlands allows glampers to relax in style

Get away from it all in this tiny hut tucked into a Lithuanian forest

October 18, 2018 by  
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Designed by Ema Butrimaviciute of Lithuanian studio  Utopium , the Etno Hut is a 150-square-foot,  off-grid retreat tucked into a remote forest in Lithuania. Surrounded by breathtaking vistas, the tiny cabin, which was built with minimal impact to the landscape, is designed to provide a serene retreat for those looking to reconnect with nature. The cabin’s location, set in an expansive forest that sits between two Lithuanian cities, was strategic to its use. Wanting to provide city-goers with a serene weekend escape , the architect imagined a quiet retreat where anyone can escape from the hustle and bustle of city life without the inconvenience of driving for hours to get there. Related: Tiny ‘hut on wheels’ is the perfect vacation home to escape the concrete jungle Tucked into the edge of an expansive, lush forest, the tiny cabin was built on a slope facing south. Its orientation was strategic to take advantage of the sunshine and stunning views. The structure was built on a steel foundation screwed into the ground by hand as to minimize impact on the landscape. The entire hut, which was constructed out of Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs), was assembled in just three days. From a distance, the 150-square-foot cabin is virtually camouflaged into the forest backdrop thanks to its dark black facade. A large open-air deck leads to sliding glass doors that open wide to create a seamless connection with the landscape. On the interior, white walls and wood flooring brighten the modern living space. The cabin has a king-sized bed and a pull-out bed, a bathroom with a shower and a fully-equipped kitchenette. The space is meant to provide a relaxing atmosphere, with no transformable furniture or ladders — just everything needed for simple, uncomplicated living. + Utopium Via Archdaily Images via Utopium

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Get away from it all in this tiny hut tucked into a Lithuanian forest

These Australian tiny cabins are designed to help us disconnect

September 10, 2018 by  
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We all need a little digital detox once in a while, and these beautiful off-grid cabins are the ideal answer to getting away from it all. Scattered around South Australia’s most breathtaking landscapes, the CABN s are completely self-sustainable and eco-friendly tiny cabins that are designed to offer a serenity-focused retreat. The first CABN, named “Jude” after the founder’s mother, is located in a remote area in Adelaide Hills , just under an hour drive from Adelaide. Surrounded by 180 acres of sprawling natural grassland, guests will be just steps away from walking trails, creeks, dams and stunning scenery. Related: This off-grid, lunar lander-inspired tiny home is out of this world The tiny cabins are designed to offer guests a place where they can truly reconnect with nature. Although the cabins are completely off-grid, they don’t sacrifice comfort. Inspired by Scandinavian design, the compact structures are made out of natural timber . Inside, the minimalist interiors are geared toward relaxation. The tiny retreats’ front walls are almost entirely glazed, flooding the living space with natural light. Jude sleeps two guests in a king-sized bed, and the bathroom comes with an indoor shower and composting toilet . Guests will enjoy a kitchen equipped with all of the basic necessities. To completely relax, the CABN rules strictly forbid ironing of any sort. According to CABN creator Michael Lamprell, the inspiration for the retreat came from a personal experience while he was studying both minimalism and tiny home design . “For someone that has lived and worked within the excesses of consumerism, the concept of minimalism was a revelation,” Lamprell said. “I was at a point where stress and anxiety were affecting all areas of my life — something had to change. At the same time, I was introduced to the concept of tiny homes, and the opportunity to create stunning cabins in unique locations, allowing you to switch off your mobile phone and truly relax. Set in isolated spots, the aim is to help the terminally busy disconnect and recharge.” + CABN Via ArchDaily Images via CABN

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Solar-powered glass PurePod cabins provide the ultimate connection with nature

July 26, 2018 by  
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For those looking to commune with nature, these sustainable all-glass cabins located in idyllic landscapes around New Zealand are just for you. Powered by solar energy, PurePods are tiny transparent capsules in stunningly beautiful settings far, far away from any type of human activity. This remove from civilization allows guests to sit back, relax, and completely immerse themselves in nature. There are six PurePod locations around New Zealand, all in secluded landscapes outside of Christchurch. The locations are extremely off-grid and guests must hike for 10-15 minutes through natural terrain to reach their destination, enjoying a leisurely walk through lush forest and rolling hills. Related: Sweden is putting stressed-out people in tiny glass ‘chillout cabins’ The cabins are approximately 200 square feet and have large sliding doors that lead out to a wooden deck. However, their transparent facades give off the feeling of camping in the open air. From sunrise to sunset, cabin guests can enjoy 360-degree views of New Zealand’s incredible landscape, and they can drift off to sleep while enjoying stunning views of the Milky Way at night. The cabins operate completely off-grid and are built to minimize impact on the environment. The electricity comes from  solar panels , which generate enough to run the LED lighting , refrigerator and the water system. Bio-fuel heaters are used to keep the cabins warm and toasty even on chilly nights. For extra-sunny days, window blinds and ceiling shades help provide a respite from the heat. As the cabins are designed for disconnecting , they have no internet, TV or phone service, but guests will be able to enjoy what the company calls “sustainable luxury.” Each cabin has a comfortable queen-sized bed with ultra-soft linens, a small kitchen and a glass-enclosed shower with hot water. Guests can cook their own meals on a cooking hob and outdoor grill or take advantage of the cabins’ meal delivery system, which can be set up at the time of reservation. + PurePods Via Dwell Images via PurePods

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Solar-powered glass PurePod cabins provide the ultimate connection with nature

Barrel-shaped wooden pod retreat in France inspired by real life ‘bird charmer’

September 29, 2017 by  
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Mr Plocq’s Caballon is a beautiful 160-square-foot wooden pod located on the banks of the Loire river estuary. The pod’s unique design was inspired by the life of real-life bird charmer Émile Plocq, who supposedly built his own boat to follow migrating birds to Africa. Architects Aurélie Poirrier, Igor-Vassili Pouchkarevtch-Dragoche, and Vincent O’Connor created the barrel-shaped retreat by combining techniques used in naval and airplane carpentry, resulting in a fun boat-like hull topped with a transparent “cockpit” shell. The architectural team designed the pod for the local “Imaginary Nights” celebration, an annual event hosted by tourism board, Loirestu . Every year, the festival chooses a fun movable housing concept to be used as a guest retreat located along the Loire estuary in the west of France. This year, Mr Plocq’s Caballon’s inventive backstory, along with its great compact design , earned the pod its place in the event. Related: Egg-shaped GreenPod office lets you work from almost anywhere The tiny pod ‘s barrel shape was strategic to optimize the interior space despite its compact volume . The design basically comprises a ship-like wooden hull on the bottom, topped by a transparent cockpit partially covered by white canvas. Access to the interior is by a double swing door that opens up vertically as the steps fold out to the ground. There are two private areas in the interior, the bedroom and the bathroom, which are separated by a wooden door. The bedroom is located in the cockpit area, whose transparent glazing allows guests to sleep under the stars. The remaining hull space is the small bathroom with a sink and dry toilet , which is reached by a hollow 360° rotating door inserted into double wall behind the bed. The innovative “shower airlock” door allows guests ultimate privacy when turned inwards towards the bathroom. + Aurélie Poirrier + Igor-Vassili Pouchkarevtch-Dragoche + Vincent O’Connor Via Archdaily Photography by Corentin Schieb , Aurélie Poirrier

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Barrel-shaped wooden pod retreat in France inspired by real life ‘bird charmer’

Rocks in Canada hold oldest evidence of life we’ve found

September 29, 2017 by  
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3.95 billion-year-old rocks could offer the oldest evidence we’ve found for life on Earth . A team led by the University of Tokyo found graphite in Labrador, Canada that they think is biogenic, or produced by living organisms. They contend this is the oldest evidence of life, as opposed to microfossils found earlier in Quebec , saying the dating process used in the latter was highly controversial. In March, the journal Nature published the findings of an international team of researchers who’d found fossils in Quebec that they said could be between 3.77 and 4.28 billion years old. Now, nine scientists at institutions in Japan say they’ve actually found the oldest evidence of life on this planet, and it’s in 3.95 billion-year-old rocks. Related: World’s oldest fossils discovered in Canada – and they’re 4 billion years old These researchers found graphite in sedimentary rocks. Tsuyoshi Komiya of the University of Tokyo said, “Our samples are also the oldest supracrustal rocks preserved on Earth.” Phys.org pointed out the Quebec fossils were found in a similar formation. The Japan team measured the isotope composition of the graphite to find it was biogenic, although the identity of the organisms that produced the graphite or their appearance are mysteries. Komiya said the team could work to identify the organisms by scrutinizing “other isotopes such as nitrogen, sulphur, and iron of the organic matter and accompanied materials.” They can also analyze the rock’s chemical composition to try and figure out the organisms’ environment . Other researchers, like geochemist Daniele Pinti of the University of Quebec at Montreal, seem impressed by the new team’s findings and process. He told CBC News, “For the moment, it looks very convincing.” Phys.org said that should the discovery be accurate, it would mean life sprung up on Earth a geological second after the planet formed around 4.5 billion years ago. Nature published the new study this week. Via Phys.org and CBC News Images via Wikimedia Commons and Tashiro, Takayuki, et al.

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This twisting tower is made out of 2,000 3D-printed terracotta bricks

September 29, 2017 by  
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A team of researchers and students from the HKU Faculty of Architecture worked with Holger Kehne of Plasma Studio to create a beautiful twisted tower out of 2,000 3D-printed terracotta bricks. Each clay brick used to create the Ceramic Constellation Pavilion was individually printed in a unique shape or size using innovative robotic technology, which prints at a faster pace than most 3D printing machines and provides incredible versatility in the building process. The 12-foot pavilion was part of the inaugural “Robotic Architecture Series” workshop hosted by international property developer, Sino Group . All of the materials used in the project were made in the Robotics Lab at HKU’s Faculty of Architecture. By building the 3D tower the team sought to test the feasibility of robotically printed terracotta bricks. The printing process means that the clay bricks can be configured into distinct shapes and densities, adding an invaluable versatility to the design process. Related: Perforated screens made from reused terracotta tiles wrap around this house in Malaysia The team began with about 1,500 pounds of raw terracotta clay . Using the university’s innovative robotic technology with a rapid print time of 2 or 3 minutes for each brick, it took about three weeks to print the materials. After firing the bricks in an oven at 1,877 degrees Fahrenheit, students from the HKU Department of Architecture assembled the beautiful pavilion during the ten day workshop. + HKU Faculty of Architecture + Sino Group + Plasma Studio

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This twisting tower is made out of 2,000 3D-printed terracotta bricks

Puerto Rico electricity crisis sparks interest in renewable energy

September 29, 2017 by  
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Hurricane Maria has left swaths of Puerto Rico without power – and millions of people could have to go without electricity for months . The storm’s devastation has stirred new interest in obtaining more energy from clean sources like solar or wind . Energy experts say increasing renewables and transitioning from centralized grids to microgrids could boost resilience as Puerto Rico and other Caribbean islands weather storms. CARICOM, a Caribbean nation consortium, already hoped to hit 47 percent renewable energy by 2027. The recent hurricanes could act as a motivation to work for that goal. Caribbean countries in the past have relied mostly on imported fossil fuels , which are expensive both for the islands and for the environment . And storms can cripple power lines. Related: Puerto Rico could be without electricity for months due to Hurricane Maria There is an alternative, according to The Washington Post. Renewable sources, coupled with battery storage , powering small grids could offer more resiliency. Fossil fuels would offer backup—at least initially until battery storage becomes more affordable. The microgrids could be connected to a main grid but could also be isolated. With this new setup, the Caribbean could benefit from trade winds and solar panels. According to renewable energy expert Tom Rogers, who works at Britain’s Coventry University, solar systems in the tropics can “generate over one and a half times more than exactly the same PV system” installed in a location with a higher latitude like Europe. Rogers told The Washington Post, “You look at islands like Dominica, Anguilla, and other islands affected by the recent hurricanes, I’ve spoken to a couple of the utilities, and they say they would prefer to rebuild using distributed generation with storage, and just trying to reduce the amount of transmission lines. Because that’s where their energy systems fail. It’s having these overhead cables.” Via The Washington Post Images via Sgt. Jose Ahiram Diaz-Ramos/Puerto Rico National Guard and NOAA Satellites Twitter

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